More and more college teams include Futures and Challengers on their season schedules

bluetrain4

G.O.A.T.
Not that it matters at all; just noting something that I never really saw until recently. They're not NCAA or ITA affiliated tournaments, but I guess if the plan is for the players to participate, why not include it on the schedule? The University of Illinois, for example, lists 13 Futures and Challengers on their schedule. I assume they have at least a couple of players going to each.
 

andfor

Legend
Many D1 programs schedule ITF's in the fall. Most schools you'll see listing the events on their schedule are typically ranked. Programs that offer this provide the option for their players that want the pro experience or even have desires of trying to make it on the tour. I know a coach that offers his players a two track option. 1. Standard student athlete track, play the tennis schedule no pro events. 2. Professional tennis tract allowing for the player to go to the ITF events in the fall. This phenomenon has been going on for some time now. I don't follow the tennis programs fall schedules as widely as I used to, so recent programs adding ITF to their schedules is unknown to me.

Side note: I do know that its not uncommon for a coach when recruiting a very top level junior to negotiate how many pro events they will play versus varsity events. When we see players in ITF's in the spring possibly up against or conflicting with a dual match, it was not a scheduling mistake. Chances are that had been agreed to possibly even before the spring schedule was released.
 
Last edited:

jcgatennismom

Professional
Not that it matters at all; just noting something that I never really saw until recently. They're not NCAA or ITA affiliated tournaments, but I guess if the plan is for the players to participate, why not include it on the schedule? The University of Illinois, for example, lists 13 Futures and Challengers on their schedule. I assume they have at least a couple of players going to each.
The schools may list multiple Challengers as they dont know which their players will get in. Now players with ATP points will definitely get in and probably those with ITF world points. However talented players who have not earned a point yet (or who had points that have expired) may end up at the bottom of alternate lists. The alternate list is randomly generated so an unranked UTR 13+ collegian could be 50 spots below a UTR 8 USTA 4.5. Players dont pay at registration and can sign up for 6 tournaments the same week. The alternate list can be 200+ names and even after the withdrawal deadline, the summer Quali alternate lists were 80+ and the recent fall lists have had 45-50+ alternate 4 days before Qualis start. Last fall, some ITFs had Qualis of 128-this fall Qualis are 48 draws-up from 24 in spring and 32 in summer.

The sad fact is there are a lot of late withdrawals, alternates wont drive for an uncertain spot, and then some tourneys have 5 byes at the Qualis. If not enough registered alternates sign in, the TD can accept unregistered locals who sign in. There is one 39 year old lawyer UTR 8 who beat a UTR 6 at a Future last fall (obviously the better alternates did not show up to sign in). Now that UTR 8 with 1 ITF world point (he played 32 draw Quali so winning 1 match got him in final rd of Qualis) gets in Future Qualis before unranked uTR 13 college players. Since his lucky draw, he has played 6 more Future Qualis, losing in the 1st rd every time, never winning more than 2 games while players like Lukas Greif (UTR 13.36) end up at the bottom of the alternate list unless they get WCs. Go figure... At least the ITF is coming up with a WTN number (its answer to UTR) so in a couple years those alternates will be ordered by level. Think the WTN is supposed to include college results-not sure if all or just the major ITA tourneys.

While there can be some lopsided matches in the Qualis, even most of the Quali matches are good as usually the Quali seeds have ATP points. Players earn one ITF world point if they reach the final rd of Qualis-in a 48 draw, that means nonseeds who win 2 matches earn a point and hopefully wont be at the bottom of alternates anymore.

Just looked at 1st round at Houston-40 alternates at freeze on Thursday, 2 byes in 1st rd. Greif did get WC (he was #38 alt) and won his 1st rd Quali. 4 byes at Fayetteville AR but there were 55 alternates at freeze on Thurs. Freeze is last day lists are updated online.
 
