Mixed Bag - Second String Garden Variety Classics

#1
If you had to choose 4 classic racquets from 4 different manufacturers that you would be sentenced to play with for the rest of your days, what would they be?
Excluding Dunlop Max200G, Wilson Pro Staff/Ultra, Prince Original Graphite, Fischer, Head, Kneissl, Donnay, Rossignol, Estusa, Puma, Adidas, Volkl and Yonex (most of the usual suspects).
Of the racquets I own these would be my choices.
Spalding Big Bow.
Yamaha White Laser 90 (probably the same as the Yamaha White Gold 90).
Pro Kennex Silver Ace (my version is branded as a Golden Team Champion Pro).
Slazenger Silver Phantom Boron ( identical to the Dunlop Black Max I believe).
Hit me with your picks.
chevron gas station near me
 
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galain

Hall of Fame
#2
Taking all hose manufacturers out makes it a pretty limited choice!

I'll go with the sticks I was always curious to try but never got a chance to.

Spalding's GC30, Le Coq Sportif's TF40, Snauwaert's Hi Ten 30 and the Donnay Graphite Borg mid.
 
#3
Taking all hose manufacturers out makes it a pretty limited choice!

I'll go with the sticks I was always curious to try but never got a chance to.

Spalding's GC30, Le Coq Sportif's TF40, Snauwaert's Hi Ten 30 and the Donnay Graphite Borg mid.
Taking all of those models/manufacturers out is my deliberate and transparent attempt to find people’s second tier favourites that are lesser well known for their performance/quality, and that I should keep an eye out for.
 
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#5
Let’s see, I believe I would select the Lacoste “Equijet,” the Snauwaert Hi-Ten 25, Hi-Ten 30, and Hi-Ten 50.

When my knees give out, I’ll sell them and use the proceeds to fund the knee replacement surgery, then return to playing with Head, Fischer, Wilson, Kneissl, Pro Kennex, and Prince racquets!
 
#6
Thanks all. Keep the suggestions coming, although let’s try and keep the rare and expensive frames out of contention.
The affordable and easily findable models list flushed out so far would then be:
Spalding GC30
Donnay Graphite Borg Mid (though I excluded Donnay, I changed my mind and am going to let them in)
Yamaha Secret/Proto 04
Slazenger Panther Pro Ceramic
Mizuno Pro Classic
Snauwaert La Grande (similar to the Spalding Big Bow)
 
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#8
I’m with @retrowagen on the equijet - I would plump for the LT301.
Other tier 2s I’d stick in the bag:
  1. Dunlop MW200G
  2. Prince Comp
  3. Tec T-Fight 325 (texalium)(assuming the 315 LTD is off limits)
  4. Vantage VT001 (assuming we can’t pick Angells)
  5. Yamaha Secret Ex
Edited because I didn’t read the rules right - if the Prince and Dunlop are also verboten please feel free to disregard...
 
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#10
Thanks for the new suggestions.
Keeping the list going and sticking with my bias of 1980’s style mid/mid plus head size racquets I know I have a hope of stumbling across for cheap.
Spalding GC30
Donnay Graphite Borg Mid
Yamaha Secret/Proto 04
Slazenger Panther Pro Ceramic
Mizuno Pro Classic
Snauwaert La Grande (I have one already)
Prince Mono (it’s pushing the mid plus limits I know)
Prince Comp
Yamaha Secret EX (I have an oversize version but not the mid plus)
 
#11
If you had to choose 4 classic racquets from 4 different manufacturers that you would be sentenced to play with for the rest of your days, what would they be?
Excluding Dunlop Max200G, Wilson Pro Staff/Ultra, Prince Original Graphite, Fischer, Head, Kneissl, Donnay, Rossignol, Estusa, Puma, Adidas, Volkl and Yonex (most of the usual suspects).
Of the racquets I own these would be my choices.
Spalding Big Bow.
Yamaha White Laser 90 (probably the same as the Yamaha White Gold 90).
Pro Kennex Silver Ace (my version is branded as a Golden Team Champion Pro).
Slazenger Silver Phantom Boron ( identical to the Dunlop Black Max I believe).
Hit me with your picks.
chevron gas station near me
The Slazenger Phantom Boron is the same mold as the Dunlop Black Max II, Silver Max, Max Competion, and Slazenger Panther Pro Ceramic to name a coupe
 
