Methodology to become a better stringer

Hi all,

So I have recently purchased a Gamma Progression 2 ELS as I have played tennis for 10+ years and I am sick of paying for +$40 string jobs. The hope is to string my own racquets, friends' racquets, and eventually start doing it as a side hustle for people who don't want to pay $35 bucks to just get cheap synth gut in their racquet. I also hope that stringing my own racquets will allow me to play around with different string combos and tensions without being scared of wasting a ton of money on a string job.

My question is: how would you all recommend building experience stringing? My current set-up for racquets that I actually use is Luxilon ALU Power mains and Head Velocity MLT crosses. I don't think it is a good idea for me to jump straight into stringing those as mess ups would be costly and I am a little worried about damaging my frames or grommets for my first couple of string jobs. I was thinking of buying a reel of Gosen OG Sheep Micro and stringing up an older Volkl that I have a couple of times before trying to string racquets that I actually use. I don't ever use that Volkl anymore, so I am pretty much going to have to cut out the strings over and over which feels somewhat wasteful.

How does that idea sound and would you recommend something different?

Thanks!
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
@Firepandas I think what you've outlined above is perfect. When I started stringing nigh on to 40 years ago, I dove right in and strung my Yonex R-7. A friend who was with me and interested suggested I do an old frame. Nope, not me.

The only way to become a better stringer IMO is to do it. Stringing is more about repetition than anything else, both in practice and product. You perform a plainly repeatable process to hopefully produce a repeatable product. :)

Good luck and congrats!
 

esm

Hall of Fame
ditto.
when i bought the DP, i got a reel of basic Babolat Syn Gut (it was on sale if i recall..)....
picked an old racquet that i used to play, and strung it up.
loads of youtube video on techniques and understand various knots.... the more you do the easier/better you will get.
2 piece would be easier once you get used to the knots, and it will be less string to deal with at the start. lol
a starting clamp will come in handy too.
patience and loads of practice goes a long way.
as Mr. Rabbit said above, good luck, congrats & have loads of fun

(buying all sorts of strings, in various colours are fun too!)
 

LOBALOT

Professional
I agree with Rabbit and that is exactly what I did. My club gave me an old racquet that someone had left on a court and not claimed for over a year. I bought some cheap synthetic gut and I restrung the racquet over and over and over again.
 
Ok great!

Thanks for the replies everyone! Definitely excited! My stringer should be here by Friday, and I am going to try to put in an order for strings, starting clamp, and string clippers tonight. Hopefully everything goes swell!
 

chic

Professional
Ok great!

Thanks for the replies everyone! Definitely excited! My stringer should be here by Friday, and I am going to try to put in an order for strings, starting clamp, and string clippers tonight. Hopefully everything goes swell!
Don't forget needle nose pliers and maybe an awl if you don't already have them/ they don't come with the stringer!
 
Don't forget needle nose pliers and maybe an awl if you don't already have them/ they don't come with the stringer!
Yep! Those are coming with the stringer. I heard some people like bent nose pliers, but I am going to string a couple of racquets before I decide if I need one or not.
 

colan5934

Semi-Pro
Echoing the posters above: get an old beater racquet and a $20 reel of nylon to practice. Keep working at it! I started 12 years ago and it took me 3 hours to do it right the first time. Now, I’m a Master Racquet Tech and can do a racquet in 10-12 minutes if speed is the goal. If you want to be really good at it, treat it like anything else you’d build as a skill: work hard, be a glutton for information, get better every time, ask for help, fix your mistakes, and practice frequently. If we’re just talking the process of stringing a racquet, it’s not that complicated once you figure it out. You’ll be stringing for yourself and your friends in no time!
 

chic

Professional
Yep! Those are coming with the stringer. I heard some people like bent nose pliers, but I am going to string a couple of racquets before I decide if I need one or not.
Imo bent nose don't really matter unless you're doing some pretty dense frames (ie 18x20 <95in²) and even then they don't help that much.

