MiStringer review

sportmac

Hall of Fame
Well he got it early so he dropped it off around 7:30. Of course I couldn't wait so...

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1MvVSvtUnKFwXw_t6wi82EzMQpuPqI2JuQg

https://drive.google.com/open?id=12J3bC3qoHp3zqUX0MQaOcTCmDMPyssmo4w

Hopefully you can see those two pics. First one is mains done, 2nd is half way through crosses.

Initial thoughts:

Make sure turn table is tight. I thought it was but it came loose so had to give it some extra oomph.

Mounting the racquet was a bit cumbersome. The screws are underneath so you're blind and it's allen head wrenches so there's some searching going on.
I had to re-tighten and adjust the racquet multiple times to get it good and snug. There were gaps on the side mounts that were difficult to get rid of.

Initially the tensioner wouldn't release. It finally did and continued to work after that first hiccup so I don't know if was me or what.

Looping the string on the tensioner was a bit awkward at first but I got use to it pretty fast.

Once that was all done, moving on and doing the mains was no problem. So on with the biggie...

First, there is a whole in the turntable so with some effort it's possible to finger weave almost the entire middle of the racquet. I did a couple but went back to the weave tool just to see if I could get the hang of it.

I gave up on using it for 3 strings and stuck to 2. After an over hold the string, stick the weave tool in, push through the under and over, remove tool and move to next, push through under and over, repeat.

Still, I missed a lot of weaves. Next racquet I'll slow down a bit.

The novelty of course is the clamp system. First time through was a mixed bag for me. It's early doors still but I found it a struggle in the beginning. The clamps themselves are finicky.
However once you get the hang of them and how you have to have the legs closed to insert them into the pegs then it's pretty easy.

Anyway, 1 down, 3 to go. I'll probably wait until I'm done with the last 3 so I have some good time on it before I post again.
 
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sportmac

Hall of Fame
All 4 racquets done. Final thoughts.

Solid enough, tensioner works well, easy to adjust, mains no problem.
I give that part an A.

For the crosses I did the last 3 racquets hand weaving most of it. But when you get to the end you need the tool to finish the racquet and also pliers. The tool is useless in the last couple of strings.
(Good idea to always have the cross come over the first string - after the first few shorter ones. You can then use the tool for the under string then hand weave.)

If your fingers are long/skinny enough it's not that hard to hand weave but if not then you'd need the tool.
If you can hand weave I give the crosses a B except toward the end then it gets a C.
If you have to use the tool I'd give them a C.


The clamp/peg system is interesting. Figuring out how to use the clamp itself is important. I struggled in the beginning with it but got the hang of it pretty much.
When it works it's easy peasy but when the right holes to use isn't obvious it takes some effort to find the right ones and get the clamp in them.
Since there's nothing to compare it to then I'd give it a B if an A were it working flawlessly - grab the clamp, stick it in holes, close.

I could see it being a hit for guys and gals out there playing the futures and challengers who are stringing their own sticks if for no other reason than it weighs 6 lbs.
It's definitely not made for speed (I've used DW's and cranks, this is slower) but anyone who needs to string in a hurry isn't going to be considering it anyway.
 
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loosegroove

Hall of Fame
Thanks for the review. Your experience is pretty much what I expected.

Has your friend ever strung before? This stringer seems like it would be a tough initiation.
 

esgee48

Legend
Thank you. The basic starter DW is better. What you gain in the tensioning system is really offset by the weaving difficulties. The supports will not help if you can't get them to contact the frame. Oh well, at least they're trying. If someone were to get familiar with this stringer, would they be able to do a frame in 60 minutes?
 

sportmac

Hall of Fame
Thanks for the review. Your experience is pretty much what I expected.

Has your friend ever strung before? This stringer seems like it would be a tough initiation.
No, he's never strung a racquet and my guess is if we do find one for the kids he never will. :D

Yeah, we nixed this as a stringer for the young ones. So now I'll try to convince him to spring for a LO or at least consider a DW with a clutch.
 
