My thoughts on doubles as a singles player

beltsman

Legend
You might find this interesting, or not, but I am a singles player who rarely plays any doubles. When I do, it's just messing around with friends or super casual.

This weekend I played a few matches of serious doubles with dedicated doubles players (3.5-4.0 level). Here are my thoughts:
- it is fun, and the social aspect is fun.
- it's annoying feeling limited in shot selection and mainly playing half the court
- I liked using more slice to cut off angles from my opponent so my teammate gets an easy volley. More three dimensional tennis.
- I don't like how one return not on target is instantly punished and point over
- my net skills need work, of course. I felt like I performed as a C- at the net.
- I don't like how flat footed it feels at the net. Yes it's fun to put balls away, but I also hate feeling like a sitting duck.
- I miss controlling when I come to the net, like in singles (generally)
- I definitely appreciate the doubles skill set
- I enjoyed the "oohs" and "ahhs" from other players when I hit nice topspin shots/winners, since they don't really play that way.
- Dipping topspin shots at the feet were very fun to trouble my opponents with.
- I don't like having to worry about hitting my teammate in the back.

Overall a fun experience. I will play again. It's a nice change of pace but I still prefer singles.
 

DeeeFoo

Rookie
I'm someone who mostly plays doubles, so I found your post to be pretty interesting.

You definitely have to be more careful with your shot selection and where you place your ball. You said it annoys you, but this is one of the things that makes doubles fun for me. It forces you to think and not just rely on power. Good doubles players are extremely crafty, especially older folk.

Placing your returns is even more important in doubles, as I'm sure you've noticed. A weak return is punished by the net player. I think this makes it more fun, for the same reason as above. Also, if you notice the net player creeping towards the middle, few things are more satisfying than burning them down the line to keep them honest. Serving well is also emphasized, because if you hit a mediocre (floaty) serve, you just make your partner a target.

I know what you mean by the "sitting duck" feeling. Sometimes a whole point can go by without the net players ever touching the ball. This is why I force myself to poach more and be more proactive, so that I can get the other team to think about me. I don't want them to see me as a sitting duck.

I'm glad you had fun though. Playing doubles will definitely have benefits for your singles game.
 

Moon Shooter

Semi-Pro
I'm pretty fast (at least for my age and weight class) so I started out thinking singles would be better for me. But I have been pretty impressed with the amount of strategy and set ups you can use when you play doubles. I think it would be really fun and rewarding to get a person that I can strategize and play good doubles with.

You can be moving around quite a bit when you are at the net. Youtube has several videos that discuss this.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
If you are flat footed at the net you are doing it wrong. Of course most rec players are doing it wrong.

my net play is described by almost all my opposition as intimidating. If you aren’t working towards that then you’ve got some improvement to make. Poaches, feints, double feints, need to be in your repertoire so you can get in your opponents head and make life easier for your server.

nothing irks me more than a partner who only makes a move at net on a floater.
 

socallefty

Legend


You are flat-footed at the net likely because you are a doubles newbie. Watch these videos above.

Doubles is a different sport than singles and you should enjoy it for what it is and not constantly compare it to singles. It is fun if you gel with your partner who is about the same level as you or better. It is not fun if your partner is much worse than you and your opponents or if you are much worse than everyone else on the court. Read a book like “The Art of Doubles” and you will start understanding the %s for decision-making, movement patterns and tactics for doubles that those who play doubles for decades might intuitively know.
 

beltsman

Legend
If you are flat footed at the net you are doing it wrong. Of course most rec players are doing it wrong.

my net play is described by almost all my opposition as intimidating. If you aren’t working towards that then you’ve got some improvement to make. Poaches, feints, double feints, need to be in your repertoire so you can get in your opponents head and make life easier for your server.

nothing irks me more than a partner who only makes a move at net on a floater.
Oh yes, I know I suck.
 

beltsman

Legend


You are flat-footed at the net likely because you are a doubles newbie. Watch these videos above.

Doubles is a different sport than singles and you should enjoy it for what it is and not constantly compare it to singles. It is fun if you gel with your partner who is about the same level as you or better. It is not fun if your partner is much worse than you and your opponents or if you are much worse than everyone else on the court. Read a book like “The Art of Doubles” and you will start understanding the %s for decision-making, movement patterns and tactics for doubles that those who play doubles for decades might intuitively know.
Yes of course. Good vids. Thanks.
 