But I get why some people prefer them
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
I have used both regular needle nose and bent nose. I do prefer the bent nose for whatever reason.
 

zinzan8

Rookie
Good idea to start with an older frame and cheap synthetic gut. But you'll eventually want to test multis and polys on your older frame before trying to string them on your main racquets, since they will string very differently. Well, fundamentally the same, but OGSM stretches quite a bit, so everything will feel different, and knots will be harder to tie, etc.

I couldn't bring myself to just string, cut, and restring for practice. Even on junker racquets, I'd take out my first stringjobs and hit at least a little to see how they feel. Or I'd get my son to hit with them.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
I was thinking of buying a reel of Gosen OG Sheep Micro and stringing up an older Volkl that I have a couple of times before trying to string racquets that I actually use. I don't ever use that Volkl anymore, so I am pretty much going to have to cut out the strings over and over which feels somewhat wasteful.
Perfect. The only thing I would say is you can probably go even cheaper with a reel - than OG sheep.

The best way to learn to string and develop your technique is...to string racquets. :)
 

esm

Hall of Fame
Yes. Definitely have a hit afterwards too. This is another way to improve the stringing process.
Also - for OP - take your time. The first attempt can take a couple/few hours, but you will improve the time as you go. Try don’t get trapped into the getting a record time for a string job. Get used to the process and be consistent. (that’s what I tell myself anyway... lol)
 
Thanks for all the advice so far!

Good idea to start with an older frame and cheap synthetic gut. But you'll eventually want to test multis and polys on your older frame before trying to string them on your main racquets, since they will string very differently. Well, fundamentally the same, but OGSM stretches quite a bit, so everything will feel different, and knots will be harder to tie, etc.

I couldn't bring myself to just string, cut, and restring for practice. Even on junker racquets, I'd take out my first stringjobs and hit at least a little to see how they feel. Or I'd get my son to hit with them.
I wish I could lend the racquet to someone it is suited for and have them give me feedback, but I'll try hitting with it for like 10-20 minutes before cutting out the strings each time. Thanks for letting me know that different strings will string differently. Do you have a super cheap poly in mind that I could practice with?

Perfect. The only thing I would say is you can probably go even cheaper with a reel - than OG sheep.

The best way to learn to string and develop your technique is...to string racquets. :)
I am choosing OG Sheep because it is cheap and I wouldn't mind testing them in the crosses of an actual racquet I use. I feel like if I get something really crappy, I will have left over string in the reel and not want to actual use it in a racquet. But if you have a cheaper string in mind, let me know. I just saw that OG Sheep is the one of the cheapest, but still playable strings.

Yes. Definitely have a hit afterwards too. This is another way to improve the stringing process.
Also - for OP - take your time. The first attempt can take a couple/few hours, but you will improve the time as you go. Try don’t get trapped into the getting a record time for a string job. Get used to the process and be consistent. (that’s what I tell myself anyway... lol)
Definitely going to try to take it slow. I'll probably end up having my laptop open following one of Herb Baird's videos on youtube while I am stringing.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
I am choosing OG Sheep because it is cheap and I wouldn't mind testing them in the crosses of an actual racquet I use. I feel like if I get something really crappy, I will have left over string in the reel and not want to actual use it in a racquet. But if you have a cheaper string in mind, let me know. I just saw that OG Sheep is the one of the cheapest, but still playable strings.
In that case, that’s a good plan IMO.
 

chic

Professional
Honestly Pros Pro strings are pretty quality for the price. Could probably buy 3 reels for <$100 (a poly, a multi, and a syn gut) and just string them for people who don't care what string they have a low cost.

Heck in my old racquets I liked pp strings better than some of the cheaper name brands I tried.
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Having a reel of GOGM is not a bad idea but if I were you I’d string my frame with whatever I normally play with. It you normally use a poly/MLT use that. OTOH If you like GOGM then use GOGM.
 