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sportmac

Hall of Fame
Thank you. The basic starter DW is better. What you gain in the tensioning system is really offset by the weaving difficulties. The supports will not help if you can't get them to contact the frame. Oh well, at least they're trying. If someone were to get familiar with this stringer, would they be able to do a frame in 60 minutes?
That's what I concluded. The tensioner actually is quite nice, I'd say I prefer it to the DW. Though to be honest I haven't strung on a DW since I sold my Klippermate years ago and never strung one with a clutch. Still, there's no getting around the weaving issues.

I did get better with the supports/frame mounting but you do have to make sure the frame is cradled in them as you tighten. I had to lift the frame while tightening to keep it high enough.
Still, had some wobbly at the end of each job.

The last two I was going to time it but of course forgot (I'm old, we forget). I may string another one just for the heck of it just to see how long it takes. Now all I need to do is remember.
 
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sportmac

Hall of Fame
2 more racquets. It's getting easier and easier.

Time from cutting the strings to removing the racquet from machine:

16x19 Prince Lightning 100 only strung once before

57:22


16x18 Prince Textreme Tour 100P have strung dozens of times

50:25

Finger weaving is no issue until the end of the racquet then you need the weave tool. Finding right holes for clamp also easier, not sure why, but not the struggles I had earlier.

Getting the hang of it.
 
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onehandbh

Legend
16x18 Prince Textreme Tour 100P have strung dozens of times

50:25
How long does it take you to string the 16x18 Prince racquet on a regular stringer?
That is a pretty open string pattern.

The tight/cramped spacing for weaving the crosses would rule it out for me.

I'd rather buy the portable stringer that WTA player Paula Ormaechea uses or the portable Stringway MS140 machine.
 
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sportmac

Hall of Fame
How long does it take you to string the 16x18 Prince racquet on a regular stringer?
That is a pretty open string pattern.

The tight/cramped spacing for weaving the crosses would rule it out for me.

I'd rather buy the portable stringer that WTA player Paula Ormaechea uses or the portable Stringway MS140 machine.

https://www.tmstringer.com/products/tms-progressive-06-box-stringing-machine

http://www.stringway-shop.eu/epages/262587.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/262587/Products/"SW MS140L Pro Traveller"/SubProducts/"MS140L Pro Traveller"
I'd guess around 35/40 minutes on my ST II, never really timed it actually, never been in a hurry. :)

Just timed this because @esgee48 was wondering.

I did string the Dunlop Biomimetic Tour on it (18x20) but was using the weave tool to test it out so don't know how the finger weaving would go on the tight pattern. But it's definitely a cramped space. Still, I had no problems with these 2 in weaving but I do have long skinny fingers.

Yeah, those other two look interesting as well. I don't know if they have no hassle return policy though so tough to try out.
 
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onehandbh

Legend
But it's definitely a cramped space. Still, I had no problems with these 2 in weaving but I do have long skinny fingers.
I don't have a giant hand - can just barely palm a basketball -- , but the photo of the tight space available for weaving crosses, I think for me, I would make stringing the crosses and take too much effort.

I mostly string for myself. I take my time and enjoy it, usually taking 25-30 minutes per racquet. Been using a stringway and also a Gamma XST before that. Both were really easy to use -- mount, tension, weave.
 

sportmac

Hall of Fame
I don't have a giant hand - can just barely palm a basketball -- , but the photo of the tight space available for weaving crosses, I think for me, I would make stringing the crosses and take too much effort.

I mostly string for myself. I take my time and enjoy it, usually taking 25-30 minutes per racquet. Been using a stringway and also a Gamma XST before that. Both were really easy to use -- mount, tension, weave.
I could finger weave the entire bed except for the last maybe 4 strings but no question the weaving could be problematic for some folks. Also no question it's never going to be as fast as a more traditional approach.

That's pretty good time for taking your time. Now I'm curious as to how fast I actually do string a racquet.
 

onehandbh

Legend
That's pretty good time for taking your time. Now I'm curious as to how fast I actually do string a racquet.
The racquets I've been restringing have easy patterns and spacing. PS85, Wilson K90, Yonex 95D.