#16
Thanks for keeping the suggestions coming everyone. It’s a real education. Some I’ve never heard of, or seen before. The Chris 5 Star has been mentioned twice now - it must be good. I’ve seen maybe one Deesse in my lifetime here, but the rest of the “oddballs” are all new to me.
Updating again and including the possible easier acquisitions that are to my era tastes, as well as my original four.
Spalding GC30
Donnay Graphite Borg Mid
Yamaha Secret/Proto 04
Slazenger Panther Pro Ceramic (and its shared mould brethren)
Mizuno Pro Classic
Snauwaert La Grande
Prince Mono
Prince Comp
Yamaha Secret EX
Yamaha Gold 100
Pro Kennex Micro Mid (my Micro Control could easily be swapped out for any of the others on my list)
Fox Grey Fox (maybe not an impossibility to find in my “neck of the woods”, but pretty close I would think)
Pro Kennex Ceramic Destiny (a bit too recent for my tastes, but it’s been mentioned twice too now)
Spalding Big Bow
Yamaha White Gold/Laser 90
Slazenger Silver Phantom Boron/Dunlop Black Max
 
#17
My actual shortlist would be as follows:
Wimbledon 100% Graphite (90; the Pernfors/Nystrom frame, and just a great frame for all styles of play)
Snauwaert Golden Mid (a graphite-fiberglass-Kevlar-wood composite mid with truly sublime ball feel)
Yamaha Secret 04 (the best widebody frame ever made)
Spalding ATP Tour Pro Stock 200 (Prestige Classic 600 clone, though braided and non-CAP!)
 
#18
Okay, how about some classic 80s and 90s Bridgestone...forgotten beauties indeed...

Bridgestone Hyperaero RV10 and RV2

Bridgestone RS 105A

Bridgestone B10/01 (there's a brand new old stock one on fleabay now) and the 02 and 03 as well...

Bridgestone Techbeam beautiful and rare, yellow and black attack! (Google it it's beautiful!!)
 
#19
Thanks retrowagen. I like the sound and look of all those.

Thanks Tennis Dunce. Too many beautiful looking Bridgestones to contemplate. Although if anyone feels tempted there’s plenty of them available from Rakuten in Japan (pages and pages of second hand ones).
https://global.rakuten.com/en/search/?k=Bridgestone&tl=208012&used=1&f=1

Spalding GC30
Donnay Graphite Borg Mid
Yamaha Secret/Proto 04
Slazenger Panther Pro Ceramic (and its shared mould brethren)
Mizuno Pro Classic
Snauwaert La Grande
Prince Mono
Prince Comp
Yamaha Secret EX
Yamaha Gold 100
Pro Kennex Micro Mid
Fox Grey Fox
Pro Kennex Ceramic Destiny
Spalding Big Bow
Yamaha White Gold/Laser 90
Slazenger Silver Phantom Boron/Dunlop Black Max
Wimbledon 100% Graphite 90
Snauwaert Golden Mid (this one looks great)
Spalding ATP Tour Pro Stock 200
 
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#22
Thanks retrowagen. I like the sound and look of all those.

