Most oppressive weather conditions you've ever played in?

Shaolin

G.O.A.T.
I've played in some brutal heat but tonight might take the cake. About 90°F with 85% humidity, heat index 105...zero wind. Felt like I was in some kind of prehistoric swamp.

I don't even sweat much and I was soaked a few games in like I jumped in a pool. My opponent was the worst possible guy to play in this, strong 5.0, top 50 in his country where it is normally really hot. Never missed a ball unless you hit a clean winner. 2.5hours of pure torture. Yet for some reason I still loved it.

Just wondering if anyone has worse conditions they've played in they can share.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Our 40+ mixed "season" is all compacted into a single weekend Friday-Sunday. 2 matches Friday, 4 Saturday, 4 Sunday. Last year temps were 110-113 that weekend. Essentially no humidity, but that was the temp in the shade.

Played 1 match Friday evening ... perfectly pleasant
Saturday played 8am, noon, 3pm .... The 3pm match was brutally hot
Sunday played 11am, 2pm and 4pm matches

I kept ice towels in my little cooler and used them on my head and neck on each changeover.

Drank I have no idea how much liquid ... more than 48 oz in each match ... my skin was bone dry.

Monday I was very tired.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Wait ... I will add my other most extreme:

Singles tournament 2016 December 16th. The wind was insane and it was cold (for us). Winds up to 60 mph closed the airport but did not get matches re-scheduled.

Please try serving with steady winds at 50 mph .... exercise in futility.

Light poles swaying back and forth making a terrible squeaking sound .... absolutely ridiculous.
 

WhiteOut

Semi-Pro
several years ago we would go to sanibel island, fl for vacation, last week in june. regularly 90+ and huge humidity. played on hard courts around noon, courts hemmed in by trees, but no shade on the courts themselves. literally like ants under a magnifying glass. fortunately we were just hitting...cant imagine playing a league/tourney match in those conditions. and i loved it.
 

Shaolin

G.O.A.T.
Good ones guys. At least the wind wasn't blowing 50 mph last night for me.

I've played in that kind of wind a few times. It's great with the wind at your back...kick serves come up an extra 2 or 3 feet but serving against it is hell. Impossible to serve big or get depth on groundstrokes. Everything feels like a dropshot o_O
Still enjoy the challenge though.
 

JLyon

Hall of Fame
played in Houston middle of July noon start time, 98 degrees 80% humidity, 2hr match and then had to go right back on an hour later and played a kid from Houston. Was not pretty nor were the after effects of cramping that evening
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
When in TX at Newcombe’s it was like 90 degrees and 60% humidity. Was a little worse in Maui several weeks back when we got there during their ‘hottest days’ the locals kept telling us. You could play about 30 minutes before having to change clothes cuz they were drenched.

In AZ I play when it is pushing 110 degrees on court and it is bad too.
 

PhxRacket

Professional
When in TX at Newcombe’s it was like 90 degrees and 60% humidity. Was a little worse in Maui several weeks back when we got there during their ‘hottest days’ the locals kept telling us. You could play about 30 minutes before having to change clothes cuz they were drenched.

In AZ I play when it is pushing 110 degrees on court and it is bad too.
“Yeah, but it’s a dry heat.”
 

beltsman

Legend
played in Houston middle of July noon start time, 98 degrees 80% humidity, 2hr match and then had to go right back on an hour later and played a kid from Houston. Was not pretty nor were the after effects of cramping that evening
Nah, you probably didn't. That would be a heat index of 148 with a dew point of 91. Two hours in it? You would have heat illness.

I am sure it was hot, very hot. But people overestimate relative humidity greatly. Dew point is a far more accurate measure. Relative humidity drops as temperature goes up. Dew point doesn't.

 
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r2473

G.O.A.T.
When in TX at Newcombe’s it was like 90 degrees and 60% humidity. Was a little worse in Maui several weeks back when we got there during their ‘hottest days’ the locals kept telling us. You could play about 30 minutes before having to change clothes cuz they were drenched.