Last edited:

Johnatan

New User
I think that it is a great way for college players to flirt with the professional tournaments and to get a taste of what is waiting for them on the other side of college if they want to go pro.
I would like to note that only a few schools actually include ITF tournaments like Futures in their Fall season. And when they do, only the top players can participate.
 

jcgatennismom

Professional
is your son currently playing college tennis or did he finish college already
Son is currently playing college tennis. However trying to play Future Qualis is a great idea for juniors, current college players, recent grads, young pros, etc. I say "trying" because sometimes players are alternates at the freeze date, and they have to gamble that they will get in and travel to sign in without a guarantee of entry. It is only $40 or $50 for entry, and if a bunch of guys travel together and split a hotel, it is fairly cheap. There are even some fall tourneys after fall invitational season ends for college players to play on their own. Dont assume colleges are paying for every college player who plays a fall pro tourney. There used to be 3 early Sept tourneys in Canada; they were cancelled in 2019-hopefully they will return in 2020. US pro tourneys are hard-maybe not as hard as European ones. Rich recent college grads can travel around the world and find easier ones. I think Cancun had 12 weeks of pro Futures this year; one guy we know had two Quali rounds vs guys with sub 10 UTRs before losing to a 12.5 in final rd of Qualis. In US Qualis, often players have to beat two 13+ just in Qualis to get in main draw. There are guys close to UTR 14s playing US Future Qualis-usually they are seeded. Players may get an easy draw in 1st rd of 48 draw, but for the Oracle 32 rd Quali US futures, most players are top juniors or collegians from top schools. Win or lose tho it is great prep for juniors before their freshmen fall season. Some of them need a dose of humble pie. Top 5, top 10 blue chip juniors lose to collegians who were just former 4 stars-amazing what a couple of years of college experience will do. Even juniors with some wins at jr grand slams may struggle to get through Future Qualis. It is interesting to see that guys lose in Qualis of summer Futures but if they keep pressing on, they end up winning a fall Future or a round in a Challenger they get in with a WC.

@Johnatan It is not just the tennis college stars that take off fall to play Futures. There is a bench player for a Power 5 school that must have taken off the fall to play. Guy didnt play any single dual matches spring 2019 and was 1-3 playing dubs at duals. Now this fall the player has played a bunch of Futures mostly outside the US but some inside and qualified for 4 main draws and actually earned an ATP point in a US future. He beat a UTR 13+ and lost in 3 sets vs a UTR 13.5+. This guy's UTR has jumped .75 from playing Futures. The guys has a 27-10 record from mid Sept through Dec playing men's prize $, wild card tourneys, Future Qualis, and Future main draws. Maybe with all his fall activity, he has earned a shot at line 6 on his team. He probably would have never gotten there without taking the fall off to gain experience and improve his ranking. With his spring 2019 ranking, he would have been #11 on team, but now as far as UTR ranking for his team, he is the 6th best player, and he has 4th highest ATP/ITF world ranking. Gutsy move-hope it works out for him. Way to show his coaches he is ready to play duals.
 
Last edited:

jcgatennismom

Professional
yo when a NCAA player plays futures he can not collect prize money right?
NCAA player in tennis can accept prize $ up to expenses: NCAA 2018/19 rules 12.12.4.2.2 In tennis, after initial full-time collegiate enrollment, an individual may accept prize money based on his or her place finish or performance in an athletics event. Such prize money may not exceed actual and necessary expenses and may be provided only by the sponsor of the event. Te calculation of actual and necessary expenses shall not include the expenses or fees of anyone other than the individual (e.g., coach’s fees or expenses, family member’s expenses). (Adopted: 1/19/13 efective 8/1/13, Revised: 4/25/18)

Here are items that count as expenses to offset prize $:
12.02.2 Actual and Necessary Expenses. Actual and necessary expenses are limited to: (Adopted: 1/19/13 efective 8/1/13) (a) Meals; (b) Lodging; (c) Apparel, equipment and supplies; (d) Coaching and instruction; (e) Health/medical insurance; (f) Transportation (expenses to and from practice and competition, cost of transportation from home to training/practice site at the beginning of the season/preparation for an event and from training/practice/event site to home at the end of season/event); (g) Medical treatment and physical therapy; (h) Facility usage; (i) Entry fees; and (j) Other reasonable expenses.

Most players would net a year's wins vs annual expenses to result in a net loss. Futures dont pay much. Even if a player won in finals one week, that win would not offset expenses for multiple other tourneys where player did not go deep. Even if the college paid for a player's expenses at fall futures, per the below rules, player could offset prize $ with costs of summer training and transportation to that training, insurance, physical therapy, etc

Have heard stories of college players who received WCs into 250s with a guaranteed payout of several thousand-one traveled internationally for several weeks to train the prior month, another stocked up on racquets, clothes ,etc-they were able to find ways to legitimately spend the $ they would receive. Winners of $25K Future earn $3600 but that has to cover their transportation to tourney, 6+ days of hotel and food, coaching, etc. Now some locals will host Future players, and that give players a chance to break even.