It took me slightly longer to restring a Head Pro Tour 630 with caps grommets.

Also took me longer to restring my 110 year old wood racquet, but mostly bc I was afraid I might break it during the stringing process.
 

mmk

Hall of Fame
What about for someone who is going to do one racket a month, beginner stringer. Would you consider this?
I look at this as a great tool for people who go to tournaments. If all you are doing is your own stringing once a month, you could get a less expensive dropweight or a used crank machine. It is an interesting design, definitely out of the box thinking went into this.
 

DE19702

Rookie
This thing is great and should get some kind of design award. If I didn't care about the cost I would get one just because it is cool. Even the cross stringing tool is unique. But, people who string their own racquets do care about cost, that's the main reason they string their own racquets.

There are three potential types of buyers for this machine. First, people who require portability, like players on the challengers tour. Second, people who string at home and want a different machine (repeat buyers) and three, people who don't have a stringer but want one.

The main reason to get this machine is portability, which is the reason it was designed in the first place. How many people is this? I don't know, but probably not a lot. To them, it is definitely worth the cost and they all should get one. If there are 1,000 of these, then gross sales would only be $379,000. People who string at home already have a machine and the MiStringer does not make the job easier so there wouldn't be much reason to buy it. People who currently don't have a stringer would be a good target but the machine is competing against inexpensive drop weight machines that cost $200 less. However, the clamps and gripper are better on the MiStringer as well as the weight and convenience factor, even when used only in the home. Is that worth $200?

If the inventor could sell this machine for the cost of a racquet everyone should buy one. Good luck. I hope you sell a million of them.
 

Jster

Professional
Thank you. The basic starter DW is better. What you gain in the tensioning system is really offset by the weaving difficulties. The supports will not help if you can't get them to contact the frame. Oh well, at least they're trying. If someone were to get familiar with this stringer, would they be able to do a frame in 60 minutes?
I am sorry but what is a dw?
 
Did you test this out with a thick poly string? I would foresee some issues trying to weave towards the end and I'd be worried about the tool breaking on some of the tougher strings.
 

gn8

New User
To those using the MiStringer, how have you found the tension accuracy?
I just did my first racquet with it and used the center of the tension slider as my desired tension and it turned out waaay tighter then expected
Maybe there is a way to calibrate it?
 

ruedacalvo

New User
[QUOTE = "gn8, post: 13140297, miembro: 13693"] Para aquellos que usan el MiStringer, ¿cómo encontró la precisión de la tensión?
Acabo de hacer mi primera raqueta con ella y utilicé el centro del control deslizante de tensión como la tensión deseada y resultó más apretado de lo esperado.
Tal vez hay una manera de calibrarlo? [/ QUOTE]
Tengo el mismo problema.
¿Hay alguna solución?
 

Tennis_dude101

Semi-Pro
Tengo el mismo problema.
¿Hay alguna solución?
Mi sugerencia sería ensartar a una tensión más baja. Las pinzas deben estar funcionando muy bien. No hablo español, así que espero que el traductor de Google haya funcionado bien. ;)
TD

PS.
In English:
My suggestion would be to string at a lower tension. The clamps must be working very well. I don't speak spanish so I hope google translate did its job ok.
 

Wace

New User
I strung my very first racquet ever using the MiStringer this past weekend. I strung a Wilson Blade 98, 18x20 with Solinco Hyper-G (16G). I bought this stringer because I wanted a home stringing machine (for the love of tinkering) - and I like niche products / designs. The compactness is great too.

Overall, it was fun and worked pretty well. Set up was pretty easy, but I'd prefer 'wing-nut' style over the allen key setup for mounting the racquet. I found stringing the crosses difficult and time consuming! Given, I need to learn to be more efficient. I tried using the provided tool, but found weaving with my fingers easier and quicker. Towards the end (last 4 crosses) it got really tough, and I ended up using the hook on my pen-knife to pull the string up. Looking for a better and quicker solution here (maybe StringWeaver as mentioned above).