In AZ I play when it is pushing 110 degrees on court and it is bad too.
I can’t believe you played tennis in Maui in that heat. I was there last year under the same conditions. It was too hot to play at 5am.
 

esgee48

Legend
[/sarcasm] So yo'all classify yourself as young, middle-aged, or old? The terminating suffix 'and stupid' goes without saying. :giggle: 'Civilized beasts' spend time in more suitable environments under those conditions. [/end sarcasm]

TBH for tennis, anything over 85 °F is too much for this old lizard. Same with anything below 50 °F.
 

Cawlin

Semi-Pro
It's a tossup for me between two:

The first was probably mid 80s Freedomheit air temp off the court, with upwards of 75% relative humidity - afternoon dubs match late summer/early fall of last year - temp on court was probably a good 10-15 degrees hotter, heat index of around 125 to 130+. The conditions themselves weren't the worst I'd ever played in, but the length of the match in those conditions made it so... we were all willing to paly a super tiebreaker for the 3rd set except one guy on the other team... "This is my Weekend! Let's play a set!" so without unanimous agreement for a tiebreaker, we had no option but to play the 3rd set. It was a league team match, and we were line 5 of 5 so we were the last ones on the court. All the water and sports drinks were gone, we'd even poured the melted ice from the coolers into our water bottles. People were filling bottles from the bathroom sink faucets for us, my wife ran to the store around the corner for a 12 pack of water... the guy who wanted to play the 3rd set started to really fade, we took the set 6-2 or maybe 6-1, I can't remember, but his partner was PISSED.

I felt the dehydration effects for 3 days after.


Second possibility: This past winter, another dubs match, but it was COLD - just above the "let's call it" temp, so upper 30s, low 40s. It had rained the night before and the air was damp and bonechilling. I was wearing sweatpants with a zippered pocket (never again!) and my offhand was so cold and numb that I didn't realize I'd cut it on the zipper reaching into the pocket for the other ball to make a second serve. I didn't even realize I had cut myself or that I was bleeding until we went to shake hands at the end of the match and the opponents recoiled from my outstretched hand because it had blood all over it...
 
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Shaolin

G.O.A.T.
Nah, you probably didn't. That would be a heat index of 148 with a dew point of 91. Two hours in it? You would have heat illness.

I am sure it was hot, very hot. But people overestimate relative humidity greatly. Dew point is a far more accurate measure. Relative humidity drops as temperature goes up. Dew point doesn't.

According to that chart what I played in last night was approx 118 heat index. That's about what it felt like. Dont know much about dewpoint, will have to learn more about it.
 

brettatk

Semi-Pro
I'd have to say it was at 40+ Sectionals down in Mobile, AL. Court temperature was around 125 degrees. There wasn't an available cot inside the IV trailer. Midway into my second match that day I was toast and lost in a super tie breaker.
 

Idrayer

New User
My worst was middle school tryouts where we had to play matches while it was snowing (hooray for a coach who doesn't understand the concept that wet, icy courts are slippery and could be dangerous).
 

ptuanminh

Hall of Fame
During summer in my hometown, i played outside 5 times a week under 95 deg and above and 85% humidity. After 2 3 games, its really hard to breath.
 

Rattler

Hall of Fame
I remember two

While still on active duty, Incirlik AB, Turkey.

It was 120+ degrees. I was hitting with a very good player, we’d been TDY to the base. Ran into each other at the courts and tried to get as much play together as we could...didn’t always run into good players in the AF. The Security Police chased us off the court after about 20 minutes, threatening to arrest us if we didn’t get off the court.

Corpus Christi, TX in Feb...a tournament in 35 to 50 mile an hour winds...everything you’ve ever heard about playing in Corpus is true, if not understated.
 

PDJ

G.O.A.T.
UK.
The wind.
I once played a league doubles match where the ball would roll from my court to the slightly uphill fourth court.
It was so bad that I had to serve under arm as impossible to throw the ball up.
 

Beto 04

New User
Back in high school I played a tourney match with temps in the low 30s/high 20s. Worst part was I had a first round bye and had to sit outside for 2 hours waiting. Match was super quick 6-0, 6-0 thankfully. The last couple games it was snowing decently but we played on.
 