Now college players that earn a WC to a Grand Slam have to turn the $ down or go pro since it is tens of thousands of $. However, those are rare cases like Jenson Brooksby before starting his freshmen year at Baylor. However Jenson enrolled in Jan and didnt play a single college dual match due to injury and the short 2020 season. He turned down around $100K in prize $ just for US Open.
 

bobleenov1963

Hall of Fame
NCAA player in tennis can accept prize $ up to expenses: NCAA 2018/19 rules 12.12.4.2.2 In tennis, after initial full-time collegiate enrollment, an individual may accept prize money based on his or her place finish or performance in an athletics event. Such prize money may not exceed actual and necessary expenses and may be provided only by the sponsor of the event. Te calculation of actual and necessary expenses shall not include the expenses or fees of anyone other than the individual (e.g., coach’s fees or expenses, family member’s expenses). (Adopted: 1/19/13 efective 8/1/13, Revised: 4/25/18)

Here are items that count as expenses to offset prize $:
12.02.2 Actual and Necessary Expenses. Actual and necessary expenses are limited to: (Adopted: 1/19/13 efective 8/1/13) (a) Meals; (b) Lodging; (c) Apparel, equipment and supplies; (d) Coaching and instruction; (e) Health/medical insurance; (f) Transportation (expenses to and from practice and competition, cost of transportation from home to training/practice site at the beginning of the season/preparation for an event and from training/practice/event site to home at the end of season/event); (g) Medical treatment and physical therapy; (h) Facility usage; (i) Entry fees; and (j) Other reasonable expenses.

Most players would net a year's wins vs annual expenses to result in a net loss. Futures dont pay much. Even if a player won in finals one week, that win would not offset expenses for multiple other tourneys where player did not go deep. Even if the college paid for a player's expenses at fall futures, per the below rules, player could offset prize $ with costs of summer training and transportation to that training, insurance, physical therapy, etc

Have heard stories of college players who received WCs into 250s with a guaranteed payout of several thousand-one traveled internationally for several weeks to train the prior month, another stocked up on racquets, clothes ,etc-they were able to find ways to legitimately spend the $ they would receive. Winners of $25K Future earn $3600 but that has to cover their transportation to tourney, 6+ days of hotel and food, coaching, etc. Now some locals will host Future players, and that give players a chance to break even.

Now college players that earn a WC to a Grand Slam have to turn the $ down or go pro since it is tens of thousands of $. However, those are rare cases like Jenson Brooksby before starting his freshmen year at Baylor. However Jenson enrolled in Jan and didnt play a single college dual match due to injury and the short 2020 season. He turned down around $100K in prize $ just for US Open.
@jcgatennismom: I am trying to understand what you said. For example, let say Sam Riffice won the NCAA
men tennis in 2019 and got a WC entry into the US Open where he lost to Federer and Sam collected $58K
prize money (46K after tax). Let also assume that he was a junior at UVA at the time he won the NCAA
men tennis single. The NCAA tournament ended in late May 2019 and the US Open didn't start until the
last week of August 2019.

Since Riffice already knew that he would get the WC entry into the US Open by virtue of winning the NCAA
men single, he could do the following between Jun and August 2019:

- spend 10K on physical training with a physical trainer,
- spend 20K on tennis training at IMG,
- spend 10K on tennis racquets and strings,
- spend 6K on travel, meal and expense for competing at the US Open,

According to the NCAA rules that you posted in your thread, how does a college player violate the NCAA rule by
accepting the prize money at Grand Slam event since he already invested 46K in preparing for the US Open?
 

