Mental game

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I recently found my self down a set and IIRC down 3-4 in the 2nd set. I was in florida and thought wearing sweats had prepared me for the heat. I would drink a gallon of water or more here in cali.

In florida I brought the same gallon and well long story short the sun had gotten to me, and at 3-4 I was EXHAUSTED and also had pulled a calf muscle. I never have calf issues but this day it was hurting but i played on.

At 3-4 I really was exhausted and didnt want to go on. I cant recall ever feeling like this and was thinking of just quitting. Long story but I didnt want to lose this match. I basically refused to lose and started hitting out and became focused and for some reason I had an extra bit of energy. IMHO it was all mental as my body really was done.

I won the 2nd set 6-4.

It really was mind over body.

Having played USTA matches I have had matches where mentally I was sleeping and matches where I was really focused. But this match in florida was different. I just refused to lose even though the body was done.

So how does one tap into that all the time regardless of how the body feels?
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Well, your opponent might have been having the same problems with the tough conditions.
 

Etefnmtafafb

New User
From what I've experienced where this has happened to me before, I've noticed a common pattern: it became unacceptable for me to lose that match.

When it's happened, I believed and told myself (or my partner) that I (we) were going to win the match by raising my own intensity. I can't really explain it-- it really is how much you want it and how much more you enjoy winning.

Sadly, it doesn't always work out. When fear, or a realization that your opponent might be better than you, sinks in, it is much harder to get into that zone.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Well, your opponent might have been having the same problems with the tough conditions.
Well he lives in Florida and is more used to the humidity than I am. Its doubtful he was troubled like I was. Though its possible
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
From what I've experienced where this has happened to me before, I've noticed a common pattern: it became unacceptable for me to lose that match.

When it's happened, I believed and told myself (or my partner) that I (we) were going to win the match by raising my own intensity. I can't really explain it-- it really is how much you want it and how much more you enjoy winning.

Sadly, it doesn't always work out. When fear, or a realization that your opponent might be better than you, sinks in, it is much harder to get into that zone.
I think its this. It was totally unacceptable to lose! So I will now make it always unacceptable to lose and see what happens.

Thanks.
 

sainttom

Rookie
Interesting post. i played a match at a tournament not long ago, went up 2-0 then found myself down 6-3. Was feeling a bit sick at what was happening.

What it took was a complete change of tactics and telling myself that it was unacceptable to lose, I'm gonna change things up and at least go out with a bang if I do lose.

Didn't lose another game and then won the match. I guess what I'm trying to say is you gotta switch it up when your down and it's not working.
 

LuckyR

Legend
I basically refused to lose and started hitting out and became focused and for some reason I had an extra bit of energy. IMHO it was all mental as my body really was done.
Well if you are losing by playing a certain level of consistancy (your A game) then you try to play a lower consistancy game (hitting out), if you are on that day you can make a bunch of winners in a row. Or who knows, maybe your opponent changed his game away from what was beating you.

Since we're only talking about 3 games (from 3-4 to 6-4), you may have just happened to get lucky and play over your head for a couple of games, randomly.

Statistically you're going to need a longer series (of games/matches) to draw any general conclusions.
 
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