I strung at 55lbs, but the string-bed seemed a lot stiffer than I was expecting.

Two concerns:
1. The tensioner puts a bit of a kink in the string. Wondering if this affects performance.
2. The lock clamps pinched my string, leaving markings. I performed the calibration upfront of loosening until the string slips, then tightening 1/8 of an inch until it stops the string from slipping. Wondering if this affects performance.
 

ruedacalvo

New User
[QUOTE = "Tennis_dude101, post: 13229664, miembro: 666430"] Mi sugerencia sería ensartar a una tensión más baja. Las pinzas deben estar funcionando muy bien. No hablo español, así que espero que el traductor de Google haya funcionado bien.;)
TD

PD.
En inglés:
Mi sugerencia sería ensartar a una tensión más baja. Las pinzas deben estar funcionando muy bien. No hablo español, así que espero que el traductor de Google haya funcionado bien. [/ QUOTE]
Gracias
 

glooka

New User
I have just received the stringer and finally got to string my first racquet ever. Along with the instructional videos from their website and the video from Tennis Warehouse (TW) I have top say there was a little learning curve BUT that was expected. I share the same experience as Sport Mac. Anyone who is new to stringing like me (1 frame done) should watch the MiStringer videos a couple of times just to get familiar with everything. That's all it takes until you get to the actual stringing. TW video explains everything PERFECTLY and the stringer really is a please to work with (once again I never strung before ion my life). Total time investment 1 hour and 15 minutes including learning how to loop and double loop the knots.
Reason for purchasing: I got tired of depending from someone else to string my frames. I rotate 3 frames and break strings once a month or so.
(A) Closest store is 20/25 minutes away; they do a great job. Costs me $30/35 (labor and strings) plus 2 trips.
(B) At my tennis club I had a coach who did a fantastic job for $20 (labor) + my own strings. Consistent work. He left. Bummer.
(C) I tried two different coaches and their string job has been all over the place. I asked for 54 pounds and I think I got 48/50 at best. Waste of money and there is no way to argue since their machine is calibrated who knows how. That's an argument no one is going to win.
So, I wanted to learn and be independent.
Now the stringer.
Racquet/Strings: I did a standard 2 piece stringing method, with my usual Prince SynthGut Duraflex 17 gauge for the whole job as I didn't want to waste better strings in case I messed up. Doing a Hybrid job would be just the same. Racquet is a Wilson Blade 98 18x20.
Tools: Definitely need a owl, needle noose pliers (preferably bent nose) and cutting pliers. I bought a owl kit from Home Depot and it worked well. TW has the tools as well.
Mounting the stringer: Easy enough
Mounting the racquet: Easy, really easy. make sure you have 2 corners of a table open and room to swing the frame back and forth
Stringing the Mains: not difficult, just make sure whether you need to start from the bottom (throat) or the top of the frame. TW video explains well.
Clamps: takes some time to ensure they are always positioned well enough to grip on all 4 holes. Sometimes you need try a few times. Key is to ensure they are tight enough to hold the string BUT not to tonight to pinch and damage it. Overall: MEDIUM difficulty. Small learning curve. I was up and running in 10 minutes. it gets easier quickly.
Stringing the Crosses: Need to learn how to tie a knot and a couple loop knot. You'll have a lot more string to weave at the beginning and it's a bit cumbersome. I did not use the weaving tool (I think its a waste of time just looking t the video), even though I have a bit hand and not so thin/long fingers. I was able to weave manually and pull the strings with my fingers, sometimes with needle noose pliers. Overall: MEDIUM difficulty and a bit tedious.
Pulling mechanism: Easy to set, easy to pull, it locks when it reaches the desired weight/tension and it stays locked. Just make sure you always loop the string as the video shows, and to not pinch the string in the pull mechanism (easy to do if not paying attention).
Tension Accuracy: I originally applied 55 pounds to my frame even though I play at 54. Reason being I did not know how accurate the pulling mechanism was going to be. Surprisingly, the strings felt just as they should and I tested the racquet the very morning after stringing. Overall: It seems VERY accurate. My next job will definitely be @ 54. I plan to do Hibryd with MultiFilament 18 gauge (Solinco X-Natural or Volk V-Twist / Power Fiber II) on the Mains and Prince SynthGut 17 on the crosses.
All in all I am extremely happy with the stringer. It's easy to mount, easy to put away. Hopefully it will last a few years.
 