jcgatennismom

Professional
@bobleenov1963
Maybe the college players does not want to risk losing scholarship and declines $. There is a 30+ pg chapter on amateurism in NCAA rulebook. The rules I listed are the most common rules applied at least at the Future/Challenger level. Athletes probably have to fill out report with compliance dept at uni which may be sent to NCAA and ITA. Maybe coaches tell athletes the limits they can accept. Suppose a player won a lot of $ in the fall of 20xx, the next spring played dual matches, NCAA investigated expense vs prize $, declared player was not an amateur, and the dual matches wins by his team are disqualified. I think NCAA probably looks at prize $>10K more closely. Juniors can accept $10K and then after that only for expenses. If you earn a lot of prize $, the NCAA may be looking at expenses vs $ earned for a particular event rather than a calendar year of Futures and Challengers. There are guys who could have played D1 but handled the pro/amateur issues incorrectly or just made wrong decisions at 17 or 18 and ended up having to play NAIA.
http://www.ncaapublications.com/productdownloads/D120.pdf 2019/20 handbook is 450+ pages-section 12 is amateurism.

You seem to have a lot of spare time on your hands-challenging many posts-maybe you have time to read all 450 pages....
 

bobleenov1963

Hall of Fame
@bobleenov1963
Maybe the college players does not want to risk losing scholarship and declines $. There is a 30+ pg chapter on amateurism in NCAA rulebook. The rules I listed are the most common rules applied at least at the Future/Challenger level. Athletes probably have to fill out report with compliance dept at uni which may be sent to NCAA and ITA. Maybe coaches tell athletes the limits they can accept. Suppose a player won a lot of $ in the fall of 20xx, the next spring played dual matches, NCAA investigated expense vs prize $, declared player was not an amateur, and the dual matches wins by his team are disqualified. I think NCAA probably looks at prize $>10K more closely. Juniors can accept $10K and then after that only for expenses. If you earn a lot of prize $, the NCAA may be looking at expenses vs $ earned for a particular event rather than a calendar year of Futures and Challengers. There are guys who could have played D1 but handled the pro/amateur issues incorrectly or just made wrong decisions at 17 or 18 and ended up having to play NAIA.
http://www.ncaapublications.com/productdownloads/D120.pdf 2019/20 handbook is 450+ pages-section 12 is amateurism.

You seem to have a lot of spare time on your hands-challenging many posts-maybe you have time to read all 450 pages....
Where do you see this in the handbook about "If you earn a lot of prize $, the NCAA may be looking at expenses vs $ earned for a particular event rather than a calendar year of Futures and Challengers."? I have a hard time finding it in the handbook.

LOL... I work in technology and I don't know anything about the NCAA legal mumbo jumbo. Fortunately, I work for a financial lobbying firm in K street where there are so many lawyers that I actually lost count. These athletes need to have better counsel representation.

12.02.2 Actual and Necessary Expenses. Actual and necessary expenses are limited to: (Adopted: 1/19/13 effective 8/1/13)(a) Meals; (b) Lodging; (c) Apparel, equipment and supplies; (d) Coaching and instruction; (e) Health/medical insurance; (f ) Transportation (expenses to and from practice and competition, cost of transportation from home to train-ing/practice site at the beginning of the season/preparation for an event and from training/practice/event site to home at the end of season/event); (g) Medical treatment and physical therapy; (h) Facility usage; (i) Entry fees; and (j) Other reasonable expenses. 2019-20 D

12.02.2.1 ApplicationUnless otherwise permitted by the NCAA constitution or bylaws, actual and neces-sary expenses may be provided only if such expenses are for competition on a team or in a specific event or for practice that is directly related to such competition. The value of such expenses must be commensurate with the fair market value of similar goods and services in the locality in which the expenses are provided and must not be excessive in nature. Actual and necessary expenses shall not include the expenses or fees of anyone other than the individual who participates as a member of the team or in a specific event. (Adopted: 1/19/13 effective 8/1/13)

12.02.3 Calculation of Actual and Necessary Expenses—Individual Sports and Women’s Beach Volleyball. In individual sports and women’s beach volleyball, the calculation of an individual’s actual and necessary expenses shall be based on expenses incurred during each calendar year (January-December), rather than on an event-by-event basis. (Adopted: 1/19/13 effective 8/1/13, Revised: 1/23/19 may be applied retroactively to expenses incurred on or after January 1, 2019
 

andfor

Legend
@jcgatennismom: I am trying to understand what you said. For example, let say Sam Riffice won the NCAA
men tennis in 2019 and got a WC entry into the US Open where he lost to Federer and Sam collected $58K
prize money (46K after tax). Let also assume that he was a junior at UVA at the time he won the NCAA
men tennis single. The NCAA tournament ended in late May 2019 and the US Open didn't start until the
last week of August 2019.

