Muzziah Manor – followers of the Mettled Master of Magnanimity

Rejoice!


  • Total voters
    97
  • This poll will close: .

Sysyphus

Talk Tennis Guru
“If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.”
– Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms
Bit maudlin? Yes, but it's a maudlin kind of day, innit.

We hoped against hope, clinging on to every faintest shimmer of light: Every now and then an athlete manages to come back from seemingly insurmountable setbacks, and who else if not the spunky Scot who has been fighting his heart out his entire career for a seat at the table of legends, clawed his way back from back surgery, battled forward after numerous dispiriting defeats on the world stage. But it seems at last that the day has come, when the conspiring of compromised bones and cartilages with wear and tear have reached such a point that even this warrior cannot fight on.

And as much as a part of us knew that this day might come sooner than later, it's nothing less than gut-wrenching all the same.

But while it sucks for his fans – and obviously far more so for the man himself – let's not only wallow in anguish. It's also a time to pay homage to this unique athlete.

In this epoch of three of the most superhuman players to grace this game, Andy by contrast was all too human. Perhaps that's precisely why many of us were so inexplicably drawn to him in the first place. The eternal struggle, existentially plagued grimaces, highlighting more than any other how tennis isn't firstly a game against your opponent, but against yourself. And so perhaps it had to end like this – the mortal who for a while soared among the gods also had to be the first one to have his wings clipped.

But what a journey we were served. First time I really noticed you, Andy, you were an obstinate and somewhat Ostrich-like-looking teen in the process of taking the seasoned Clément to five at Flushing Meadows. Then you began puking on court and got bageled in the decider. So, impossible not to be a fan of you from the very outset, then. Since then you quickly leaped up into the world's elite. But while the pressure of a nation hungry for a champion grew, that final hurdle eluded you. The setbacks were tough, but with them, you became tough as well. How much sweeter, then, when you finally broke through that final ceiling and kept on going: Olympic Gold, US Open Champion, and sweetest of them all, ending 77 years of drought to become a British Wimbledon champion. This couldn't last, of course. The fates had more setbacks in store: a back surgery, some more losses in major finals. But where a lesser athlete might've lost the fighting spirit at this point, you kept pushing forward, leaving every drop of sweat your body could produce out on court in each match and every grueling training block. And the rewards came – carrying your nation to a Cinderella-like Davis Cup title, a second Wimbledon title, something as unlikely as defending an Olympic Gold, and to crown it all: World Number One. Top of the mountain, a mortal ruler of Gods. At last.

In the movies, this is where the story would end. Fade to black as the confetti rains in the O2 arena while Andy makes a dry remark like, «Obviously I'm pretty happy with this result.» But life is often crueler than that. However, following your career has been no less an epic story all the same. Thanks for all the joy, and may you at least get to end this journey somewhat on your own terms.
 
Last edited:

Red Rick

Talk Tennis Guru
“If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.”
– Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms
Bit maudlin? Yes, but it's a maudlin kind of day, innit.

We hoped against hope, clinging on to every faintest shimmer of light: Every now and then an athlete manages to come back from seemingly insurmountable setbacks, and who else if not the spunky Scot who has been fighting his heart out his entire career for a seat at the table of legends, clawed his way back from back surgery, battled forward after numerous dispiriting defeats on the world stage. But it seems at last that the day has come, when the conspiring of compromised bones and cartilages with wear and tear have reached such a point that even this warrior cannot fight on.

And as much as a part of us knew that this day might come sooner than later, it's nothing less than gut-wrenching all the same.

But while it sucks for his fans – and obviously far more so for the man himself – let's not only wallow in anguish. It's also a time to pay homage to this unique athlete.

In this epoch of three of the most superhuman players to grace this game, Andy by contrast was all too human. Perhaps that's precisely why many of us were so inexplicably drawn to him in the first place. The eternal struggle, existentially plagued grimaces, highlighting more than any other how tennis isn't firstly a game against your opponent, but against yourself. And so perhaps it had to end like this – the mortal who for a while soared among the gods also had to be the first one to have his wings clipped.