LOBALOT

Professional
Good idea to start with an older frame and cheap synthetic gut. But you'll eventually want to test multis and polys on your older frame before trying to string them on your main racquets, since they will string very differently. Well, fundamentally the same, but OGSM stretches quite a bit, so everything will feel different, and knots will be harder to tie, etc.

I couldn't bring myself to just string, cut, and restring for practice. Even on junker racquets, I'd take out my first stringjobs and hit at least a little to see how they feel. Or I'd get my son to hit with them.
Yes. I found this to be the case when I started. I was a little rough on string and would kink poly when I was new at stringing. I remember the first time I restrung a racquet with Luxilon Element. I had the string so kinked up it was a mess. Luckily it was just for my son but when I showed his pro I recall the look I got from him.... It was like... "What the heck did you do to this thing?"

Same with Multi or softer string and trying to get it into a blocked hole. I recall a lot of cussing.

However, it didn't take long before I had it down and it was fun experience in learning how to restring racquets.
 
Having a reel of GOGM is not a bad idea but if I were you I’d string my frame with whatever I normally play with. It you normally use a poly/MLT use that. OTOH If you like GOGM then use GOGM.
I've never tried OG Sheep Micro, but I have heard a lot of good things about it. It is one of the strings I wanted to try out in my crosses. I also would like to practice with the combo of poly/mlt, but I can't find a good, cheap MLT that I can use. Velocity reels aren't really cheap, and I would rather not butcher a reel of those as I am trying to get the basics of stringing down.
 

fjcamry

Semi-Pro
What’s the starting clamp? On a drop weight I use the free clamps wrenches that came with the klippermate.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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LOBALOT

Professional
What’s the starting clamp? On a drop weight I use the clamps wrenches that came with the klippermate.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Go to Tennis Warehouse Web Site and look under Strings / Stringing and then tools and supplies. I can't paste the link from work but you will find a starting clamp there.
 

chic

Professional
What’s the starting clamp? On a drop weight I use the free clamps wrenches that came with the klippermate.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Starting clamp can still be useful with the klippermate, but definitely not necessary of you don't care to use one (I don't)

It can replace the function of the starter pin and save you having to do a starter knot (which can pull into the grommet depending on the string). Although you can use the bigger clamps for this it's just more annoying.
 

zinzan8

Rookie
I've never tried OG Sheep Micro, but I have heard a lot of good things about it. It is one of the strings I wanted to try out in my crosses. I also would like to practice with the combo of poly/mlt, but I can't find a good, cheap MLT that I can use. Velocity reels aren't really cheap, and I would rather not butcher a reel of those as I am trying to get the basics of stringing down.
I think a reel of OGSM is a good idea in your case, and is also what I bought to start with, along with a handful of 40’ sets of polys and multis I was interested in, and a couple other syn gut sets I bought for fun. My first “hybrid” practice was just Blue SpiralTek and OGSM for my son’s Pure Drive Junior racquet.

You don’t need a full reel of MLT or Poly to practice with on your cheap racquets. You don’t need 16.5 full beds of a string before you’ll be comfortable with it.
 

zinzan8

Rookie
Oh, one more suggestion.

Yes, take your time, but don't take it to an extreme. I've read of people on here doing the mains one day, then doing the crosses the next! On my first couple racquets, I'll admit to stopping the check notes or even to rewatch a stringing video, but not more than a few minutes.
 

Brand77

New User
I only started stringing recently myself and I found it a lot easier than expected. So don't overthink it too much and just enjoy the process.
The only really annoying thing are rackets where you have to put a string through a hole which is blocked by two tensioned strings. Then you can kiss the 1 hour mark goodbye.:-D
 

Rohith Kolli

New User
I have been stringing for a few years now and I got better and better, the more I did. I started with a drop weight and am now using an electric stringer.
 