Since Riffice already knew that he would get the WC entry into the US Open by virtue of winning the NCAA
men single, he could do the following between Jun and August 2019:

- spend 10K on physical training with a physical trainer,
- spend 20K on tennis training at IMG,
- spend 10K on tennis racquets and strings,
- spend 6K on travel, meal and expense for competing at the US Open,

According to the NCAA rules that you posted in your thread, how does a college player violate the NCAA rule by
accepting the prize money at Grand Slam event since he already invested 46K in preparing for the US Open?
Expenses are considered during the time of the event. Not 2, 3, 4 weeks or whatever hypothetical time frame preceding the event.
 

bobleenov1963

Hall of Fame
Expenses are considered during the time of the event. Not 2, 3, 4 weeks or whatever hypothetical time frame preceding the event.
I am confused. The NCAA guide book section 12.02.3 stated: Calculation of Actual and Necessary Expenses—Individual Sports and Women’s Beach Volleyball. In individual sports and women’s beach volleyball, the calculation of an individual’s actual and necessary expenses shall be based on expenses incurred during each calendar year (January-December), rather than on an event-by-event basis. (Adopted: 1/19/13 effective 8/1/13, Revised: 1/23/19 may be applied retroactively to expenses incurred on or after January 1, 2019

Isn't that during each calendar year and not event by event basis?
 

andfor

Legend
I am confused. The NCAA guide book section 12.02.3 stated: Calculation of Actual and Necessary Expenses—Individual Sports and Women’s Beach Volleyball. In individual sports and women’s beach volleyball, the calculation of an individual’s actual and necessary expenses shall be based on expenses incurred during each calendar year (January-December), rather than on an event-by-event basis. (Adopted: 1/19/13 effective 8/1/13, Revised: 1/23/19 may be applied retroactively to expenses incurred on or after January 1, 2019

Isn't that during each calendar year and not event by event basis?
I'm not going to get into the weeds with Athletic Department compliance and NCAA rules interpretations. I do believe it's pretty safe to say that reimbursable expenses have to be directly related to traveling to and from a specific event and expenses incurred during the time frame the event in question was officially held.
 

bobleenov1963

Hall of Fame
I'm not going to get into the weeds with Athletic Department compliance and NCAA rules interpretations. I do believe it's pretty safe to say that reimbursable expenses have to be directly related to traveling to and from a specific event and expenses incurred during the time frame the event in question was officially held.
It is exactly what it is, "you believe". If that is the case, rule 12.02.3 would not exist. Neither you nor I nor anyone can say with certainty without consulting an attorney with expertise specifically in this area. One attorney/lobbyist at my work place once said: there are rules and there are ways to get around rules, you just have to recognize it and do it "legally".
 

andfor

Legend
It is exactly what it is, "you believe". If that is the case, rule 12.02.3 would not exist. Neither you nor I nor anyone can say with certainty without consulting an attorney with expertise specifically in this area. One attorney/lobbyist at my work place once said: there are rules and there are ways to get around rules, you just have to recognize it and do it "legally".
You and I both know that liberally interpreting the rules to suit yourself is what you are doing. Expenses before or preparing for an event, come on!

Under your scenario here's what you'd get.

- spend 10K on physical training with a physical trainer, (PT happens to be father)
- spend 20K on tennis training at IMG, (already lives full time at IMG)
- spend 10K on tennis racquets and strings, (buys over surplus for future use needs)
- spend 6K on travel, meal and expense for competing at the US Open, (likely legitimate expenses here as need was based during event timeframe)

Maybe I'm incorrect. Apologies if so. It would be good to have a coach or parent who has dealt with this add on to the convo. https://www.itatennis.co/ita-archiv...nis Player Expense Report Form-2017-06-23.pdf
 

bobleenov1963

Hall of Fame
You and I both know that liberally interpreting the rules to suit yourself is what you are doing. Expenses before or preparing for an event, come on!

Under your scenario here's what you'd get.

