Mile Run

L

Liv3 For It

Guest
#1
How fast can you run a mile?

How fast should a 5'10" 129 pounds, and 16 year old boy run?
 

Moz

Hall of Fame
#3
My best was 4:23 at 28 years old after about 2 years of training, 6'1.5" and 155 lbs, before I had to stop because of respiratory problems.

What are your aspirations? Background?

If you've been training for it you should be around 5 - 5:30 I would have thought.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#4
How fast can you run a mile?

How fast should a 5'10" 129 pounds, and 16 year old boy run?
That entirely depends on your training, not on age or height.

I used to run about 5-7 one milers in 5:00-5:05 minutes each with a 90 second jog between each (72 seconds per lap). This was in prep for the longer distances.

What is your schedule like?
 

Moz

Hall of Fame
#5
That's a nasty session (short recoveries considering the pace) - I presume you were a 10k to 1/2 marathon guy?
 

Noveson

Hall of Fame
#7
A little under five and a half minutes a year or two ago. With little to no training mind you. It was just a PE run. I am sure I could get it close to five....maybe.
 
L

Liv3 For It

Guest
#8
i dont train for it, I was just wondering what a 16 yeAR OLD kid that plays tennis should run t in
 
#13
Are you guys really saying the Truth. My best timing so far has been 7 minutes 5 seconds for 1 mile and 14 minutes 40 seconds for 2 miles.

Though i didnt neccessarily try to beat the timing recently (as these days i am focussing on HIIT ), i am pretty certain that i cant do 4.5 minutes or for that matter even 6 minutes.
 

atatu

Hall of Fame
#14
i dont train for it, I was just wondering what a 16 yeAR OLD kid that plays tennis should run t in
I think 6 minutes would be about right. I ran 4:30 in HS, but I was running track, 22 years later I could still run it in 6 minutes, with just tennis as my training.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#15
That's a nasty session (short recoveries considering the pace) - I presume you were a 10k to 1/2 marathon guy?
5000, 10000m.

Not really nasty, 6-7 one milers and 8-10 1000m reps were pretty standard off-season stuff (considering 90-100 miles per week).

The real nasty one was doing 16 x 400 meters (i have NO leg speed) in the season. My pulse rate would be through the roof. A 60 second (iirc) rest (or maybe 90) after every 4. The rep I ran after the 60 second rest was always worse and slower than the others.
 

Moz

Hall of Fame
#16
Ah, I see. I was coming from the other direction. Good speed, poor stamina. I would have loved the 400's, but had to drop out in the miles!
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#17
The tragedy is that i quit (got a job) before running a marathon. My sunday am run used to be 34 km (about 21 miles) in 2 hours 5 mins each week. At that pace, if i had run 5 more it should have taken less than 2:40.
 
#19
6:20 last summer.. wasn't 'training' for it and was my first shot at doing just 1 mile. I'm sure I could smash that now. So I agree with what was said above, about 6minutes if you're not training for it.
 
#20
I would guess low 6 minutes. I have usually fluctuated between running a 6 and a 7 minute mile, throughout the years. Running a 7 minute mile is definitely not fit enough for good quality tennis. Its not bad, but you will be mediocre at best and will probably fall apart in long matches.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
#21
That must stick in the craw a bit!

Too late for a comeback now?
My doubles partner ran his first marathon at 34 or 35 I think.

Then did 3 or 4 more after.

I don't know how old Sent is.

It is something I would like to do before I die, but I really can't see it happening while I am serious about tennis. So maybe in my next incarnation.

J
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#23
That must stick in the craw a bit!

-- I cry everytime i see the Olympic Games distance runs :-D

Too late for a comeback now?
18 years after quitting running, i started again (now almost 50). Every year I would begin, work up to 45 minutes or an hour, and then something would come up and I'd stop. Each time, the same dream of running a marathon before I die.

I'm in a city that is very crowded, congested and polluted - in the US you prolly cannot imagine such crowds and pollution. Currently, I'm getting a frozen shoulder treated. Just hope I'll be able to play tennis again!
 

dman72

Hall of Fame
#24
I would guess low 6 minutes. I have usually fluctuated between running a 6 and a 7 minute mile, throughout the years. Running a 7 minute mile is definitely not fit enough for good quality tennis. Its not bad, but you will be mediocre at best and will probably fall apart in long matches.

I really don't think that mile time correlates to the type of running you do in tennis. During what points are you running at a slow to moderate pace for SEVEN MINUTES? Never.
 

nadalfan!

Professional
#26
I'm 15 and back in September or October when we did the mile for PE, I got 6:03. I'm sure I could do just as good now or even better. BTW, that was without training before time.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
#27
In college, we ran 6 miles in about 52 minutes....if we wanted a shower before the next class. I know it sounds wierd, but I can't run the ONE mile at all.
But for tennis, I'd recomme the shuttle run of 21' between 8 blocks, run around each alternately.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
#29
No typo, it was crosscountry for PE, a requirement for the crosscountry team, usually done a few periods before CC practice.
I never ran ONE mile because I did school sports since 8th grade, and that was baseball, track (long jump), basketball, and football.
As a 7th grader, I remember doing 880 (yards, I'm old) in high 2's.
Some years at CityCollege of SanFrancisco, I'd take 2 football/basketball PE's, one fencing, and one crosscountry PE.
But back to tennis, a short explosive run with change of direction, starting and stopping, is more important than a 6 minute long steady gait.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
#31
Time for lunch before next class as well.
Sometimes it is good to be one of the slower guys on the team.

When I ran Cross Country we had a strong team and I wasn't any kind of land missile, so they never needed my time.