Erlang

Rookie
The only really annoying thing are rackets where you have to put a string through a hole which is blocked by two tensioned strings. Then you can kiss the 1 hour mark goodbye.:-D
You'll run into that issue in very few racquets if you follow the manufacturer's recommendations for tie-offs. But if you do, there are a few tricks you can use:
  • put some scrap string in place ahead of time (before pulling tension)
  • apply some beeswax (chapstick also works) to lubricate the strings
  • cut the end of string at a sharp angle to help thread it in
  • push the string in while holding the pliers as close as possible to the end for better leverage
  • gently squish the strings that are blocking the hole using an awl
 

jim e

Legend
You can also place a small scrap string between the string that blocks the hole and the frame before you tension that string that blocks the opening. That way when you get to that grommet you just take needle nose and grab both ends of scrap string and lift up or push down to open up opening and slide string in. Just takes a little planning.
Also helps if you just cut tip to sharp point and just slowly push string in very small increments so it will not bend. That typically works the majority of the time.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Having a reel of GOGM is not a bad idea but if I were you I’d string my frame with whatever I normally play with. It you normally use a poly/MLT use that. OTOH If you like GOGM then use GOGM.
Did you even read the OP? He’s going to use an old racket and cheap string to learn.

Reading is Fundamental

Or is it your compulsive need to post whether it is pertinent or, as in most cases not?

And it’s OGSM.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
My question is: how would you all recommend building experience stringing?
I would suggest you practice on the racket you like to play with with the string you like best. If Lux ALU / Head MLT are the strings you like best use them and learn to string with them. If you'd like to try Gosen OG Micro as a cross buy a set and try it before buying a reel. If you know someone that likes Gosen OG Micro and uses it a lot have them buy a reel of Gosen OG Micro and practice stringing their rackets free so you can learn. You probably have friends that use Poly / Synthetic Gut or Multifilament crosses also. Offer to string their rackets free if they buy the string. I would not string a racket I'm not going to play with and buy a reel of string I might like just to learn.

EDIT: Also if learning to string is your primary objective try to find a USRSA stringing instructor in your area (https://www.racquettech.com/stringing/instructor_search.php,) or find a friend that strings and will show you.
 
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jim e

Legend
I also recommend that you find a local stringer that knows what he is doing to teach you the proper way to string. You should know just what you are doing before you attempt to string someone else's racquet. You should know how to read string patterns so you know the patterns of each racquet that may come your way. Join the USRSA as they have a book called The Digest, that had most racquet frame patterns listed, and they have a technique manual that covers a lot of the basics of stringing. I have had some frames come my way where pattern was not listed in Digest, but being a member I was able to call USRSA and get the proper pattern.
Watch some of Yulittle videos, they are on sticky of these threads.
Beware there are some internet videos that have terrible techniques as well. Yulittle does a nice job on his videos, as he knows what he is doing. @Irvin that is Mr. Tennis also has proper techniques on his videos as well. You will not go wrong watching those two stringers showing you proper way to string. Over time you will still pick up tips and ideas to make the process go better for you. You never stop learning from another fellow stringer.
If you can do a consistent good job each time , over time you get a reputation, but let one poor string job get out and word travels fast.
Stringers don't really make a great amount of money, as many string to be sure their own racquet is done properly, or for there love of the craft, and for the pride of stringing a well done, consistently done job.
You should know how to check over each racquet that comes your way. Get a cracked racquet that you did not notice, and then remove strings, now your responsible from that point on. Stringing places stress on racquet and can snap if there was previous small fracture, I have noticed several cracked racquets over the years, some I told player it is their responsibility, and some I have refused to string. You do not have to string every racquet that you get. Look them over real well.. By not telling player ahead of time, you are now owing someone a new racquet if player was not informed of fracture before you started. How many string jobs to compensate for that error. Also check out each grommet before you start. Cracked grommets you should know how to handle those. Keep proper records and record serial numbers of each racquet you do. I log the date, players name ,phone number, racquet, serial number, string used ,tension used, anything else that is given with racquet, like string dampner, cover, etc. I had one player ask me where the string damper was, told player it was not on racquet. Someone later found it in parking lot of the indoor facility, but you need to know just what is given to you, so have proper records..
Since you are the stringer, you are the expert and should be able to answer any questions on string types and tensions that a player may ask. You have to ask the right questions as to what their game is like. Over time you will learn to string relatively fast, but then talking to player about strings and tensions, thoroughly checking each racquet over, recording proper information, contacting player when job done, even if you get to point where you string in under 30 minutes, the time actually spent with player and racquet all takes time.
Know what strings players in your area use so you can have proper inventory. Someone asks for a particular string and you do not have, you may need to order, takes time, price of string , shipping, , but if player supplies string, you should have policy as you have no idea how well string was stored or age of string.I had player pull out very old strings from bag left in trunk of car. Packs covers were cracked and string brittle. I refused to use his. You have that right, as if I used his, they would snap early if it make it to the end of stringing, and player would still blame you for early snap.Things like this is not the norm but it does happen.
One time I strung a racquet full bed Nat. Gut player returned it a week later with string snap. I apologise restring for free , later find out from another player he picked up a stone and hit it with that racquet and string snapped.So charge accordingly, for your services as things do happen.
Post on these boards as there are some great posters here. Your questions will typically be answered.
I tried to cover some of the basics for you.
 