J D

Rookie
- Doubles definitely has a more social aspect - it's one of the reasons many less serious players like it.
- The challenge of smaller targets and knowing where to hit the ball are part of the doubles skill set. You will eventually get better at hitting smaller targets as you play more, but can improve much quicker by practicing those shots.
- Baseline slices gets eaten up by the net guy at higher levels of 4.0 and above, like a sausage in front of a pit bull.
- CC and down the line tight target returns are part of the doubles skill set, which also includes volleying, overheads, and a well-placed and unattackable second serve. These are the things that singles players tend to practice very little (to the consternation of those of us who get partnered with them).
- Doubles net play is a mind set. You have to be aggressive and create opportunities (and practice your volleying technique).
- Equipment can make a big difference at net. That's why many doubles players use a different type of frame. I feel like a sitting duck with my Blade 18x20 at net, too HH. Give me a different frame and I'm like, "Please hit the ball somewhere near me."
- Generally, the net position is in control in doubles (unless your volleying and overhead aren't solid). It is harder to finish points at net, but generally not hard to stay in control of points.
- Half of the doubles skill set is mental - knowing where to be, where to hit, etc.... The physical part is the same as singles, only with a premium placed on the less often used skills.
- Hitting a great GS winner in doubles is fun, but what about the other 99 points? The higher the level, the less winners you will get from the baseline.
- Shots at the feet of opponents are always great, even in singles.
- It's only a tennis ball, so backside shots to your partner aren't a big deal. It's less of an issue at higher levels where partners know enough to get out of the way or kneel.

At least 95% of the 70+ players I know play strictly doubles. I do know a few holdouts that insist on sticking to singles but consistently lose to less skilled younger players. It's just too tough to cover the whole court for an entire match as you slow down and lose stamina. So, you might as well learn how to play doubles now since you will be there one day (and practicing doubles skills will improve your singles game).
 

time_fly

Hall of Fame
Singles play requires more overall stamina and cardiovascular fitness, but if you are playing doubles correctly your legs should be fatigued by the end. Your position on the court should constantly be changing.

When I play doubles after playing a lot of singles, I realize that doubles volley skills are different. In singles you need to come forward and hit one or two solid volleys to end the point. In doubles I often hit the second volley going to the “open court”, only it isn’t so open because the other guy is there. You need to focus more on reaction volleys and hitting smaller targets.
 

iNeverSlice

Rookie
Singles play requires more overall stamina and cardiovascular fitness, but if you are playing doubles correctly your legs should be fatigued by the end. Your position on the court should constantly be changing.

When I play doubles after playing a lot of singles, I realize that doubles volley skills are different. In singles you need to come forward and hit one or two solid volleys to end the point. In doubles I often hit the second volley going to the “open court”, only it isn’t so open because the other guy is there. You need to focus more on reaction volleys and hitting smaller targets.
I don't think my legs have ever been fatigued after a doubles match.
 

RyanRF

Professional
I'm in a similar boat but have learned to break some bad habits/tendencies that often go along with 'singles specialists'. My doubles observations:
  • Cross-court baseline rallies are dumb. You're just begging to get poached or chip/charged. The first team forced to make a pass is most likely going to lose the point.
  • The advantage of being the serving team has less to do with you as server and more to do with your partner dominating the net. If you double-fault, you are not allowing your partner to use their positional advantage.
  • Always think about setting up to finish points at the net. Outlasting/outhitting from the baseline is a strategy for singles, but not doubles.
For me the only benefits of my singles expertise are the topspin dipping shot and my movement speed. Everything else feels like a completely different skillset.
 

Moon Shooter

Semi-Pro
I'm in a similar boat but have learned to break some bad habits/tendencies that often go along with 'singles specialists'. My doubles observations:
  • Cross-court baseline rallies are dumb. You're just begging to get poached or chip/charged. The first team forced to make a pass is most likely going to lose the point.
  • The advantage of being the serving team has less to do with you as server and more to do with your partner dominating the net. If you double-fault, you are not allowing your partner to use their positional advantage.
  • Always think about setting up to finish points at the net. Outlasting/outhitting from the baseline is a strategy for singles, but not doubles.
For me the only benefits of my singles expertise are the topspin dipping shot and my movement speed. Everything else feels like a completely different skillset.