- spend 10K on physical training with a physical trainer, (PT happens to be father)
- spend 20K on tennis training at IMG, (already lives full time at IMG)
- spend 10K on tennis racquets and strings, (buys over surplus for future use needs)
- spend 6K on travel, meal and expense for competing at the US Open, (likely legitimate expenses here as need was based during event timeframe)

Maybe I'm incorrect. Apologies if so. It would be good to have a coach or parent who has dealt with this add on to the convo. https://www.itatennis.co/ita-archives/Assets/NCAA Annual College Tennis Player Expense Report Form-2017-06-23.pdf
I have no idea if I am right or wrong about this. I am interpreting rule 12.02.3 as I see it. That's why legal counsel is required for situation like this instead of making a blanket statement. Many times, coaches and parents don't know the specific details of a particular situation. coaches and parents' advice is not the same as "legal counsel" advice.


- spend 10K on physical training with a physical trainer, (PT happens to be father) --- I think there might be rule against against family members or relatives. Now if the PT is a friend of the family, that's different and acceptable I guess. Where I work, there are rules against hiring family members who will report directly to me but it is perfectly ok to hire your neighbor who will report directly to me. That's another way to work around the rule.

- spend 20K on tennis training at IMG, (already lives full time at IMG)- Yes, but if you want to have ATP coaches like Kamal Murray to coach you for a week at the cost of 20K.

- spend 10K on tennis racquets and strings, (buys over surplus for future use needs) - why not? tennis clothing, racquets and strings are expensive. NG cost aruond $55/set. At that level, I am sure they break string at least five times a day, especially with 18g Natural Gut. Lacoste clothing also costs a fortune.

Get legal counsel advice and i am sure one can get around the NCAA rule "legally".
 

andfor

Legend
Looks as if the reimbursement cap is $10K max per year. Rules responsibility compliance is the responsibility of the athlete, coach and Athletic Dept. Compliance team. Break the rules and the NCAA will make a ruling. The NCAA is pretty much made up of attorneys. Ask James Wiseman UofM basketball player how well getting an attorney worked out for him this last season. An individual fighting the NCAA on their own with their own attorney is pretty much a losing battle. The NCAA has too much legal resources ready and waiting for individual lawsuits.
 

bobleenov1963

Hall of Fame
Looks as if the reimbursement cap is $10K max per year.
Link?

Rules responsibility compliance is the responsibility of the athlete, coach and Athletic Dept. Compliance team. Break the rules and the NCAA will make a ruling. The NCAA is pretty much made up of attorneys. Ask James Wiseman UofM basketball player how well getting an attorney worked out for him this last season. An individual fighting the NCAA on their own with their own attorney is pretty much a losing battle. The NCAA has too much legal resources ready and waiting for individual lawsuits.
Did you actually read the whole story instead of bit and piece of it? Here are the fact:

-----
The NCAA punished Wiseman because his family accepted $11,500 in moving expenses in 2017 from Penny Hardaway -- who was then the coach of Memphis East High School. While Hardaway didn't accept a job at the University of Memphis and recruit Wiseman to campus until 2018, the NCAA deemed Hardaway a university booster at the time of the financial support. Hardaway had donated $1 million in 2008 to the university, where he had starred in the 1990s.

Despite the NCAA warning Memphis that it could face penalties that included forfeitures by playing an ineligible player after Wiseman had been eligible for the opening game, Wiseman and his attorneys won a temporary restraining order, which led to him playing two more games to start the Tigers' season.
-----

Hardaway played for Memphis and gave money to the school. That makes him a booster. He gave $11.5K to Wiseman's family which is a big red flag there. Hardaway then accepted a basketball head coaching job at U. Memphis. Big conflict of interest there. Even with all those, Wiseman won a temporary restraining order against the NCAA. What it means is that his case a better than 50.01% of winning in the Federal court.
 

andfor

Legend
Link?



Did you actually read the whole story instead of bit and piece of it? Here are the fact:

-----
The NCAA punished Wiseman because his family accepted $11,500 in moving expenses in 2017 from Penny Hardaway -- who was then the coach of Memphis East High School. While Hardaway didn't accept a job at the University of Memphis and recruit Wiseman to campus until 2018, the NCAA deemed Hardaway a university booster at the time of the financial support. Hardaway had donated $1 million in 2008 to the university, where he had starred in the 1990s.

