Muzziah Manor – followers of the Mettled Master of Magnanimity

Rejoice!


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Picmun

Hall of Fame
Andy Murray defeated Canada's Vasek Pospisil to move into the quarter-finals of the Moselle Open in France.

The British former world number one, 34, won 6-3 6-3 to set up a tie against either France's Lucas Pouille or top seed Hubert Hurkacz of Poland.
"I've not played this many tournaments in a while and my body feels good," said Murray.




"I'm gaining confidence and seeing the points develop. The results are coming and my tennis is getting better."

On Tuesday, Murray fought back from a set down to defeat world number 26 Ugo Humbert 4-6 6-3 6-2 in the first round.

Murray, ranked 113th in the world, is making only his second appearance in Metz, having reached the final in 2007.

Humbert was the highest-ranked player Murray has beaten this season and he followed that with success against Pospisil, who is 66th in the rankings.

Three-time Grand Slam winner Murray, who has undergone two surgeries on his right hip in the past three years, has now gained victories in 684 tour-level matches.
 

Picmun

Hall of Fame
Nice win, it's just so good to see him play with some of the old magic.
As ever the killer Murray dropper and lob was in evidence - Pure Poetry.
 
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flyingboris

Legend
Twenty minutes until bionic Murray faces the new #10. Anybody going to watch?



Edit: needs more engine oil. Ruud wins 7-5 6-4. Decent fight with some bad decisions and badly timed lapses.
 
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Mainad

Bionic Poster
So far it looks like the Muzzah was taken out by the eventual champion. Ruud serving at 4-0 in the first set v. Norrie.
Norrie suffered a bagel in the 1st set and could only manage 2 games in the 2nd and this is the guy who took out Rublev! At least Andy took 9 games off him and might have won their 1st set if he could have been a bit more clutch on the big points!!
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Mannarino from Heaven for The Metal Muzziah?

The French lefty has won just once since injuring himself at Wimby vs fedr and that required a 0-2 comeback 1R USO vs Herbert. He also got spanked 3&2 by Gianluca Mager in Sofia a week ago.

Bettors must invest large for a meager return: 1.29-3.59 are the numbers.
 

Picmun

Hall of Fame
Andy Murray VS Adrian Mannarino






34 (1987.05.15) Age 33 (1988.06.29)
Great Britain Birthplace France
Surrey, England Residence Valletta, Malta
6'3" (191 cm) Height 5'11" (180 cm)
181 lbs (82 kg) Weight 174 lbs (79 kg)
Right-Handed Plays Left-Handed
Two-Handed Backhand Two-Handed
2005 Turned Pro 2004
9/9 YTD Won/Lost 10/20
0 YTD Titles 0
685/209 CAREER W/L 213/256
46 Career Titles 1
$62,163,108 Career Prize Money $8,428,187
Event Breakdown


Year Event Surface RND Winner Result
2015 US Open
NY, U.S.A.
Outdoor Hard R64 Andy Murray 57 46 61 63 61
2015 ATP Masters 1000 Indian Wells
CA, U.S.A.
Outdoor Hard R16 Andy Murray 63 63
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Royalty of the terre battue lineage wants to know why The Muzziah plays tennis with his wedding ring on his shoelaces. Which magnanimous militia member would be nice enough to give her a clue?

“Gee, gal! The gent just lost his wedding ring to a shoe burglar and you want to mock him for believing the ring must be worn at all times when in a loving union? Have some compassion!”
 

Picmun

Hall of Fame
Andy Murray VS Adrian Mannarino






34 (1987.05.15) Age 33 (1988.06.29)
Great Britain Birthplace France
Surrey, England Residence Valletta, Malta
6'3" (191 cm) Height 5'11" (180 cm)
181 lbs (82 kg) Weight 174 lbs (79 kg)
Right-Handed Plays Left-Handed
Two-Handed Backhand Two-Handed
2005 Turned Pro 2004
9/9 YTD Won/Lost 10/20
0 YTD Titles 0
685/209 CAREER W/L 213/256
46 Career Titles 1
$62,163,108 Career Prize Money $8,428,187
Event Breakdown


Year Event Surface RND Winner Result
2015 US Open
NY, U.S.A.
Outdoor Hard R64 Andy Murray 57 46 61 63 61
2015 ATP Masters 1000 Indian Wells
CA, U.S.A.
Outdoor Hard R16 Andy Murray 63 63
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Next up after pasting Mannarino is the teenager on the mend Alcaraz. It will be the young Spaniard’s first match since retiring at USO with two separate leg issues to address.
 