It is interesting to think about. It seems the skills you learn in doubles can readily transfer to singles play but not necessarily the other way around. For example, hitting a deeper heavier forehand groundstroke might allow you to push your opponent off the court and help you create an angle in singles but not so much in doubles.
 

EggSalad

Rookie
You might find this interesting, or not, but I am a singles player who rarely plays any doubles. When I do, it's just messing around with friends or super casual.

This weekend I played a few matches of serious doubles with dedicated doubles players (3.5-4.0 level). Here are my thoughts:
- it is fun, and the social aspect is fun.
- it's annoying feeling limited in shot selection and mainly playing half the court
- I liked using more slice to cut off angles from my opponent so my teammate gets an easy volley. More three dimensional tennis.
- I don't like how one return not on target is instantly punished and point over
- my net skills need work, of course. I felt like I performed as a C- at the net.
- I don't like how flat footed it feels at the net. Yes it's fun to put balls away, but I also hate feeling like a sitting duck.
- I miss controlling when I come to the net, like in singles (generally)
- I definitely appreciate the doubles skill set
- I enjoyed the "oohs" and "ahhs" from other players when I hit nice topspin shots/winners, since they don't really play that way.
- Dipping topspin shots at the feet were very fun to trouble my opponents with.
- I don't like having to worry about hitting my teammate in the back.

Overall a fun experience. I will play again. It's a nice change of pace but I still prefer singles.
As someone who prefers singles but has been playing in a similar low level doubles league, I agree.

The only thing I’d mention is don’t be flat footed at the net. Keep your feet Constantly moving. Move forward and back and side to side as the point plays out. Moving forward and back is really important and gets you involved much ore while at the net.
 

DeeeFoo

Rookie
I'm in a similar boat but have learned to break some bad habits/tendencies that often go along with 'singles specialists'. My doubles observations:
  • Cross-court baseline rallies are dumb. You're just begging to get poached or chip/charged. The first team forced to make a pass is most likely going to lose the point.
  • The advantage of being the serving team has less to do with you as server and more to do with your partner dominating the net. If you double-fault, you are not allowing your partner to use their positional advantage.
  • Always think about setting up to finish points at the net. Outlasting/outhitting from the baseline is a strategy for singles, but not doubles.
For me the only benefits of my singles expertise are the topspin dipping shot and my movement speed. Everything else feels like a completely different skillset.
Great points. One piece of advice that I got from my high school coach is that "doubles is all about making your partner look good". And in a way he's right. I'm always trying to set up points in a way so that my partner is in an advantageous position to put away a volley.
 

norcal

Hall of Fame
Cross-court baseline rallies are dumb. You're just begging to get poached or chip/charged. The first team forced to make a pass is most likely going to lose the point.
Unfortunately the modern dubs game does not involve a lot of S&V (even at the pro level) so you see a TON of cross court baseline rallies - how is that dumb? Unless you S&V or your partner can put away the return you are going to be in a cross court rally. It's cat and mouse whether the opposing net player can poach or you can anticipate their poach and go down the line (or lob).
I personally S&V almost all the time in dubs and often approach off 2nd serve returns so I TRY not to get stuck in CC rallies - but they are a fact of life in modern dubs and the smart percentage play unless you S&V or C&C return.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
Drop/lob game in doubles? Not sure what level you're playing, but I can't imagine how that would work at all.
Cannot be serious. Thought the same way as my partner mentioned he would handle anything over our heads and asked if I covered anything short/at the net. Then II found out why.

Think badminton
 
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iNeverSlice

Rookie
Cannot be serious. Thought the same way as my partner mentioned he would handle anything over our heads and asked if I covered anything short/at the net. Then II found out why.

Think badminton
Again, not sure what level you're playing, but drop shots aren't really a thing in real doubles.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Again, not sure what level you're playing, but drop shots aren't really a thing in real doubles.
Depends on what you mean by a "drop shot".

I've certainly hit shots that intentionally stay in the forecourt many times in doubles especially against 2 back or 1 up/ 1 back formations. Usually they are drop volleys or half volleys, but I've even faked the OH smash and then just dinked one over to the side while the opponents are rushing back. And I've definitely played the low short slice game to bring a baseline player in to the net where I think I have an advantage.
 

iNeverSlice

Rookie
Depends on what you mean by a "drop shot".