But what a journey we were served. First time I really noticed you, Andy, you were an obstinate and somewhat Ostrich-like-looking teen in the process of taking the seasoned Clément to five at Flushing Meadows. Then you began puking on court and got bageled in the decider. So, impossible not to be a fan of you from the very outset, then. Since then you quickly leaped up into the world's elite. But while the pressure of a nation hungry for a champion grew, that final hurdle eluded you. The setbacks were tough, but with them, you became tough as well. How much sweeter, then, when you finally broke through that final ceiling and kept on going: Olympic Gold, US Open Champion, and sweetest of them all, ending 77 years of drought to become a British Wimbledon champion. This couldn't last, of course. The fates had more setbacks in store: a back surgery, some more losses in major finals. But where a lesser athlete might've lost the fighting spirit at this point, you kept pushing forward, leaving every drop of sweat your body could produce out on court in each match and every grueling training block. And the rewards came – carrying your nation to a Cinderella-like Davis Cup title, a second Wimbledon title, something as unlikely as defending an Olympic Gold, and to crown it all: World Number One. Top of the mountain, a mortal ruler of Gods. At last.

In the movies, this is where the story would end. Fade to black as the confetti rains in the O2 arena while Andy makes a dry remark like, «Obviously I'm pretty happy with this result.» But life is often crueler than that. However, following your career has been no less an epic story all the same. Thanks for all the joy, and may you at least get to end this journey somewhat on your own terms.
One sleepless night ago I said I had no words. And even if I had found them, I knew someone would know to voice the inner turmoil better than I ever could.
 

Gytha

Legend
Lovely article on Deadspin

And then there’s Murray, with a well-stocked utility belt and a nice brain, entering the fray totally mortal and a little pissy. But to go at the three greatest ever to do it and come away with three majors (including long-awaited homegrown Wimbledon glory), two gold medals, a year-end finals, a raft of masters, months at the world No. 1—there is no euphemism needed for any of that. There’s just the trophy shelf. Andy Murray rose up and did the ****, while hundreds of other triers left empty-handed.


Andy Murray was a real person walking among gods
 

Rebel-I.N.S

Professional
Thinking about some of my favourite Murray wins today.

When he beat Novak in the Montreal final in 2015, it was huge.

After growing accustomed to Djoko turning him over at will, it was a defiant bloody nose to an opponent who’d cast doubt over whether or not there was a “rivalry”.

Djokovic and Murray are 11-8 in finals (in Novak’s favour) - that’s more than respectable against a true GOAT of the sport.
 
Last edited:

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
Not one of the more known Andy Murray songs (but the best known song. Funny how that works) Not even an Andy Murray song, but I consider it one because it was playing on some sky sports montage during the journey to Murray becoming number one. He was making all these winners because he got aces up his sleeve yo. Just imagine. There you go. Nice tune.

 

BeatlesFan

Talk Tennis Guru
“If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.”
– Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms
Bit maudlin? Yes, but it's a maudlin kind of day, innit.

We hoped against hope, clinging on to every faintest shimmer of light: Every now and then an athlete manages to come back from seemingly insurmountable setbacks, and who else if not the spunky Scot who has been fighting his heart out his entire career for a seat at the table of legends, clawed his way back from back surgery, battled forward after numerous dispiriting defeats on the world stage. But it seems at last that the day has come, when the conspiring of compromised bones and cartilages with wear and tear have reached such a point that even this warrior cannot fight on.

And as much as a part of us knew that this day might come sooner than later, it's nothing less than gut-wrenching all the same.

But while it sucks for his fans – and obviously far more so for the man himself – let's not only wallow in anguish. It's also a time to pay homage to this unique athlete.

In this epoch of three of the most superhuman players to grace this game, Andy by contrast was all too human. Perhaps that's precisely why many of us were so inexplicably drawn to him in the first place. The eternal struggle, existentially plagued grimaces, highlighting more than any other how tennis isn't firstly a game against your opponent, but against yourself. And so perhaps it had to end like this – the mortal who for a while soared among the gods also had to be the first one to have his wings clipped.