Which gave me the luxury of adjusting my pace to stay behind a shapely girl without feeling like I was hurting the team. (Damn fast girls were a bummer, I could only keep up with them for the first mile or so and then I was gassed for the rest of the race, and ended up running next to some fat pasty dude who ate too many hard boiled eggs the night before.)

J
 
#33
I did 6:20 back when i was in 10th grade... that was about 3 years ago i believe. I think i can still do that. Im pretty athletic and i do alot of jogging:)
 
#35
I really don't think that mile time correlates to the type of running you do in tennis. During what points are you running at a slow to moderate pace for SEVEN MINUTES? Never.
So you are suggesting that someone who doesn't have enough stamina to run a 7 minute mile could be a good mover in tennis? I highly doubt that.

Just like you get winded if you try to a run a mile faster than your ability, you will get winded if you run down too many tennis shots. I don't think any good, explosive mover who can last a 3 hour+ tennis match would fail to run a 7 minute mile.
 
#38
i am not the fastest sprinter for a mile. When we are talking a 100 mtr dash, i have a lot more speed.

Tennis is more than just speed. Having speed & stamina helps but thats no substitute for Poor footwork, common sense and anticipation.
 

dman72

Hall of Fame
#39
So you are suggesting that someone who doesn't have enough stamina to run a 7 minute mile could be a good mover in tennis? I highly doubt that.

Just like you get winded if you try to a run a mile faster than your ability, you will get winded if you run down too many tennis shots. I don't think any good, explosive mover who can last a 3 hour+ tennis match would fail to run a 7 minute mile.

You're talking about elite level mens, 5 set match pro tennis. That applies to about .000009% of the people who post here.

Judging from the way they look, there are quite a few women on the WTA tour who probably could not crack a 7 minute mile.
 
#40
You're talking about elite level mens, 5 set match pro tennis. That applies to about .000009% of the people who post here.

Judging from the way they look, there are quite a few women on the WTA tour who probably could not crack a 7 minute mile.
Well when my mile time is closer to 6 verses 7, I notice a huge difference in my stamina on court. I'm still playing low levels of tennis. Its just a standard way to measure whether you a fit. In the runner world, 6-mins is pretty slow. If someone can't maintain that type of pace for only 6 minutes, then I don't see how they run down shot after shot in tennis, which I think is harder to do for extended periods of time.

When I was training for a marathon, even though it was a slow pace, I never ever seemed to tire on the tennis court. After 2 hours I still felt like I had alot of energy left.
 
L

Liv3 For It

Guest
#42
7min is not out of shape, but its not going to put you ahead of your peers if you know what I mean. I ran my first 7min mile when I was in like 11 years old.
Yeah, Im fine in the shuttle run and all the other fitness tests just not the mile....never have
 
#43
Yeah, Im fine in the shuttle run and all the other fitness tests just not the mile....never have
Keep in mind that sprinting and long distance endurance running use different types of muscle fibers (fast twitch vs slow twitch). The fast twitch muscles are what help you sprint to balls on the court and have that fast first step.

Your performance in one area (whether strong or weak) will not necessarily determine or influence your performance in the other.
 
#44
Keep in mind that sprinting and long distance endurance running use different types of muscle fibers (fast twitch vs slow twitch). The fast twitch muscles are what help you sprint to balls on the court and have that fast first step.

Your performance in one area (whether strong or weak) will not necessarily determine or influence your performance in the other.
I agree that the mile run will not affect how fast you can move on the court, but if you aren't fit in the mile run, then you will be burned out and out of breath after only a handful of sprints on the court so you won't be able to sprint for long enough to take advantage of your speed anyways.
 
#45
I agree that the mile run will not affect how fast you can move on the court, but if you aren't fit in the mile run, then you will be burned out and out of breath after only a handful of sprints on the court so you won't be able to sprint for long enough to take advantage of your speed anyways.
I'm not disagreeing with that.

Merely pointing out that different types of running employ different things. Many don't realize this, and think that because they can run a marathon, they should be speedy around the court. Not necessarily so...
 
#46
Milers who run under 4 minutes use a combination of fast and slow twitch fibers to essentially sprint the mile. Try running the entire mile at 16 mph! Yes, it's true; the elite miler's pace for the mile is faster than most people's sprint speeds. The elite miler is obviously not going to beat an elite 100 meter specialist in a sprint, but I can guarantee that the elite miler can beat most people in a short sprint.
 
#47
Milers who run under 4 minutes use a combination of fast and slow twitch fibers to essentially sprint the mile. Try running the entire mile at 16 mph! Yes, it's true; the elite miler's pace for the mile is faster than most people's sprint speeds. The elite miler is obviously not going to beat an elite 100 meter specialist in a sprint, but I can guarantee that the elite miler can beat most people in a short sprint.
Yeah I agree. A good long distance runner will still be developed enough to sprint better than most people, even though its not their specialty.
 
#48
The elite miler is obviously not going to beat an elite 100 meter specialist in a sprint, but I can guarantee that the elite miler can beat most people in a short sprint.
yah because most people are fat and out of shape:)

It also depends what you mean by short sprint. At 40 meters - I am not so sure what percentage they could beat, but 400 meters yah they could easily beat >90%.


I ran a 4:32 in high school when I ran track. It was not my best event but not too bad for our team. Now I am probably over 6 minutes, but I am also a lot older and don't train for running:p
 

Moz

Hall of Fame
#49
The world record for the mile stands at 3:43.13.

That's roughly 54.5 seconds per 400m, which is roughly 16 100ms run consecutively in 13.6 seconds each.

Really incredible what they can do.
 
#50
Percentage of people or athletes? If you're talking people, it'll definitely be over 99% even in the 40, but if we're talking athletes, they'll still beat the majority.
 
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