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Tennease

Legend
I have just received the stringer and finally got to string my first racquet ever. Along with the instructional videos from their website and the video from Tennis Warehouse (TW) I have top say there was a little learning curve BUT that was expected. I share the same experience as Sport Mac. Anyone who is new to stringing like me (1 frame done) should watch the MiStringer videos a couple of times just to get familiar with everything. That's all it takes until you get to the actual stringing. TW video explains everything PERFECTLY and the stringer really is a please to work with (once again I never strung before ion my life). Total time investment 1 hour and 15 minutes including learning how to loop and double loop the knots.
Reason for purchasing: I got tired of depending from someone else to string my frames. I rotate 3 frames and break strings once a month or so.
(A) Closest store is 20/25 minutes away; they do a great job. Costs me $30/35 (labor and strings) plus 2 trips.
(B) At my tennis club I had a coach who did a fantastic job for $20 (labor) + my own strings. Consistent work. He left. Bummer.
(C) I tried two different coaches and their string job has been all over the place. I asked for 54 pounds and I think I got 48/50 at best. Waste of money and there is no way to argue since their machine is calibrated who knows how. That's an argument no one is going to win.
So, I wanted to learn and be independent.
Now the stringer.
Racquet/Strings: I did a standard 2 piece stringing method, with my usual Prince SynthGut Duraflex 17 gauge for the whole job as I didn't want to waste better strings in case I messed up. Doing a Hybrid job would be just the same. Racquet is a Wilson Blade 98 18x20.
Tools: Definitely need a owl, needle noose pliers (preferably bent nose) and cutting pliers. I bought a owl kit from Home Depot and it worked well. TW has the tools as well.
Mounting the stringer: Easy enough
Mounting the racquet: Easy, really easy. make sure you have 2 corners of a table open and room to swing the frame back and forth
Stringing the Mains: not difficult, just make sure whether you need to start from the bottom (throat) or the top of the frame. TW video explains well.
Clamps: takes some time to ensure they are always positioned well enough to grip on all 4 holes. Sometimes you need try a few times. Key is to ensure they are tight enough to hold the string BUT not to tonight to pinch and damage it. Overall: MEDIUM difficulty. Small learning curve. I was up and running in 10 minutes. it gets easier quickly.
Stringing the Crosses: Need to learn how to tie a knot and a couple loop knot. You'll have a lot more string to weave at the beginning and it's a bit cumbersome. I did not use the weaving tool (I think its a waste of time just looking t the video), even though I have a bit hand and not so thin/long fingers. I was able to weave manually and pull the strings with my fingers, sometimes with needle noose pliers. Overall: MEDIUM difficulty and a bit tedious.
Pulling mechanism: Easy to set, easy to pull, it locks when it reaches the desired weight/tension and it stays locked. Just make sure you always loop the string as the video shows, and to not pinch the string in the pull mechanism (easy to do if not paying attention).
Tension Accuracy: I originally applied 55 pounds to my frame even though I play at 54. Reason being I did not know how accurate the pulling mechanism was going to be. Surprisingly, the strings felt just as they should and I tested the racquet the very morning after stringing. Overall: It seems VERY accurate. My next job will definitely be @ 54. I plan to do Hibryd with MultiFilament 18 gauge (Solinco X-Natural or Volk V-Twist / Power Fiber II) on the Mains and Prince SynthGut 17 on the crosses.
All in all I am extremely happy with the stringer. It's easy to mount, easy to put away. Hopefully it will last a few years.
I look at the instructional videos, and I'm wondering if a 90 square inch racquet would fit in the MiStringer?
 