But what a journey we were served. First time I really noticed you, Andy, you were an obstinate and somewhat Ostrich-like-looking teen in the process of taking the seasoned Clément to five at Flushing Meadows. Then you began puking on court and got bageled in the decider. So, impossible not to be a fan of you from the very outset, then. Since then you quickly leaped up into the world's elite. But while the pressure of a nation hungry for a champion grew, that final hurdle eluded you. The setbacks were tough, but with them, you became tough as well. How much sweeter, then, when you finally broke through that final ceiling and kept on going: Olympic Gold, US Open Champion, and sweetest of them all, ending 77 years of drought to become a British Wimbledon champion. This couldn't last, of course. The fates had more setbacks in store: a back surgery, some more losses in major finals. But where a lesser athlete might've lost the fighting spirit at this point, you kept pushing forward, leaving every drop of sweat your body could produce out on court in each match and every grueling training block. And the rewards came – carrying your nation to a Cinderella-like Davis Cup title, a second Wimbledon title, something as unlikely as defending an Olympic Gold, and to crown it all: World Number One. Top of the mountain, a mortal ruler of Gods. At last.

In the movies, this is where the story would end. Fade to black as the confetti rains in the O2 arena while Andy makes a dry remark like, «Obviously I'm pretty happy with this result.» But life is often crueler than that. However, following your career has been no less an epic story all the same. Thanks for all the joy, and may you at least get to end this journey somewhat on your own terms.
@Sysyphus - brilliant post! More wisdom and erudition in this than the rest of the entire Forum. (y)
 

Zara

Legend
My last link to tennis. There will be no more after Andy. He's given us beautiful memories and supporting him has always been a truly spiritual experience for me. I know there are 3 other big guys but he was always the One for me and will always be.

And the beautiful man he is and was to me.

















Man that made the Brits proud



When words aren't enough.

 

Zara

Legend
And back in those days when Andy had yet to win a Slam, this used to be my song for him. I'd refer Fedal as the 'fat cats'. LOL

Rise up and take the power back, it's time that
The fat cats had a heart attack, you know that
Their time is coming to an end
We have to unify and watch our flag ascend
(So come on!)

They will not force us
They will stop degrading us
They will not control us
We will be Victorious!
(Come on!)

LOL but hey! It's a competitive sport so anything goes, no? Don't feel the same way, of course.

 
Last edited:

Red Rick

Talk Tennis Guru
https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2019/jan/13/andy-murray-tennis-retirement

“Once I’d started thinking about stopping, that there was a possibility that I wasn’t going to be playing much longer, all of the things that I thought I would quite like to do, I have zero interest in doing right now."

“I have no motivation to do anything else just now. Thinking about what I do when I finish playing and rushing into decisions – from speaking to psychologists – is the worst thing I should be doing. It’s going to take time for me to deal with it. I need time to get over it and then to know what my next steps are going to be.

“I know that will be difficult. I love tennis. I love playing the game.”
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
Best tribute I can possibly give at the moment.




@Zara This still has the flash light but the overall image doesn't look so crap. haha It was funny, I was fiddling with the buttons and then I got a 10 second countdown. Think we can tell that I was extra motivated. Ok, no more top spin pictures.



Random thought. Gonna miss the Muzziah fist pump. Always loved how he put it all in when he did it.
 

Red Rick

Talk Tennis Guru
Best tribute I can possibly give at the moment.




@Zara This still has the flash light but the overall image doesn't look so crap. haha It was funny, I was fiddling with the buttons and then I got a 10 second countdown. Think we can tell that I was extra motivated. Ok, no more top spin pictures.



Random thought. Gonna miss the Muzziah fist pump. Always loved how he put it all in when he did it.
40 winners

You didn't push properly
 

Zara

Legend
Best tribute I can possibly give at the moment.




@Zara This still has the flash light but the overall image doesn't look so crap. haha It was funny, I was fiddling with the buttons and then I got a 10 second countdown. Think we can tell that I was extra motivated. Ok, no more top spin pictures.



Random thought. Gonna miss the Muzziah fist pump. Always loved how he put it all in when he did it.
You are using flash at night or the room is dark because your camera is not DSLR agaisnt a screen so it's reflecting back. If DSLR then you could have just increased the ISO to give it enough light without using the flash light. Not that I am suggesting that you should buy one now! but the overall image doens't look as bad I agree.

Look at this one. No flash but you still spot some reflection.

