Momentum vs "in the moment"

#1
It just occurred to me that there is a contradiction between using/countering momentum and playing "in the moment": if I work at playing one point at a time and having a short memory, how would I harness momentum? Doesn't that require integrating the past?

I suppose what I do is to keep track of what's working and what's not working and to try and do more of the former and less of the latter. But if I'm truly "in the moment", a concept like momentum, which relies on the past, seems contradictory.

What am I viewing incorrectly?
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
#2
It just occurred to me that there is a contradiction between using/countering momentum and playing "in the moment": if I work at playing one point at a time and having a short memory, how would I harness momentum? Doesn't that require integrating the past?

I suppose what I do is to keep track of what's working and what's not working and to try and do more of the former and less of the latter. But if I'm truly "in the moment", a concept like momentum, which relies on the past, seems contradictory.

What am I viewing incorrectly?
You play the individual points in the moment, but you analyze in between points and determine your strategy and that's when you consider momentum among other factors.

J
 
#3
I have no clue but I know that when I really play my best tennis its when I don't question miself or have low confidence or overthink about thinks, its when my mind is empty

Something just starts clicking and im really focused on the ball, im not thinking about anything my mind is clear, I just see the ball and play the ball and strike it and try to outplay the opponent and win the point and im completely ZONED in and everything around me doesn't even exist.. then I win or lose the point and I snap out of that trans... then as the next point starts I go into that trans again and im completely ZONED in on the ball again.
 
#4
You play the individual points in the moment, but you analyze in between points and determine your strategy and that's when you consider momentum among other factors.

J
This is exactly what I was thinking but I didn't find the word, playing the point IN THE MOMENT, everything else around me stops, and my mind is focused only on the ball, then when the point is over I snap out of it and then I actually start thinking about stuff, maybe what kind of serve im going to hit next or so.. then as the point starts I get into that zone and MOMENT again and im focused only on the ball and playing the point.

Maybe one day I might manage to play most of the time in a match like this :-D
 
#7
It just occurred to me that there is a contradiction between using/countering momentum and playing "in the moment": if I work at playing one point at a time and having a short memory, how would I harness momentum? Doesn't that require integrating the past?

I suppose what I do is to keep track of what's working and what's not working and to try and do more of the former and less of the latter. But if I'm truly "in the moment", a concept like momentum, which relies on the past, seems contradictory.

What am I viewing incorrectly?
So ... no reason for me to play mind games on you on changeovers ... like "yeah, I struggle on that shot also ... keep at it, you might get it". I should just let your voices in your head do their thing.
 
#10
It just occurred to me that there is a contradiction between using/countering momentum and playing "in the moment": if I work at playing one point at a time and having a short memory, how would I harness momentum? Doesn't that require integrating the past?

I suppose what I do is to keep track of what's working and what's not working and to try and do more of the former and less of the latter. But if I'm truly "in the moment", a concept like momentum, which relies on the past, seems contradictory.

What am I viewing incorrectly?
I like to look at the idea of playing "in the moment" as the mental ritual of planning what to do for only this next point coming up. I think that this can keep any player sharper for more of a match regardless of the overall score.

Sustaining momentum is about recognizing that the plan is working. If you're winning, don't change anything much with the plan, 'cause right now it ain't broken. Maybe momentum and playing "in the moment" sort of go hand in hand.

If I'm losing and my opponent has the momentum, that also affects what I'll do in the moment. Time to embrace the wisdom that says "win fast, lose slow". If my best attack has cost me too many points, it's time to make my opponent earn points without me donating them. If I hit a lot of high-percentage shots, land lots of first serves, and the other guy is still beating me, that's fine. Much easier to live with losing to the other guys than losing to myself.
 
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