SizaKomm

New User
Hey guys, I've got the mistringer aswell and whenever i turn the turntable it starts to wobble so i have to retighten it every half a turn.
Does anyone else experience this?? Does anyone have a suggestion as for how to fix it??
 

glooka

New User
I look at the instructional videos, and I'm wondering if a 90 square inch racquet would fit in the MiStringer?
sorry for the super late reply, I missed your note somehow. I would contact their support either via FB or email. Perhaps TW might be able to answer for you.
 

glooka

New User
Hey guys, I've got the mistringer aswell and whenever i turn the turntable it starts to wobble so i have to retighten it every half a turn.
Does anyone else experience this?? Does anyone have a suggestion as for how to fix it??
Hi, I do remember the mounting plate wobbling a little bit but not much. I can't tell how much wobbling you are experiencing though (maybe post video on YouTube?) Make sure the bolt is not stripped and it reaches all the way down. If not, can you add a washer? Worst case scenario do contact MiStringer support, you may be able to get a new bolt.
 

SizaKomm

New User
Hi, I do remember the mounting plate wobbling a little bit but not much. I can't tell how much wobbling you are experiencing though (maybe post video on YouTube?) Make sure the bolt is not stripped and it reaches all the way down. If not, can you add a washer? Worst case scenario do contact MiStringer support, you may be able to get a new bolt.
Its actually not a bolt that i have to retighten, its the nut under the turnatable.
 

SizaKomm

New User
That must mean that if you go under your machine, then your machine will have a loose nut under it , or is it the other way around
Thanks a lot, i tightened it properly with a tool, not my finger today, and so far there are no signs of wobblines
 

Clash Ah ah

Rookie
I suppose you could use it, but i wouldnt really call it useful, as I find handweaving easier and faster even on the mistringer. Although it could be because i cant use it really well...
Thanks never strung a racquet before and looking to buy a machine and thought that gizmo may make it quicker and easier.
 

sportmac

Hall of Fame
An update on this. I haven't used it since I the kids took it but they had a problem which I got involved with since my name is on the purchase.

The tensioner got jammed and the guys at MiStringers sent out a replacement instead of having to send it back in for repair. Very nice.

Once the replacement part came I decided to string 2 racquets on it just because. Mounted the first one and before I started I decided to run down to the hardware store and buy thumb screws for the frame mounts to see if I could replace the allen head ones. I was worried about the clearance when rotating the frame but there's just enough clearance with an added washer for the sides.
Works like a charm.

So strung both of them using the provided tool for the crosses and after the first two crosses got the groove back and whipped through them. I like the tool and even though my fingers are long and skinny enough to use without it the tool is a bit faster for me.

I still think it's a cool little machine for stringing your own racquets, especially if you need to be mobile with it. I couldn't do what the kids are doing (they're stringing theirs, their dads and for friends, they estimate they've done over 20) but they're 13 and 9. What do they know? :)

So it's back with them.

Some pics with the thumb screws:


Side note: I also noticed some space opening up between the side mounts. Is this a big deal? Since there are quite a few machines that only have mounts at the end I was wondering about this. Anybody have any insight?
 
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Ten.Is

Rookie
I recently purchased this stringer and have strung two racquets so far. Have you tested the tension of the strings by any chance?
 

lars4tennis

New User
I have this machine and it is good for me as I only do mine but now it's chewing up the strings if I'm not very careful.
The problem appears to be when I loop around the tensioner. The string is slipping underneath and if you apply tension it will chew up the string a little.

I have to be extra careful on each string before I tension and make sure it doesn't go under it.

This is a recent development. Has anyone else experienced this?
 
I look at this as a great tool for people who go to tournaments. If all you are doing is your own stringing once a month, you could get a less expensive dropweight or a used crank machine. It is an interesting design, definitely out of the box thinking went into this.
Do you have any suggestions on a good cheap drop weight/crank machine? It looks like this one is at $330 right now.
 
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