 
Last edited:

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
You are using flash at night or the room is dark because your camera is not DSLR agaisnt a screeen so it's reflecting back. If DSLR then you could have just increased the ISO to give it enough light without using the flash light. Not that I am suggesting that you should buy one now! but the overall image doens't look as bad I agree.

Look at this one. No flash but you still spot some reflection.

Thank you.

Yes, I guess all artists have their own style. I press the button to turn flash off and then you get an image you can hardly see. Was pleased with how that last one turned out. I can't keep blaming the technology. A good workman doesn't blame his tools. I never claimed to be good. :p

A flawless Muzziah image that was not taken by my camera. Surprise.

 

Zara

Legend
I think Andy is playing at 2am tonight my time if it's not supposed to start before 6pm Melbourne time, that is.

I will still be staying away from the forum during the AO. I just made an exception because of Andy but I will be watching him of course - win or loss. Will come back after the AO possibly early February.

I'd also like to post my top 5 moments with Andy too. They are just so precious.

A big hug to Mainad in the meantime ((((((Mainad)))))). I am with him in that regard that Andy has underachieved. Not sure if it was the hip injury or if there's something more to it. I just picked up a strange notion from Andy after 2016 as if he was done with it and didn't want to compete at that level anymore and seemed satisfied off the court, but that's just my feeling of him. I did wonder, however, ever since his presser where he announced his retirement if he were to retire just normally at this stage would he have been subjected to much scrutiny by the British media and fans. Because they do expect a lot from him. Anyway, dunno or I guess we'll never find out.
 

Sartorius

Hall of Fame
“If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.”
– Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms
Bit maudlin? Yes, but it's a maudlin kind of day, innit.

We hoped against hope, clinging on to every faintest shimmer of light: Every now and then an athlete manages to come back from seemingly insurmountable setbacks, and who else if not the spunky Scot who has been fighting his heart out his entire career for a seat at the table of legends, clawed his way back from back surgery, battled forward after numerous dispiriting defeats on the world stage. But it seems at last that the day has come, when the conspiring of compromised bones and cartilages with wear and tear have reached such a point that even this warrior cannot fight on.

And as much as a part of us knew that this day might come sooner than later, it's nothing less than gut-wrenching all the same.

But while it sucks for his fans – and obviously far more so for the man himself – let's not only wallow in anguish. It's also a time to pay homage to this unique athlete.

In this epoch of three of the most superhuman players to grace this game, Andy by contrast was all too human. Perhaps that's precisely why many of us were so inexplicably drawn to him in the first place. The eternal struggle, existentially plagued grimaces, highlighting more than any other how tennis isn't firstly a game against your opponent, but against yourself. And so perhaps it had to end like this – the mortal who for a while soared among the gods also had to be the first one to have his wings clipped.

But what a journey we were served. First time I really noticed you, Andy, you were an obstinate and somewhat Ostrich-like-looking teen in the process of taking the seasoned Clément to five at Flushing Meadows. Then you began puking on court and got bageled in the decider. So, impossible not to be a fan of you from the very outset, then. Since then you quickly leaped up into the world's elite. But while the pressure of a nation hungry for a champion grew, that final hurdle eluded you. The setbacks were tough, but with them, you became tough as well. How much sweeter, then, when you finally broke through that final ceiling and kept on going: Olympic Gold, US Open Champion, and sweetest of them all, ending 77 years of drought to become a British Wimbledon champion. This couldn't last, of course. The fates had more setbacks in store: a back surgery, some more losses in major finals. But where a lesser athlete might've lost the fighting spirit at this point, you kept pushing forward, leaving every drop of sweat your body could produce out on court in each match and every grueling training block. And the rewards came – carrying your nation to a Cinderella-like Davis Cup title, a second Wimbledon title, something as unlikely as defending an Olympic Gold, and to crown it all: World Number One. Top of the mountain, a mortal ruler of Gods. At last.

In the movies, this is where the story would end. Fade to black as the confetti rains in the O2 arena while Andy makes a dry remark like, «Obviously I'm pretty happy with this result.» But life is often crueler than that. However, following your career has been no less an epic story all the same. Thanks for all the joy, and may you at least get to end this journey somewhat on your own terms.
 

Zara

Legend
Would like to send Andy the message of love and high energy with this song. I mean it's not complete until I post one of my Hindi songs - my special trademark!