Has Murray talked about his hip injury and said if some surfaces put less strain on it while others put more?
Has he talked about how the injury affects his schedule?
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Has Murray talked about his hip injury and said if some surfaces put less strain on it while others put more?
Has he talked about how the injury affects his schedule?
The interviews I’ve heard seem to be less specific on your two chosen topics. It’s pretty obvious he’s capable of a good level for only one or two matches per tournament up till now. A HC will never be friendly for wheels issues so he needs longer recovery time between matches on the surface. IW might be perfect because it’s scheduled like a slam with days off but it’s Bo3.

Alcaraz will be a challenge if the teen’s own wheels are healed an FVV he’s able to “de-rust.”
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
I'm a bit terrified of tennis hip injuries. Hewitt, Kuerten and Nalbandian pretty much stopped being top players when they got injured + hip surgery.
Sports medicine has evolved quite a lot since your example cases. I’m thinking of the Bryan brother and his resurfacing recovery that got him back to near 100%. I also think of Mikael Ymer, who has climbed higher in the last few years than he reached before he wrecked a hip, ironically in a match vs older brother Elias. Ymer did not require the resurface because of his youth (still a teen when it happened) and lack of chronic wear and tear. Still, he went under the knife and was back competing within a year.

Yes, it is to be avoided if possible because the hip is used to generate a lot of power on the serve and takes a licking on directional changes during rallies, especially on the HCs. Ironically. the sooner any hip injury happens the better chances there are to get back to peak. Muzziah does not enjoy that softer landing.
 

Sysyphus

Talk Tennis Guru
I met a traveller from a drunken land,
Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of steel
Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal, these words appear:
My name is undy muzziah, King of Kings;
Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

– percy 'muzz' shelley

 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
Our Muzziah got a mention after the snooker match. Neil Robertson recently got married, and he was talking to Jimmy White about wearing a wedding ring. Jimmy took his off when he played. Neil Robertson is wearing his at the minute. Then he said he can't have his stolen like Andy Murray.

Our Muzziah transcends the game of tennis. Praise be.
 

BeatlesFan

Bionic Poster
Article from The Telegraph today:

Andy Murray's one-man moral crusade is far more than just gesture politics


Whether it is the coronavirus pandemic or women's issues, Murray has always found a way of publicly articulating his progressive views

It would be too strong to class Andy Murray and Alexander Zverev's meeting at Indian Wells as a grudge match. But a converging of polar opposite public personas, it most definitely is.

Murray is widely regarded as the archetype male ally and feminist in sport; world No 4 Zverev is accused of domestic violence against his ex-girlfriend, Olga Sharypova. Ahead of the tie, Murray's response to questions about their off-court relationship were revealing in their brevity. “I wouldn't say we're best friends," he said of Zverev. "Yeah, I mean, we don't really chat a whole lot.” It is unsurprising.

While the ATP remained silent on the allegations against Zverev for nearly a year, Murray has become a player spokesperson of sorts on the matter. He repeatedly called out his sport's governing body for its failure to act quickly enough.

In a move welcomed by Murray, last week the ATP finally responded, announcing its formal investigation into the claims. Quite rightly though, he recently questioned why he was one of the only players consistently asked for his view. The answer lies in his well-established, unofficial role as the moral conscience not only of tennis, but sport as a whole.

Whether it is the coronavirus pandemic or women's issues, Murray has always found a way of publicly articulating his progressive views. He has defended and encouraged equal pay (and criticised the likes of Novak Djokovic for his opposition). He has urged tournaments to rethink their scheduling, so women feature as much as men do on the show courts. And who can forget the viral videos of his curt handling of reporters airbrushing women - mainly the Williams sisters - from tennis history?

Murray has said his eyes were opened to sexism in sport in 2014, when he became one of the first major men's players to appoint a female coach, Amelie Mauresmo. He has since written essays about the importance of having more female coaches across sport. On the Zverev story, he stepped up when few others have. First reported by American journalist Ben Rothenberg last November, Sharypova alleges that Zverev punched her in the face when in Shanghai for the 2019 ATP Finals and smothered her with a pillow ahead of the US Open that same year. She claims his controlling behaviour led to her attempting suicide.

Zverev, 24, denied the allegations, and took out an injunction in a German court against the reports. For his part, he has also welcomed the ATP's investigation, and agreed with Murray that the governing body has been too slow. But, with typical self-assurance, also said, "It's very difficult in my situation because a lot of the times the man is not really believed." An interesting take, considering the number of domestic abuse cases reaching the courts has plummeted in recent years, according to UK figures.

While Zverev's comments pertain solely to his personal stake in things, Murray has - consciously or not - built a brand as a man of the people. His diligent care for inclusive language and support for issues that affect women have often disrupted the status quo, and speaking out on the Zverev allegations showed once again he is unafraid to ruffle feathers.