Thanks Tennis Dunce. Too many beautiful looking Bridgestones to contemplate. Although if anyone feels tempted there’s plenty of them available from Rakuten in Japan (pages and pages of second hand ones).
https://global.rakuten.com/en/search/?k=Bridgestone&tl=208012&used=1&f=1

Spalding GC30
Donnay Graphite Borg Mid
Yamaha Secret/Proto 04
Slazenger Panther Pro Ceramic (and its shared mould brethren)
Mizuno Pro Classic
Snauwaert La Grande
Prince Mono
Prince Comp
Yamaha Secret EX
Yamaha Gold 100
Pro Kennex Micro Mid
Fox Grey Fox
Pro Kennex Ceramic Destiny
Spalding Big Bow
Yamaha White Gold/Laser 90
Slazenger Silver Phantom Boron/Dunlop Black Max
Wimbledon 100% Graphite 90
Snauwaert Golden Mid (this one looks great)
Spalding ATP Tour Pro Stock 200
Thanks for that Bridgestone link, I'm certainly very interested in legacy near mint Bridgestones, (as well as 1st generation Blade what?? 2009???) I'd love to get fresh B stencils on all too lol.
I know, it's frustrating that old and new Bridgestones are Everywhere in the orient but hardly any to be found in U.S. in any condition. Definitely a gaping hole in my collection.
My vote would be the Yamaha Ex97 Resonance if I had to pick one...that is one sweet frame. Has to be 25 years ahead of it's time.
 
#24
Thanks again for the latest contributions.
As luck would have it I stumbled across one of Ronaldo’s recommendations today. It cost me $3. The book was an extra $1. It has some great tips/techniques for the older school players amongst us - using the hammer grip (which I’d never heard of before) for return of service on both sides (a Pancho Gonzalez grip) for example. Seeing as I’ve always been crap at return of serve, I think I’m going to give it a try.
 
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#25
Thanks again for the latest contributions.
As luck would have it I stumbled across one of Ronaldo’s recommendations today. It cost me $3. The book was an extra $1. It has some great tips/techniques for the older school players amongst us - using the hammer grip (which I’d never heard of before) for return of service on both sides (a Pancho Gonzalez grip) for example. Seeing as I’ve always been crap at return of serve, I think I’m going to give it a try.
For your return woes, try abbreviating your backswing, and using your body to put the ball deep but well in.
 
#34
Look at the names! There sure were a lot of great Aussie players in the 50's, 60's, and 70's. Hoad, Court, Emerson, Laver. All are undoubtedly among the top 20 players of all time.
When I get back home (I’m currently on holidays for a couple of weeks), I can take photos of the pertinent chapters that discuss techniques for particular shots and post these at say a chapter a week - if that’s of any interest to anyone. There’s some great tips if you play an “old school” game, and fascinating stories and analysis by each of the chapters authors about their contemporaries.
 
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#39
Back in the early 80s the YFG50 was a stiff racquet unless compared to those 100% graphites. That red YFG30 was the wet noodle. Most of us were using metal racquets back then
We sold quite a few of the red and the black YFG30 and I played the 50 for a while in the late '70s. When NC State came to play South Carolina, three of their players used the 30(IIRC, John Sadri was one with that rocket serve of his!!). Nice "whistle" as they moved through the air! As was the case with many rackets of the day, TOO many main strings and I believe we "improved" the YFG series by leaving out one main on either side and stringing it like a "modern" frame instead of a wood one.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
#40
We sold quite a few of the red and the black YFG30 and I played the 50 for a while in the late '70s. When NC State came to play South Carolina, three of their players used the 30(IIRC, John Sadri was one with that rocket serve of his!!). Nice "whistle" as they moved through the air! As was the the framecase with many rackets of the day, TOO many main strings and I believe we "improved" the YFG series by leaving out one main on either side and stringing it like a "modern" frame instead of a wood one.
Did the name denote how much graphite was in? YFG30=30%
 
#41
When I get back home (I’m currently on holidays for a couple of weeks), I can take photos of the pertinent chapters that discuss techniques for particular shots and post these at say a chapter a week - if that’s of any interest to anyone. There’s some great tips if you play an “old school” game, and fascinating stories and analysis by each of the chapters authors about their contemporaries.
I'll look for that book on the Internet Archive I bet it's on there. I know there's a GREAT Jimmy Connors instructional book from like 1986 with loads of pics and great tips on there. Check it out.
 
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