 

BeatlesFan

Talk Tennis Guru
What stood out to me was how horrible Djoker was playing, hitting endlessly FH's into the net in practice. I wonder if it wasn't because he was deliberately playing at such a gentle level and that threw him off? Because that was anemic from Djokovic. Andy's movement clearly hampered, even for a practice. :cry:
 

Red Rick

Talk Tennis Guru
They say it takes ten thousand hours to truly master a skill. And it is in those ten thousand hours that we come to expect and demand more and more of ourselves, and in cases like Andy, millions of people come to expect more and more. And it is in those chases for titles, rankings and records, that we may fail to keep sight of why it all started, and we may forget to enjoy competing itself. We've hoped for wins, at times against the odds, and yet felt defeated or disappointed when our hopes or expectations weren't met.

Today was perhaps the first time I sat down to watch Andy Murray with a more simple mentality. I was determined to sit down, and just support him no matter what happened. I didn't hope for victory, glory, and I had no expectations or demands regarding the level of play. I just sat down to enjoy one of my greatest heroes make one of, if not the final voyage of an epic journey. For the first time I watched to support Andy Murray for the reason all players once picked up a racket. Because we loved doing it. And though Andy lost the match, it left me more satisfied than after most of his titles, and more grateful than any moment of his career.

Andy Murray. Thanks for every last minute I got to watch. If you play again, I'll just sit and savour every second of it. And if you do not, it's been a hell of a ride all the same.

 

Munch

Semi-Pro
Today was perhaps the first time I sat down to watch Andy Murray with a more simple mentality. I was determined to sit down, and just support him no matter what happened. I didn't hope for victory, glory, and I had no expectations or demands regarding the level of play. I just sat down to enjoy one of my greatest heroes make one of, if not the final voyage of an epic journey. For the first time I watched to support Andy Murray for the reason all players once picked up a racket. Because we loved doing it. And though Andy lost the match, it left me more satisfied than after most of his titles, and more grateful than any moment of his career.
Well said, agree with every word. Sitting in the office at lunch time debating wether to buy a ticket and disappear out the back door and this is exactly why I would have regretted missing this opportunity forever. Exactly right, had no expectations just a desire to support him whole heartedly and try give something back for all the joy he has provided.
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
A message from one Sir to another.

''Another brilliant performance from Andy Murray today. Last game or not, he’s had an unbelievable career and a true legend of the sport. Lucky enough to see him win at Wimbledon. Wishing you all the best on whatever you go on to do mate.''


 

Zardoz7/12

Professional
That was such an awkward post match interview because I got the impression Andy was going to get another operation then try to come back again but they made out he was finished.

Was it a heat of the moment comment from Andy or does he really believe he can go under the knife again and comeback to try to end his career on his own terms?
 

Sysyphus

Talk Tennis Guru
That was such an awkward post match interview because I got the impression Andy was going to get another operation then try to come back again but they made out he was finished.

Was it a heat of the moment comment from Andy or does he really believe he can go under the knife again and comeback to try to end his career on his own terms?
Murray, who turns 32 in May and has reached five finals here, said: “I’ll probably decide in the next week or so. If I go ahead with the operation and I don’t recover well from it, then I don’t play again. I’m aware of that. I’ll be in less pain doing just normal things, like walking around and putting my shoes and socks on.
[...]
Murray said the operation – the same one which has helped the American doubles player, Bob Bryan, recover from similar hip pain – did not come with a specific healing time, and he would not undergo it just to play tennis again.

“You have to allow bones to heal and muscles to recover properly to give the operation the best chance of improving your quality of life. Me trying to get on a tennis court after two months just because I’m trying to get ready for Wimbledon might not be the best thing for my health in the future. I have to do the rehab properly, respect healing times, not rush anything. I don’t know exactly how long it would be.”
 

Munch

Semi-Pro
Didn't notice Kim in the stands for Andy's (potentially) last match. Wonder why she didn't come?
Yeah she wasn't there, I was trying to spot her.

Seem to remember her not being in Aus in 2017 (no idea about 2018) to look after the kids at home - so I assume it's the same reason?

Obviously, though, it's because she knows he isn't done yet and has many more years to go :D:D:D
 
Top