PMChambers

Hall of Fame
Heat isn't much of an issue but humidity is. I played once where I quite and had to wrap ice towns over my head and shoulders. I couldn't get body temp down even in ac club.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Heat isn't much of an issue but humidity is. I played once where I quite and had to wrap ice towns over my head and shoulders. I couldn't get body temp down even in ac club.
That doesn't sound like a conditions issue .... that sounds like something else perhaps conditioning. Humidity in and of itself should not cause a person's body temp to rise in the absence of excessive temperature.

Granted, I have chosen to live in the desert .... I hate humidity!
 

PMChambers

Hall of Fame
That doesn't sound like a conditions issue .... that sounds like something else perhaps conditioning. Humidity in and of itself should not cause a person's body temp to rise in the absence of excessive temperature.

Granted, I have chosen to live in the desert .... I hate humidity!
Once ambient temperature get around 32c / 90f with 90+ humidity you can't cool through sweating. Regardless of how fit you are there's no way to lower nody temp although lowering surrounding temperature.
Running in those conditions is extremely dangerous and requires an external method of cooling such as ice or cold toels.
Even the pros struggle at AO and it's not very humid nor excessively hot.
I.now live in arid location and don't have issues playing in 45c/113f weather, not fun but all need to do is take fluids in constantly.
We have months where 45 is the common. Court temp obviously exceeds that.
I actually don't like the low humidity to play in, the ball flies and spin only works off court. I can't volley well and these conditions favour net play. Benefit is it doesn't rain so can play all year round.
I saw edberg play in 101% humidity once. Not for long as thunderstorm broke, wasn't hot, night match and they struggled to survive.
Yes, I'm in poor condition.
 

NLBwell

Legend
I've played in 117 degree temps in Eagle Pass, Tx. Worst heat index was in Houston, though. When it's still in the high 90's and very humid I would sweat through everything. I remember it getting up to 104 in Houston when we played, but I liked it because it was less humid than most other days, even though they had heat warnings out.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Once ambient temperature get around 32c / 90f with 90+ humidity you can't cool through sweating. Regardless of how fit you are there's no way to lower nody temp although lowering surrounding temperature.
Running in those conditions is extremely dangerous and requires an external method of cooling such as ice or cold toels.
Even the pros struggle at AO and it's not very humid nor excessively hot.
I.now live in arid location and don't have issues playing in 45c/113f weather, not fun but all need to do is take fluids in constantly.
We have months where 45 is the common. Court temp obviously exceeds that.
I actually don't like the low humidity to play in, the ball flies and spin only works off court. I can't volley well and these conditions favour net play. Benefit is it doesn't rain so can play all year round.
I saw edberg play in 101% humidity once. Not for long as thunderstorm broke, wasn't hot, night match and they struggled to survive.
Yes, I'm in poor condition.
I don't disagree, humidity can make thing incredibly difficult even dangerous.

But you said you were playing indoors in AC with high humidity .... that's all.
 

PMChambers

Hall of Fame
I don't disagree, humidity can make thing incredibly difficult even dangerous.

But you said you were playing indoors in AC with high humidity .... that's all.
No, I went into club house with Ac after playing and couldn't cool fast enough needed cool blood near head with cold towls. The ac would have worked but I needed to lower body temp fast.anyway, it is what it is, I've seen pros wilt. End of the day if you cant cool through sweating with got to stop or drop dead. I play in extreme heat, just need to be prepared.
 

Mark Bosko

New User
I moved to Hilton Head Island, SC in April, the summer is routinely 90+ degrees with 70 - 90% humidity. All the USTA league matches were scheduled in the mid to late afternoon (2-4PM). I won't be doing that again. You sweat a lot but it does not cool you down because your sweat does not evaporate due to the high humidity. Almost no one plays hard courts here, that would add another 10 - 15 degrees to the temperature in the summer. Sucks.
 

Nacho

Hall of Fame
I had to play a USTA Sectionals Singles Match indoors one time because of rain, in August with the heat outside around 95 and 100% humidity....The AC was not on and one of the fans was busted...And we went to 3 sets....It was awful, like playing in a hot yoga studio
 
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