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Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
If Lux ALU / Head MLT are the strings you like best use them and learn to string with them.
Why, because using his production string would help him learn to string? The OP is talking about about learning the ropes. His initial suggestion of using an old racket and cheap string to "learn the ropes" was pretty lauded by everyone here save you.... What possible difference could the string make to someone learning to string? The answer is none. He's getting reps in, that's all.

Gotta wonder about the whole of your "sage" advice.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Why, because using his production string would help him learn to string? The OP is talking about about learning the ropes. His initial suggestion of using an old racket and cheap string to "learn the ropes" was pretty lauded by everyone here save you.... What possible difference could the string make to someone learning to string? The answer is none. He's getting reps in, that's all.

Gotta wonder about the whole of your "sage" advice.
Rabbit said:
If you can't say something helpful, then please STFU.
 

jim e

Legend
Once the new stringer has a few racquets under his belt, he should string with his own string, racquet and tension so he can hit with it to know he did a semblance of a proper job, as no real reason to just string an old racquet over and over with cheap string if same bad string job being done over again.
I think he should learn on his own racquet and string he hits with.and/ or family member racquet.
My first strung job I had a stringer ( the old timer that sold me his machine) , had me string my racquet with the string I typically hit with. That string was Victor Imperial Gut. Fortunately the job went well, and after that 1 racquet I was on my own. He told me if I was able to string that string I should handle any other. That was in 1968, no videos, no USRSA. no internet or nice sites like this one. You learn along the way. And you never stop learning.
Today stringers have a good deal of information on internet, unfortunately some of it is not right, but there is a lot of good as well, like this great site!!
If there is any way op can get a good stringer to spend a little time with him it would be very beneficial
,
 
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jim e

Legend
I must also say Yulittle and @Irvin , Mr. Tennis, has done a remarkable job with all their videos. All done showing proper techniques, and I know a lot of time and effort went into those. I'm sure that they have helped a good number of stringers get to why they are today.
 