Despite the NCAA warning Memphis that it could face penalties that included forfeitures by playing an ineligible player after Wiseman had been eligible for the opening game, Wiseman and his attorneys won a temporary restraining order, which led to him playing two more games to start the Tigers' season.
-----

Hardaway played for Memphis and gave money to the school. That makes him a booster. He gave $11.5K to Wiseman's family which is a big red flag there. Hardaway then accepted a basketball head coaching job at U. Memphis. Big conflict of interest there. Even with all those, Wiseman won a temporary restraining order against the NCAA. What it means is that his case a better than 50.01% of winning in the Federal court.
He was initially cleared by the NCAA who knew of the gift, the infraction then mysteriously came up mid-season. Likely pressed by an anonymous tipster. Insert coach from another school and conspiracy theory. 50/50 chance is not good given the downside for the school. Plus he had to repay the gift, with no means to do so and all things considered bailed on fighting it even with the best attorneys. Regardless, your attorney claim falls short.

I already provided this. https://www.itatennis.co/ita-archives/Assets/NCAA Annual College Tennis Player Expense Report Form-2017-06-23.pdf
 
As a College Tennis Coach in the NAIA, I think this is a great idea. It gives players the chance to play very high level tennis and against a level that is beyond many college matches. The guys on tour are TOUGH!! They have been hardened through wins/losses, travel and lonliness. It's a hard road and they aren't afrain of anything. There's no better way to challenge your current level of tennis in college than to go and play a Futures, Challenger, or qualies for both!
 

andfor

Legend
As a College Tennis Coach in the NAIA, I think this is a great idea. It gives players the chance to play very high level tennis and against a level that is beyond many college matches. The guys on tour are TOUGH!! They have been hardened through wins/losses, travel and lonliness. It's a hard road and they aren't afrain of anything. There's no better way to challenge your current level of tennis in college than to go and play a Futures, Challenger, or qualies for both!
Are NAIA players allowed to play ITF or pro events in season? As an amateur of course. If yes, has this always been the case or recently changed in the last 2-3 years?
 

jcgatennismom

Professional
As a College Tennis Coach in the NAIA, I think this is a great idea. It gives players the chance to play very high level tennis and against a level that is beyond many college matches. The guys on tour are TOUGH!! They have been hardened through wins/losses, travel and lonliness. It's a hard road and they aren't afrain of anything. There's no better way to challenge your current level of tennis in college than to go and play a Futures, Challenger, or qualies for both!
Too bad there is only one fall Futures in US in Fayetteville AK in Nov and two challengers in Cary NC and Orlando in Nov. Unbelievable the level of players for the $15K in Ark. The players who stayed back in Europe for fall had a lot more Future and Challenger opportunities with play starting back in August.

At least you in the NAIA had the ITA Cup and the most participation in the fall out of all the college divisions. For D1, it's mainly just SEC and Big 12 playing matches that count and everyone else playing unattached at Fall Circuits. At least there have been some good prize $ tourneys. There is one in Atlanta next weekend with a $4K prize to the winner that has attracted half the OSU team plus players from teams at Georgia, Georgia TEch, and Florida. I live 20 minutes away-would like to watch but they probably wont allow spectators...
 
Are NAIA players allowed to play ITF or pro events in season? As an amateur of course. If yes, has this always been the case or recently changed in the last 2-3 years?
Thats a great question. I dont know the exact ruling on this (especially since we didn't include Futures in our Fall season) but I would assume that they sign in as an amateur and get to compete. Not sure how long its been in effect or if it was a recent development. I think the main issue was prize money acceptance but even that has changed a lot in the last decade.
 

andfor

Legend
Thats a great question. I dont know the exact ruling on this (especially since we didn't include Futures in our Fall season) but I would assume that they sign in as an amateur and get to compete. Not sure how long its been in effect or if it was a recent development. I think the main issue was prize money acceptance but even that has changed a lot in the last decade.
I was told by an NAIA could a few years ago their players couldn't play Futures in season. Then last year noticed some NAIA players in a Futures draw. Maybe the coach was wrong, maybe the players breaking rules, don't know.
 
I was told by an NAIA could a few years ago their players couldn't play Futures in season. Then last year noticed some NAIA players in a Futures draw. Maybe the coach was wrong, maybe the players breaking rules, don't know.
Yes, not sure to be honest but I don't see the reasoning why playing Futures or Futures qualies would violate any rules. A tournament is a tournament... unless there is a specific reason why that I am not aware of.
 
Top