I've certainly hit shots that intentionally stay in the forecourt many times in doubles especially against 2 back or 1 up/ 1 back formations. Usually they are drop volleys or half volleys, but I've even faked the OH smash and then just dinked one over to the side while the opponents are rushing back. And I've definitely played the low short slice game to bring a baseline player in to the net where I think I have an advantage.
That's a pretty different situation than playing a "drop/lob" game in doubles. Like I said, my legs have never been fatigued after a doubles match. There just isn't enough running for that.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
That's a pretty different situation than playing a "drop/lob" game in doubles. Like I said, my legs have never been fatigued after a doubles match. There just isn't enough running for that.
I think it also depends on the quality of serves in the doubles game. If the serves are really good, the points end a lot quicker and there is a lot less motion. If the serves are not so good and returners can reliably return balls back CC away from the net player, points are going to be extended and more activity happens.

Watching our club championships and the difference between men's B doubles and open doubles is stark. Different games.
 

iNeverSlice

Rookie
I think it also depends on the quality of serves in the doubles game. If the serves are really good, the points end a lot quicker and there is a lot less motion. If the serves are not so good and returners can reliably return balls back CC away from the net player, points are going to be extended and more activity happens.

Watching our club championships and the difference between men's B doubles and open doubles is stark. Different games.
i completely agree. Higher level doubles points are much, much shorter.
 

ichaseballs

Semi-Pro
best shot in doubles might be a deep topspin lob.
making opponents hit up with low shots is good strategy.

- I don't like how flat footed it feels at the net. Yes it's fun to put balls away, but I also hate feeling like a sitting duck.
you shouldn't be flat footed. you should not be "sitting" in one spot.
one strategy is to assume the ball is coming at you every time.
i've learned to keep my racquet in front of my left shoulder (as a righty) to make quick reflex blocks
 
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junior74

Talk Tennis Guru
Good thread!

I think singles players have lots to learn from doubles. One very particular element is the return of serve. In singles, I find myself neutralising a lot, when doubles in fact shows me I can play returns with more intent, especially 2nd serves.
 

n8dawg6

Legend
when im at the net in dubs i never stop moving. you also learn how good your “hands” are at the net in dubs. we all know that sitting duck feeling, but one thing i notice that sets apart higher level dubs players is how they still get a racquet on the bullets.

all that being said, i think you run about 3x more distance playing a singles match than dubs
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
when im at the net in dubs i never stop moving. you also learn how good your “hands” are at the net in dubs. we all know that sitting duck feeling, but one thing i notice that sets apart higher level dubs players is how they still get a racquet on the bullets.

all that being said, i think you run about 3x more distance playing a singles match than dubs
How much you run in either format depends on play style. I've played singles against ball bashers and never broken a sweat.

I think there's a name for doubles players that run 3x more in singles than they do in doubles: Bad doubles players.

Both formats should require you to move after every ball is struck if you are playing correctly. There's always a preferred position to be after you hit the shot and when you or your partner are receiving the shot. And it's not the same spot that you were standing when you last touched the ball.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Singles is about speed and endurance. Doubles is about precise execution and variety.

It's a pretty tough outing when you have a singles specialist as your doubles partners. They make SO many errors in positioning, shot selection, and missed opportunities, and they're not great at keeping the ball down. Sure, they can be more consistent from the baseline, often more powerful. But it takes a heck of a passing shot to beat two good volleyers at net for an entire match.

Part of the frustration you hear from me is that I'm 60. For the last 10 years, my teammates have been "aging out" of singles. What this looks like is a lady who was competitive in singles in her 30s and 40s hits 50. She then can't win at singles and figures she will now play doubles with me, someone who has been working on doubles skills the whole time. And the singles skills she is bringing to the table have atrophied, so she isn't exactly lighting up her opponents in doubles. It is very messy, and there is little you can do in the moment to improve things with a partner who is a decade behind in doubles shots and skills.

So, to OP, it's good you're playing some doubles now. It will help your net play, and if you live long enough, that's going to come in handy.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
‘A decade behind’ is a bit of hyperbole. If you’re a good singles player with good tennis fundamentals, you can learn doubles patterns pretty quickly. It’s not rocket science.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Singles is about speed and endurance. Doubles is about precise execution and variety.