Things seem to have gotten heated since I last posted.
I also recommend that you find a local stringer that knows what he is doing to teach you the proper way to string. You should know just what you are doing before you attempt to string someone else's racquet. You should know how to read string patterns so you know the patterns of each racquet that may come your way. Join the USRSA as they have a book called The Digest, that had most racquet frame patterns listed, and they have a technique manual that covers a lot of the basics of stringing. I have had some frames come my way where pattern was not listed in Digest, but being a member I was able to call USRSA and get the proper pattern.
Watch some of Yulittle videos, they are on sticky of these threads.
Beware there are some internet videos that have terrible techniques as well. Yulittle does a nice job on his videos, as he knows what he is doing. @Irvin that is Mr. Tennis also has proper techniques on his videos as well. You will not go wrong watching those two stringers showing you proper way to string. Over time you will still pick up tips and ideas to make the process go better for you. You never stop learning from another fellow stringer.
If you can do a consistent good job each time , over time you get a reputation, but let one poor string job get out and word travels fast.
Stringers don't really make a great amount of money, as many string to be sure their own racquet is done properly, or for there love of the craft, and for the pride of stringing a well done, consistently done job.
You should know how to check over each racquet that comes your way. Get a cracked racquet that you did not notice, and then remove strings, now your responsible from that point on. Stringing places stress on racquet and can snap if there was previous small fracture, I have noticed several cracked racquets over the years, some I told player it is their responsibility, and some I have refused to string. You do not have to string every racquet that you get. Look them over real well.. By not telling player ahead of time, you are now owing someone a new racquet if player was not informed of fracture before you started. How many string jobs to compensate for that error. Also check out each grommet before you start. Cracked grommets you should know how to handle those. Keep proper records and record serial numbers of each racquet you do. I log the date, players name ,phone number, racquet, serial number, string used ,tension used, anything else that is given with racquet, like string dampner, cover, etc. I had one player ask me where the string damper was, told player it was not on racquet. Someone later found it in parking lot of the indoor facility, but you need to know just what is given to you, so have proper records..
Since you are the stringer, you are the expert and should be able to answer any questions on string types and tensions that a player may ask. You have to ask the right questions as to what their game is like. Over time you will learn to string relatively fast, but then talking to player about strings and tensions, thoroughly checking each racquet over, recording proper information, contacting player when job done, even if you get to point where you string in under 30 minutes, the time actually spent with player and racquet all takes time.
Know what strings players in your area use so you can have proper inventory. Someone asks for a particular string and you do not have, you may need to order, takes time, price of string , shipping, , but if player supplies string, you should have policy as you have no idea how well string was stored or age of string.I had player pull out very old strings from bag left in trunk of car. Packs covers were cracked and string brittle. I refused to use his. You have that right, as if I used his, they would snap early if it make it to the end of stringing, and player would still blame you for early snap.Things like this is not the norm but it does happen.
One time I strung a racquet full bed Nat. Gut player returned it a week later with string snap. I apologise restring for free , later find out from another player he picked up a stone and hit it with that racquet and string snapped.So charge accordingly, for your services as things do happen.
Post on these boards as there are some great posters here. Your questions will typically be answered.
I tried to cover some of the basics for you.
I should point out that I don't plan on making stringing my full time profession by any means. I mainly want to pick it up to save money, experiment with string combos, string for friends, and make a buck here or there when I string for other people. I appreciate the advice about logging information and being diligent. I read about that somewhere else and I always appreciated the fact that my old tennis shop would be able to tell me the exact strings and tensions I got when I call them up. As much as learning to string from a certified stringer may be helpful (There is only 1 in my state and I would have to fit with his schedule which I know doesn't mesh with mine very well), I never plan to advertise as a master stringer by any means. I also don't think I would string natural gut. I have yet to meet someone in my area who actually uses natural gut anymore, and if they are willing to shell out the money for it, they should be willing to go to a master stringer who could do that.
 

jim e

Legend
I am not certified, although I could be if I had a reason to. I started before there was a USRSA. Stringing is just a side line for me as well. It is something you can do for years, I know!
You don't need a certified stringer to show you some of the basics. Maybe your local shop you go to.
My real job is dentistry.
I stopped playing and stringing for a while and later wanted to start hitting again, but I found a lack of competent stringers in my area. I mainly got back into it again so my racquets and family racquets are strung properly, and just like before I started getting other hitters racquets, and over time ,more and more racquets come my way to string.You do a good job and you built a reputation and that's true in anything you do.Now I am cutting back as I only have so much free time, but if you do string for others, or even just your own, best to be the best you can at doing it.
 