A select few have followed suit. Broadcaster and former player Mary Carillo became the first major name to actively protest the ATP's inaction, pulling out of her presenting role at the Laver Cup last month. Canadian player Milos Raonic also said recently that he was "embarrassed" about the ATP's handling of things.

Other major names have been less inclined to wade in. Roger Federer - whose management agency used to represent Zverev - shrunk away from questions, calling the allegations "private stuff", and calling the German a "great guy".

Djokovic supported the need for a domestic violence policy in tennis, but simultaneously described Zverev as a "very nice guy" who he has "a lot of respect for". Rafael Nadal has said very little. Whether he likes to admit it or not, Murray has forged this image as sport's moral compass.

When slugging out points against Zverev on the court, supporters may find it difficult to separate the contest from the off-court narrative.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/tennis/...-man-moral-crusade-far-just-gesture-politics/
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Article from The Telegraph today:

Andy Murray's one-man moral crusade is far more than just gesture politics


Whether it is the coronavirus pandemic or women's issues, Murray has always found a way of publicly articulating his progressive views

It would be too strong to class Andy Murray and Alexander Zverev's meeting at Indian Wells as a grudge match. But a converging of polar opposite public personas, it most definitely is.

Murray is widely regarded as the archetype male ally and feminist in sport; world No 4 Zverev is accused of domestic violence against his ex-girlfriend, Olga Sharypova. Ahead of the tie, Murray's response to questions about their off-court relationship were revealing in their brevity. “I wouldn't say we're best friends," he said of Zverev. "Yeah, I mean, we don't really chat a whole lot.” It is unsurprising.

While the ATP remained silent on the allegations against Zverev for nearly a year, Murray has become a player spokesperson of sorts on the matter. He repeatedly called out his sport's governing body for its failure to act quickly enough.

In a move welcomed by Murray, last week the ATP finally responded, announcing its formal investigation into the claims. Quite rightly though, he recently questioned why he was one of the only players consistently asked for his view. The answer lies in his well-established, unofficial role as the moral conscience not only of tennis, but sport as a whole.

Whether it is the coronavirus pandemic or women's issues, Murray has always found a way of publicly articulating his progressive views. He has defended and encouraged equal pay (and criticised the likes of Novak Djokovic for his opposition). He has urged tournaments to rethink their scheduling, so women feature as much as men do on the show courts. And who can forget the viral videos of his curt handling of reporters airbrushing women - mainly the Williams sisters - from tennis history?

Murray has said his eyes were opened to sexism in sport in 2014, when he became one of the first major men's players to appoint a female coach, Amelie Mauresmo. He has since written essays about the importance of having more female coaches across sport. On the Zverev story, he stepped up when few others have. First reported by American journalist Ben Rothenberg last November, Sharypova alleges that Zverev punched her in the face when in Shanghai for the 2019 ATP Finals and smothered her with a pillow ahead of the US Open that same year. She claims his controlling behaviour led to her attempting suicide.

Zverev, 24, denied the allegations, and took out an injunction in a German court against the reports. For his part, he has also welcomed the ATP's investigation, and agreed with Murray that the governing body has been too slow. But, with typical self-assurance, also said, "It's very difficult in my situation because a lot of the times the man is not really believed." An interesting take, considering the number of domestic abuse cases reaching the courts has plummeted in recent years, according to UK figures.

While Zverev's comments pertain solely to his personal stake in things, Murray has - consciously or not - built a brand as a man of the people. His diligent care for inclusive language and support for issues that affect women have often disrupted the status quo, and speaking out on the Zverev allegations showed once again he is unafraid to ruffle feathers.

A select few have followed suit. Broadcaster and former player Mary Carillo became the first major name to actively protest the ATP's inaction, pulling out of her presenting role at the Laver Cup last month. Canadian player Milos Raonic also said recently that he was "embarrassed" about the ATP's handling of things.

Other major names have been less inclined to wade in. Roger Federer - whose management agency used to represent Zverev - shrunk away from questions, calling the allegations "private stuff", and calling the German a "great guy".

Djokovic supported the need for a domestic violence policy in tennis, but simultaneously described Zverev as a "very nice guy" who he has "a lot of respect for". Rafael Nadal has said very little. Whether he likes to admit it or not, Murray has forged this image as sport's moral compass.

When slugging out points against Zverev on the court, supporters may find it difficult to separate the contest from the off-court narrative.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/tennis/...-man-moral-crusade-far-just-gesture-politics/
Muzz is who he is thanks to his mother’s role in raising him so he will always stand up for equality. Bravo, Andy!
 

Mainad

Bionic Poster
Muzz is who he is thanks to his mother’s role in raising him so he will always stand up for equality. Bravo, Andy!
Given that he and his brother were largely brought up by their dad we should not ignore his role in the formation of their characters.
 
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