It's a pretty tough outing when you have a singles specialist as your doubles partners. They make SO many errors in positioning, shot selection, and missed opportunities, and they're not great at keeping the ball down. Sure, they can be more consistent from the baseline, often more powerful. But it takes a heck of a passing shot to beat two good volleyers at net for an entire match.

Part of the frustration you hear from me is that I'm 60. For the last 10 years, my teammates have been "aging out" of singles. What this looks like is a lady who was competitive in singles in her 30s and 40s hits 50. She then can't win at singles and figures she will now play doubles with me, someone who has been working on doubles skills the whole time. And the singles skills she is bringing to the table have atrophied, so she isn't exactly lighting up her opponents in doubles. It is very messy, and there is little you can do in the moment to improve things with a partner who is a decade behind in doubles shots and skills.

So, to OP, it's good you're playing some doubles now. It will help your net play, and if you live long enough, that's going to come in handy.
I cannot entirely agree with you .... I am beginning to play a lot more singles. I would probably consider myself a "doubles specialist" and am much better trained/coached in doubles strategy so it is an eye-opening transition.

Singles is a lot more than just speed and endurance. I have both of those .... just now learning about the tactics and strategy. Speed and endurance will not win you a singles match against someone using proper strategy.

Case in point ... there is a lady in the 3.5 league ... I don't know exactly how old but she did play in the 75s in a senior tournament. I am faster than she, have more endurance, more power, more spin. She has strategy. She plays mostly singles. She is really hard to beat as she puts the ball where you are most uncomfortable and forces you to hit into her strengths. She loses against younger singles players but beats almost anyone who is not a "singles player" of any age. My record against her is an embarrassing 2-4.

I will agree with you completely that doubles strategy is entirely different and requires a lot more precision. On the dubs court I would prefer to avoid playing with a singles-only player, but happy to play against them!

I really enjoy both ... now at 50+ learning actual singles strategy from a coach, it might be a little late for me to ever become a strong singles player .... but maybe I can vie for that sole spot in the 40+ league ...
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
‘A decade behind’ is a bit of hyperbole. If you’re a good singles player with good tennis fundamentals, you can learn doubles patterns pretty quickly. It’s not rocket science.
That's assuming the person has the insight that doubles is a different game, instead of just singles with twice as many people, and is willing to invest the time in learning some of the fundamentals which make doubles a different game.

Many lack both traits.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
That's assuming the person has the insight that doubles is a different game, instead of just singles with twice as many people, and is willing to invest the time in learning some of the fundamentals which make doubles a different game.

Many lack both traits.
Definitely see the "Stuck in singles mode" guys that just won't change their style even years later. Just continue to make excuses that they are primarily singles players. I can often make it work when they are serving and returning but it's brutal when I'm serving or returning. Feels like I'm playing 1 vs 2 as my partner won't poach, will flub most volleys, and will tend to retreat if things get heated leaving court wide open.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
I cannot entirely agree with you .... I am beginning to play a lot more singles. I would probably consider myself a "doubles specialist" and am much better trained/coached in doubles strategy so it is an eye-opening transition.

Singles is a lot more than just speed and endurance. I have both of those .... just now learning about the tactics and strategy. Speed and endurance will not win you a singles match against someone using proper strategy.
I also decided to transition from being a doubles player to singles at age 50. I abandoned the effort quickly, but I did have a coach, and we did discuss strategy, which I will get to in a minute.

Maybe my effort to transition to singles could have succeeded, had I stuck with it. The reason I failed was that I was too inconsistent and had a miserable shot tolerance. People who love singles love a long rally. Me, I hate long rallies, so playing singles was really forcing a round peg into a square hole for me. And I found it kind of boring at the 3.5 level compared to the excitement of doubles.

Anyway, back to singles strategy. I found singles strategy to be pretty basic. Keep the ball deep. Recover your position. Play the ball crosscourt. Play approach shots DTL. The difficulty was in executing all of this when there was someone across the net trying very hard to prevent you from doing it.

Contrast this to doubles strategy. There are quite a lot of things to know, and you have to be aware of what's happening with three people instead of one. Heck, I don't have to tell you; you play doubles so you get it.