I am not certified, although I could be if I had a reason to. I started before there was a USRSA. Stringing is just a side line for me as well. It is something you can do for years, I know!
You don't need a certified stringer to show you some of the basics. Maybe your local shop you go to.
My real job is dentistry.
I stopped playing and stringing for a while and later wanted to start hitting again, but I found a lack of competent stringers in my area. I mainly got back into it again so my racquets and family racquets are strung properly, and just like before I started getting other hitters racquets, and over time ,more and more racquets come my way to string.You do a good job and you built a reputation and that's true in anything you do.Now I am cutting back as I only have so much free time, but if you do string for others, or even just your own, best to be the best you can at doing it.
Of course! The only local shops up here are: One with a USRSA certified stringer, a general outdoors store that strung my racquet improperly (multiple missed weaves), and Dick's Sporting Goods. I'm going to try stringing on my own once with my own beater racquet and see how that goes. I do take a lot of pride in what I do, so depending on how it goes, I'll either seek out a more experienced stringer/USRSA certified stringer or continue stringing my own racquets until I feel comfortable stringing other people's.
 

zinzan8

Rookie
It sounds like a number of us on here are just picking up stringing as a hobby, for ourselves, family and friends, and possibly for acquaintances. That’s the case for me, at least. I don’t expect to learn every racquet, string, or string pattern, or be able to give expert advise on strings or string tension, but maybe I’ll pick up some of that knowledge over time as I have started reading almost every new thread in this forum. But mostly I’ll string and advise based only on my experiments and experience, though will happily string for friends with whatever they provide at whatever tension they prefer.

PS, I didn’t have any stringer friends, but when I was shopping for a machine, a seller offered to string a racquet for me and show me the ropes. He said he’d charge me for the stringing, but would deduct that from the cost of the machine if I bought it. I thought that was fair enough.

He scratched my racquet in three places, and the stringing itself was just okay. But it helped me decide to string all my racquets myself from now on, even though I would be self-taught.

I passed on his used machine. He charged me $25; I provided the string. :-/

Still, even with the scratches, was a worthwhile experience.
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Stringing is a very simple task the rules of tennis, common sense, and manufacturers even help you when stringing. The rules say something like a racket can not be less dense in the center of a racket. If the mains get closer together as you go from the center to the outside you made a mistake. If you’re stringing a 16 main racket that should skip 7&9 or 8 and you do not skip the appropriate grommet holes either your mains or crosses will not even look right.

If you mains or crosses are not symmetrical or the crosses are not perpendicular to the centerline of the racket you should know something is wrong.

The manufacturers list stringing patterns for most rackets, and if you can’t find them someone will find them for you.
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
Hi all,

So I have recently purchased a Gamma Progression 2 ELS as I have played tennis for 10+ years and I am sick of paying for +$40 string jobs. The hope is to string my own racquets, friends' racquets, and eventually start doing it as a side hustle for people who don't want to pay $35 bucks to just get cheap synth gut in their racquet. I also hope that stringing my own racquets will allow me to play around with different string combos and tensions without being scared of wasting a ton of money on a string job.

My question is: how would you all recommend building experience stringing? My current set-up for racquets that I actually use is Luxilon ALU Power mains and Head Velocity MLT crosses. I don't think it is a good idea for me to jump straight into stringing those as mess ups would be costly and I am a little worried about damaging my frames or grommets for my first couple of string jobs. I was thinking of buying a reel of Gosen OG Sheep Micro and stringing up an older Volkl that I have a couple of times before trying to string racquets that I actually use. I don't ever use that Volkl anymore, so I am pretty much going to have to cut out the strings over and over which feels somewhat wasteful.

How does that idea sound and would you recommend something different?

Thanks!
I wouldn't even go with OG Sheep. I would order whatever the cheapest reel is on the entire site. A basic nylon will be good enough for practice.
 
