MichaelHurricane

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Will be epic, may slay.

Panama City Beach, aka capital city of The Redneck Riviera, is in the bullseye for a Category 3, almost 4hit sometime Wednesday. This will be a big one!

Great news for our Carolina friends: the forecast is for Michael to remain very organized even after making landfall and the storm will be causing a windy and wet weekend for an area already battered.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
The hurricane fatigue has set in, I guess. This one is as potentially as nasty as Florence with landfall now projected this afternoon in the Florida Panhandle. Category 4 145 mph winds and storm surges of 14 feet will batter the Redneck Riviera first, then Tallahassee and continue its course through central and southern Georgia and quite heavy rains for already soaked Carolinas residents still recovering from Florence less than a month ago.
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
One of my nephews is in his last semester at UWF and decided to ride it out. His roommates all left a few days ago, he can't now as there is no gasoline to be found. Hopefully he doesn't live on the ground floor.
 

Soul

Semi-Pro
Stay safe everyone in the path of Michael! The storm really blew up quickly. Hope it doesn't cause overwhelming damage as some are predicting this morning.

My home has experienced 2 category 4 hurricanes, with the eye being between 10 to 15 miles and experienced minimal house damage. Hope the same happens for others with this storm.
 

Mr.Lob

G.O.A.T.
Oh, no! Not a direct hit on the Redneck Riviera!!! We have reservations next year. :(

Was about a decade, or more, ago that a hurricane ripped that beach apart. Had about a 4 foot drop off near shoreline, where the sand had been swept away. Was just starting to get back to "normal". o_O
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
One of my nephews is in his last semester at UWF and decided to ride it out. His roommates all left a few days ago, he can't now as there is no gasoline to be found. Hopefully he doesn't live on the ground floor.
He should be OK as the eye has hit quite west of Pensacola and is moving away to the north and east. Along the coast, it's PCB and further east that will get storm surge danger.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
The aerial views of the destruction of Mexico Beach are scary...water to the roofs of some very sizable homes near the beach. Total devastation.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Drone video of the damage is unbelievable. One flew through what used to be a basketball gym with both outer walls behind the rims totally gone to allow the fly through.

Still Category 1 winds and heavy rain as the eye travels through Georgia 13 hours after landfall.
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
Could global warming warm the oceans and eventually cause hurricanes in California?
:(

There are two reasons why tropical cyclones rarely strike California at tropical storm intensity or higher: sea surface temperatures, and the usual upper level steering winds in the eastern Pacific, with sea surface temperatures being more important.
Tropical cyclones usually require very warm water to depth, generally above 26.5 °C (80 °F) extending to a depth of 50 meters (160 ft).[1] However, the waters off California are cold even in summer. They rarely rise above 24 °C (75 °F) in near-shore southern California,[2] and usually remain below 17 °C (63 °F) along most of the rest of the coast and outer coastal waters, although El Niño events may warm the waters somewhat. This is due primarily to the extensive upwelling of colder sub-surface waters caused by the prevailing northwesterly winds acting through the Ekman Effect. The winds drive surface water to the right of the wind flow, that is offshore, which draws water up from below to replace it. The upwelling further cools the already cool California Current which runs north to south along coastal California and even much of coastal Baja California. This is the same mechanism which produces coastal California's characteristic fog.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Incredible devastation at ground zero Mexico Beach. Looks like the aftermath of an air raid bombardment.

Third strongest ever, measuring by the low pressure reading. Easily the strongest this late in the hurricane season. Water temperatures measuring 4-6 degrees Fahrenheit added to its strength and size.
 

bad_call

Legend
Incredible devastation at ground zero Mexico Beach. Looks like the aftermath of an air raid bombardment.

Third strongest ever, measuring by the low pressure reading. Easily the strongest this late in the hurricane season. Water temperatures measuring 4-6 degrees Fahrenheit added to its strength and size.

newer structures built on pilings still standing in Mexico Beach but the cracker box homes built in the 50s and 60s got swept away.
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
newer structures built on pilings still standing in Mexico Beach but the cracker box homes built in the 50s and 60s got swept away.

Generally, what percentage decide not to heed the evacuation warnings? Although I believe in this case the weather forecasters were not predicting this level of storm and people did not have much advance warning as in Florence.

If I was in a modern home away from the ocean I *might* consider staying.

I am assuming all new homes must meet hurricane standards. In any case I would be terrified living in the older homes.
 
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stringertom

Bionic Poster
Generally, what percentage decide not to heed the evacuation warnings? Although I believe in this case the weather forecasters were not predicting this level of storm and people did not have much advance warning as in Florence.

If I was in a modern home away from the ocean I *might* consider staying.

I am assuming all new homes must meet hurricane standards. In any case I would be terrified living in the older homes.
Storm surge is what wiped most of the older homes away that @bad_call os referring to. Newer buildings not on stilts built to more stringent codes survived water surges but there's so much roof damage to even the newer structures while others seem intact, implying a lot of mini microbursts within the storm. It was a crapshoot which experience you were offered. Either way, staying if you had an option to leave is not going to be pleasant for weeks while all the debris is cleared, power is restored and a semblance of normalcy returns. ShangriLa is like Dresden or Berlin after the bombs.
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
Generally, what percentage decide not to heed the evacuation warnings? Although I believe in this case the weather forecasters were not predicting this level of storm and people did not have much advance warning as in Florence.
.

  • Mexico Beach, Florida was “ground zero” for the storm, with entire blocks of homes completely wiped away. At least 280 people stayed in town for the storm, and many were unaccounted for.
:(
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
ap_18284574149825-df4cd7786ef25189b7cab722efcd5c73c312da66-s1300-c85.jpg
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Don't know ... just figured his move to "Florida panhandle" was bad timing.
That was a recent relocation?

The panhandle is 200 miles long so if he was near Destin to Pensacola he was in the safe zone. Inland, the reports I had were that Tallahassee, where I attended high school and college, dodged the bullet. It's mostly coastal areas from PCB east to Appalachicola and St. Mark's that were the danger zone.
 
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