MiStringer review

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by sportmac, Mar 15, 2018.

  1. sportmac

    sportmac Hall of Fame

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    Well he got it early so he dropped it off around 7:30. Of course I couldn't wait so...

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1MvVSvtUnKFwXw_t6wi82EzMQpuPqI2JuQg

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=12J3bC3qoHp3zqUX0MQaOcTCmDMPyssmo4w

    Hopefully you can see those two pics. First one is mains done, 2nd is half way through crosses.

    Initial thoughts:

    Make sure turn table is tight. I thought it was but it came loose so had to give it some extra oomph.

    Mounting the racquet was a bit cumbersome. The screws are underneath so you're blind and it's allen head wrenches so there's some searching going on.
    I had to re-tighten and adjust the racquet multiple times to get it good and snug. There were gaps on the side mounts that were difficult to get rid of.

    Initially the tensioner wouldn't release. It finally did and continued to work after that first hiccup so I don't know if was me or what.

    Looping the string on the tensioner was a bit awkward at first but I got use to it pretty fast.

    Once that was all done, moving on and doing the mains was no problem. So on with the biggie...

    First, there is a whole in the turntable so with some effort it's possible to finger weave almost the entire middle of the racquet. I did a couple but went back to the weave tool just to see if I could get the hang of it.

    I gave up on using it for 3 strings and stuck to 2. After an over hold the string, stick the weave tool in, push through the under and over, remove tool and move to next, push through under and over, repeat.

    Still, I missed a lot of weaves. Next racquet I'll slow down a bit.

    The novelty of course is the clamp system. First time through was a mixed bag for me. It's early doors still but I found it a struggle in the beginning. The clamps themselves are finicky.
    However once you get the hang of them and how you have to have the legs closed to insert them into the pegs then it's pretty easy.

    Anyway, 1 down, 3 to go. I'll probably wait until I'm done with the last 3 so I have some good time on it before I post again.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
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  2. sportmac

    sportmac Hall of Fame

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    All 4 racquets done. Final thoughts.

    Solid enough, tensioner works well, easy to adjust, mains no problem.
    I give that part an A.

    For the crosses I did the last 3 racquets hand weaving most of it. But when you get to the end you need the tool to finish the racquet and also pliers. The tool is useless in the last couple of strings.
    (Good idea to always have the cross come over the first string - after the first few shorter ones. You can then use the tool for the under string then hand weave.)

    If your fingers are long/skinny enough it's not that hard to hand weave but if not then you'd need the tool.
    If you can hand weave I give the crosses a B except toward the end then it gets a C.
    If you have to use the tool I'd give them a C.


    The clamp/peg system is interesting. Figuring out how to use the clamp itself is important. I struggled in the beginning with it but got the hang of it pretty much.
    When it works it's easy peasy but when the right holes to use isn't obvious it takes some effort to find the right ones and get the clamp in them.
    Since there's nothing to compare it to then I'd give it a B if an A were it working flawlessly - grab the clamp, stick it in holes, close.

    I could see it being a hit for guys and gals out there playing the futures and challengers who are stringing their own sticks if for no other reason than it weighs 6 lbs.
    It's definitely not made for speed (I've used DW's and cranks, this is slower) but anyone who needs to string in a hurry isn't going to be considering it anyway.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
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  3. loosegroove

    loosegroove Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for the review. Your experience is pretty much what I expected.

    Has your friend ever strung before? This stringer seems like it would be a tough initiation.
     
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  4. esgee48

    esgee48 Legend

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    Thank you. The basic starter DW is better. What you gain in the tensioning system is really offset by the weaving difficulties. The supports will not help if you can't get them to contact the frame. Oh well, at least they're trying. If someone were to get familiar with this stringer, would they be able to do a frame in 60 minutes?
     
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  5. sportmac

    sportmac Hall of Fame

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    No, he's never strung a racquet and my guess is if we do find one for the kids he never will. :D

    Yeah, we nixed this as a stringer for the young ones. So now I'll try to convince him to spring for a LO or at least consider a DW with a clutch.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2018
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  6. sportmac

    sportmac Hall of Fame

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    That's what I concluded. The tensioner actually is quite nice, I'd say I prefer it to the DW. Though to be honest I haven't strung on a DW since I sold my Klippermate years ago and never strung one with a clutch. Still, there's no getting around the weaving issues.

    I did get better with the supports/frame mounting but you do have to make sure the frame is cradled in them as you tighten. I had to lift the frame while tightening to keep it high enough.
    Still, had some wobbly at the end of each job.

    The last two I was going to time it but of course forgot (I'm old, we forget). I may string another one just for the heck of it just to see how long it takes. Now all I need to do is remember.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2018
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  7. Tennis_dude101

    Tennis_dude101 Rookie

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    Would the mistringer be capable of stringing fan pattern racquets?
     