Will speed and endurance win you a singles match against someone using proper strategy? Yup. Happens all the time. Pushers often fit into the category. You can use proper singles strategy all day long, and they will still beat you until you have the shots that will defeat them. Now, I agree that if you have two players who are equal in speed and endurance and skill, but one is playing with zero strategy and the other is using typical, level-appropriate singles strategy, the one using proper strategy should win. Maybe, but the outcome also depends even more on mental strength, perhaps.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
I also decided to transition from being a doubles player to singles at age 50. I abandoned the effort quickly, but I did have a coach, and we did discuss strategy, which I will get to in a minute.

Maybe my effort to transition to singles could have succeeded, had I stuck with it. The reason I failed was that I was too inconsistent and had a miserable shot tolerance. People who love singles love a long rally. Me, I hate long rallies, so playing singles was really forcing a round peg into a square hole for me. And I found it kind of boring at the 3.5 level compared to the excitement of doubles.

Anyway, back to singles strategy. I found singles strategy to be pretty basic. Keep the ball deep. Recover your position. Play the ball crosscourt. Play approach shots DTL. The difficulty was in executing all of this when there was someone across the net trying very hard to prevent you from doing it.

Contrast this to doubles strategy. There are quite a lot of things to know, and you have to be aware of what's happening with three people instead of one. Heck, I don't have to tell you; you play doubles so you get it.

Will speed and endurance win you a singles match against someone using proper strategy? Yup. Happens all the time. Pushers often fit into the category. You can use proper singles strategy all day long, and they will still beat you until you have the shots that will defeat them. Now, I agree that if you have two players who are equal in speed and endurance and skill, but one is playing with zero strategy and the other is using typical, level-appropriate singles strategy, the one using proper strategy should win. Maybe, but the outcome also depends even more on mental strength, perhaps.
I have the best of both worlds. I play doubles matches (social) but only "hit" in singles (playing real serves and points but not counting, and informally determining when to hand over the serve to the other side).
 

iNeverSlice

Rookie
I think there's a name for doubles players that run 3x more in singles than they do in doubles: Bad doubles players.
This is one of the dumber things I've read on this board. Go watch professional singles and doubles and tell me that doubles players run anywhere near the amount singles players do.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
This is one of the dumber things I've read on this board. Go watch professional singles and doubles and tell me that doubles players run anywhere near the amount singles players do.
OK I just watched an Isner-Opelka match and then a Hingis-Paes doubles match and can definitively tell you that doubles players move way more than singles players.

We can keep degrading the convo if we want to make our points.

Playstyle and level determines the movement in rec tennis. 3.0 Pushers playing singles will move the most of any tennis players on the planet. No one can end a point at that level. 4.0 doubles players will move a lot because the serves at that level aren't strong enough to end points quickly like at pro levels and yet shots like lobs and angles are better developed and net play is stronger.

I've played statues in singles and doubles and people that run all over the place in both formats. Bottom line is that everyone should be moving in doubles and tennis between shots if they want to play well.
 

joeydivine

New User
‘A decade behind’ is a bit of hyperbole. If you’re a good singles player with good tennis fundamentals, you can learn doubles patterns pretty quickly. It’s not rocket science.
Agree - especially considering that most 3.5 level players I know haven't even been playing a decade - me included.
 

iNeverSlice

Rookie
OK I just watched an Isner-Opelka match and then a Hingis-Paes doubles match and can definitively tell you that doubles players move way more than singles players.

We can keep degrading the convo if we want to make our points.

Playstyle and level determines the movement in rec tennis. 3.0 Pushers playing singles will move the most of any tennis players on the planet. No one can end a point at that level. 4.0 doubles players will move a lot because the serves at that level aren't strong enough to end points quickly like at pro levels and yet shots like lobs and angles are better developed and net play is stronger.

I've played statues in singles and doubles and people that run all over the place in both formats. Bottom line is that everyone should be moving in doubles and tennis between shots if they want to play well.
Funny that you had to find the most extreme examples in each format in order to promote your original ridiculous statement. And then you make another one claiming 3.0 players run the most. The delusion on this board is off the charts. Bottom line, singles is a much harder game than doubles, and the better you are at it the more you work during a match.
 
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