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I wouldn't even go with OG Sheep. I would order whatever the cheapest reel is on the entire site. A basic nylon will be good enough for practice.
So again, I mentioned later on in this thread that I am little apprehensive about buying a super cheap string because I don't want to be left with a reel of nylon strings that I would never actually use on my racquet. I felt that I would get a couple of stringings in so that I was comfortable, and then that leftover string I can use to try out in my crosses or for people who just want a cheap synth gut. I wouldn't play with a super cheap nylon in my strings and I wouldn't want to give that to someone either.

Or do you think I should spend the $20 bucks for a nylon reel and just do the 16 string jobs on my old racquet just to get in the reps?
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
I would have it to get the reps in. When I first started I worked at a pro shop and we had a box for half sets that were too short for whatever racket. I learned to string by using scraps and just doing it over and over again. I would also suggest if you have the availability of two rackets to string them one after the other at the same tension and see how one sounds compared to the other. It's not an exact science like a dt reader would actually be, but it will let you know if you are significantly off. Plus getting the reps in will allow you to build a little speed. It will seem tedious at first but by the time you're done with the reel you should be well under an hour per racket on the machine you bought.
 

H22 fan

Rookie
So again, I mentioned later on in this thread that I am little apprehensive about buying a super cheap string because I don't want to be left with a reel of nylon strings that I would never actually use on my racquet. I felt that I would get a couple of stringings in so that I was comfortable, and then that leftover string I can use to try out in my crosses or for people who just want a cheap synth gut. I wouldn't play with a super cheap nylon in my strings and I wouldn't want to give that to someone either.

Or do you think I should spend the $20 bucks for a nylon reel and just do the 16 string jobs on my old racquet just to get in the reps?
I started with my best H22’s, but before I spent a few hours behind a friend stringing my frames at local club. He was doing my frames in less than 20 min a piece, but it took me 1.5 hours at my first try. After 10 frames I was at 45 min, but I am looking for quality not quantity, so I am not rushing as I string only for me and my friends.
 
So just an update on what I decided to purchase:

I decided to get a super cheap reel of Pro's Pro Synth Gut to practice with and potentially string racquets that people don't mind having cheap strings on. I got one set of Gosen OG Sheep Micro so I can try it out myself before I buy a reel.

I purchased a starting clamp and string clippers.

I purchased a couple of poly sets that were on sale that I wouldn't be afraid of damaging a little (Kirschbaum Super Smash, Volkl Cyclone), and a couple of sets of Luxilon Power ALU LE in Lime color because this is the string I actually have used and like.

I got a reel of Head Velocity MLT as this is the string I have in my crosses right now and it is the string I hope to use in my crosses when I try out the other polys.

All my stuff should be here by Monday and hopefully I can get my first stringing in next week!

Thanks everybody for the help so far.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
So just an update on what I decided to purchase:

I decided to get a super cheap reel of Pro's Pro Synth Gut to practice with and potentially string racquets that people don't mind having cheap strings on. I got one set of Gosen OG Sheep Micro so I can try it out myself before I buy a reel.

I purchased a starting clamp and string clippers.

I purchased a couple of poly sets that were on sale that I wouldn't be afraid of damaging a little (Kirschbaum Super Smash, Volkl Cyclone), and a couple of sets of Luxilon Power ALU LE in Lime color because this is the string I actually have used and like.

I got a reel of Head Velocity MLT as this is the string I have in my crosses right now and it is the string I hope to use in my crosses when I try out the other polys.

All my stuff should be here by Monday and hopefully I can get my first stringing in next week!

Thanks everybody for the help so far.
You won’t be sorry except for maybe the starting clamp depending on the one you bought. My guess is the ELS comes with one but I’m not sure. If you bought a Pros’s Pro starting clamp you probably threw you money away.
 

Herb

Semi-Pro
If you just want to practice weaving do not tie off the crosses. String your mains, then string crosses using starting clamp. When you finish pull the crosses back out and go again. If it is cheap string that you are cutting out anyway it is a good way to practice weaving without using a lot of string.
 
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