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  8. sportmac

    sportmac Hall of Fame

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    2 more racquets. It's getting easier and easier.

    Time from cutting the strings to removing the racquet from machine:

    16x19 Prince Lightning 100 only strung once before

    57:22


    16x18 Prince Textreme Tour 100P have strung dozens of times

    50:25

    Finger weaving is no issue until the end of the racquet then you need the weave tool. Finding right holes for clamp also easier, not sure why, but not the struggles I had earlier.

    Getting the hang of it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2018
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  9. onehandbh

    onehandbh Legend

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    How long does it take you to string the 16x18 Prince racquet on a regular stringer?
    That is a pretty open string pattern.

    The tight/cramped spacing for weaving the crosses would rule it out for me.

    I'd rather buy the portable stringer that WTA player Paula Ormaechea uses or the portable Stringway MS140 machine.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 19, 2018
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  10. sportmac

    sportmac Hall of Fame

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    I'd guess around 35/40 minutes on my ST II, never really timed it actually, never been in a hurry. :)

    Just timed this because @esgee48 was wondering.

    I did string the Dunlop Biomimetic Tour on it (18x20) but was using the weave tool to test it out so don't know how the finger weaving would go on the tight pattern. But it's definitely a cramped space. Still, I had no problems with these 2 in weaving but I do have long skinny fingers.

    Yeah, those other two look interesting as well. I don't know if they have no hassle return policy though so tough to try out.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2018
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  11. onehandbh

    onehandbh Legend

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    I don't have a giant hand - can just barely palm a basketball -- , but the photo of the tight space available for weaving crosses, I think for me, I would make stringing the crosses and take too much effort.

    I mostly string for myself. I take my time and enjoy it, usually taking 25-30 minutes per racquet. Been using a stringway and also a Gamma XST before that. Both were really easy to use -- mount, tension, weave.
     
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  12. sportmac

    sportmac Hall of Fame

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    I could finger weave the entire bed except for the last maybe 4 strings but no question the weaving could be problematic for some folks. Also no question it's never going to be as fast as a more traditional approach.

    That's pretty good time for taking your time. Now I'm curious as to how fast I actually do string a racquet.
     
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  13. onehandbh

    onehandbh Legend

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    The racquets I've been restringing have easy patterns and spacing. PS85, Wilson K90, Yonex 95D.

    It took me slightly longer to restring a Head Pro Tour 630 with caps grommets.

    Also took me longer to restring my 110 year old wood racquet, but mostly bc I was afraid I might break it during the stringing process.
     
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  14. eelhc

    eelhc Hall of Fame

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  15. RVAtennisaddict

    RVAtennisaddict Semi-Pro

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    What about for someone who is going to do one racket a month, beginner stringer. Would you consider this?
     
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  16. mmk

    mmk Hall of Fame

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    I look at this as a great tool for people who go to tournaments. If all you are doing is your own stringing once a month, you could get a less expensive dropweight or a used crank machine. It is an interesting design, definitely out of the box thinking went into this.
     
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  17. DE19702

    DE19702 Rookie

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    This thing is great and should get some kind of design award. If I didn't care about the cost I would get one just because it is cool. Even the cross stringing tool is unique. But, people who string their own racquets do care about cost, that's the main reason they string their own racquets.

    There are three potential types of buyers for this machine. First, people who require portability, like players on the challengers tour. Second, people who string at home and want a different machine (repeat buyers) and three, people who don't have a stringer but want one.

    The main reason to get this machine is portability, which is the reason it was designed in the first place. How many people is this? I don't know, but probably not a lot. To them, it is definitely worth the cost and they all should get one. If there are 1,000 of these, then gross sales would only be $379,000. People who string at home already have a machine and the MiStringer does not make the job easier so there wouldn't be much reason to buy it. People who currently don't have a stringer would be a good target but the machine is competing against inexpensive drop weight machines that cost $200 less. However, the clamps and gripper are better on the MiStringer as well as the weight and convenience factor, even when used only in the home. Is that worth $200?

    If the inventor could sell this machine for the cost of a racquet everyone should buy one. Good luck. I hope you sell a million of them.
     
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  18. Jster

    Jster Rookie

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    I am sorry but what is a dw?
     
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  19. jim e

    jim e Legend

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    DW is short for drop weight machine, a dw is different than a lock out , LO machine.
     
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  20. tennisaddict03

    tennisaddict03 New User

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    Did you test this out with a thick poly string? I would foresee some issues trying to weave towards the end and I'd be worried about the tool breaking on some of the tougher strings.
     
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  21. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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