MYTH OF HEAVY RACKET

I AM USINGA A HEAS SPEED PRO (310gm unstrung) with following customizations :
1. leather grip with adds 5gm extra
2. lead tape of 4gm at positions of 3,9 and 12 o'clock
3. 5 gm silicon in handle
WHICH MAKES THE UNSTRUNG WEIGHT OF RACKET TO 332gm
due to which I am able to produce more spin and even it has resulted in good muscle growth of my arm and muscles where as I have always heard from people that heavy rackets damage the wrist and arm and I am using it since 1.5 years regularly.
ANY COMMENTS ?
 

nov

Professional
I AM USINGA A HEAS SPEED PRO (310gm unstrung) with following customizations :
1. leather grip with adds 5gm extra
2. lead tape of 4gm at positions of 3,9 and 12 o'clock
3. 5 gm silicon in handle
WHICH MAKES THE UNSTRUNG WEIGHT OF RACKET TO 332gm
due to which I am able to produce more spin and even it has resulted in good muscle growth of my arm and muscles where as I have always heard from people that heavy rackets damage the wrist and arm and I am using it since 1.5 years regularly.
ANY COMMENTS ?
Arnold is it you?
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
What the heck is a "heavy" racket and what are the myths you are trying to dispel?

330 gm is not heavy. Many of us old folks grew up with wooden frames that were substantially heavier. I'd consider those as "heavy".
330 gm is more a mid weight frame. 350 gm and above would be heavy by today's standards. 310 and below are light frames. Most adult males probably are playing 320-340 gm frames when you add strings and overgrips.
 

Chalkdust

Semi-Pro
I AM USINGA A HEAS SPEED PRO (310gm unstrung) with following customizations :
1. leather grip with adds 5gm extra
2. lead tape of 4gm at positions of 3,9 and 12 o'clock
3. 5 gm silicon in handle
WHICH MAKES THE UNSTRUNG WEIGHT OF RACKET TO 332gm
due to which I am able to produce more spin and even it has resulted in good muscle growth of my arm and muscles where as I have always heard from people that heavy rackets damage the wrist and arm and I am using it since 1.5 years regularly.
ANY COMMENTS ?
332gm unstrung means about 350gm strung. It's on the heavier side of what you can buy stock, but is not really "heavy".
Probably what makes it feel heavy is the 12gm you added to the hoop. That probably increased swingweight by about 25gm. That frame has a stock swingweight about 325, so you are at about 350gm swingweight which is high.
There is no problem with this as long as you can maintain your swingspeed consistently for two or three hours of play without it dropping off.
 

Chalkdust

Semi-Pro
What the heck is a "heavy" racket and what are the myths you are trying to dispel?

330 gm is not heavy. Many of us old folks grew up with wooden frames that were substantially heavier. I'd consider those as "heavy".
330 gm is more a mid weight frame. 350 gm and above would be heavy by today's standards. 310 and below are light frames. Most adult males probably are playing 320-340 gm frames when you add strings and overgrips.
His strung weight is about 350 which is not heavy heavy, but is more than most are using (320-340 like you said).
More importantly his swingweight would be about 350 which is substantially more than most (around 320 I would think is typical; some players racquets might be 330 stock, more beginner racquets maybe 300-310).
 

veelium

Rookie
Should be fine but must be a heavy swingweight to swing around for longer matches.

Heavier racquets that one is able to swing are much better for your arm/shoulder than lighter racquets - always have been.
Lots of shoulder issues are incompatible with heavy frames.

It's usually better (provided you can swing it etc) for things like golfers/tennis elbow yes.
 

InSydeOut

Rookie
I find that lighter or even average rackets do not hold up well at all against weighty shots unless you are pinpointing the sweet spot and make contact out in front, which means your technique and timing needs to be on point. But right now I would rather practice not missing the sweet spot than adopt different technique for a heavier racket.
 

BlueB

Legend
332gm unstrung means about 350gm strung. It's on the heavier side of what you can buy stock, but is not really "heavy".
Probably what makes it feel heavy is the 12gm you added to the hoop. That probably increased swingweight by about 25gm. That frame has a stock swingweight about 325, so you are at about 350gm swingweight which is high.
There is no problem with this as long as you can maintain your swingspeed consistently for two or three hours of play without it dropping off.
Swing weight is not measured in grams.
 

slipgrip93

Professional
It's fine, what Grafil Injection posted in a recent thread about Djokovic's heavy racquet.

It's interesting that a typical amateur racket of 332g strung is just 28g less than a 'beast' of a racket that only 'He-Man' can swing, 360g. That difference is half the weight of a tennis ball, or considerably less than a normal little finger weighs. Meanwhile, 14 year-old Steffi Graf was fine with a 368g, 345 SW MAX 200G racket, and she used an even heavier frame when she was 12 years old (MAX 150G).
Monica Seles' racquet, Yonex RQ-380 was at 12.5oz/354g.

Roger Federer’s Wilson nSix-One Tour 90

RacquetMassBal. cmRDC FlexSwgwtLength
Roger’s360.531.66533027
Retail354.032.06632527
in ("Roger Federer's wilson nSixOne Tour 90")
 
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ariwibowo

Rookie
I AM USINGA A HEAS SPEED PRO (310gm unstrung) with following customizations :
1. leather grip with adds 5gm extra
2. lead tape of 4gm at positions of 3,9 and 12 o'clock
3. 5 gm silicon in handle
WHICH MAKES THE UNSTRUNG WEIGHT OF RACKET TO 332gm
due to which I am able to produce more spin and even it has resulted in good muscle growth of my arm and muscles where as I have always heard from people that heavy rackets damage the wrist and arm and I am using it since 1.5 years regularly.
ANY COMMENTS ?
you need proper technique to use heavy racquets. Dont flick your wrist when using heavy racquets.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I AM USINGA A HEAS SPEED PRO (310gm unstrung) with following customizations :
1. leather grip with adds 5gm extra
2. lead tape of 4gm at positions of 3,9 and 12 o'clock
3. 5 gm silicon in handle
WHICH MAKES THE UNSTRUNG WEIGHT OF RACKET TO 332gm
due to which I am able to produce more spin and even it has resulted in good muscle growth of my arm and muscles where as I have always heard from people that heavy rackets damage the wrist and arm and I am using it since 1.5 years regularly.
ANY COMMENTS ?
not heavy. Get better people.
 

guanzishou

G.O.A.T.
I weighed 44.5kg the last 2 decades or so, now I weigh 48 kg. I have been using 15 Oz racquets for 13 years and my right arm has definitely gotten bigger because of that. I don't have arm issues mainly because I use soft string setup, and the heavy racquet definitely help to reduce vibration on the racquet. The racquet feels very stable and solid on impact.
 
Last edited:
I weighed 44.5kg the last 2 decades or so, now I weigh 48 kg. I have been using 15 Oz racquets for 13 years and my right arm has definitely gotten bigger because of that. I don't have arm issues mainly because I use soft string setup, and the heavy racquet definitely help to reduce vibration on the racquet. The racquet feel very stable and solid on impact.
true the impact on the ball is really solid compared to light weight rackets and after playing with heavy rackets you can't not play with light rackets
 

Crocodile

Legend
I think the situation of what’s good for your body is a case of looking at many variables, not just one. If you are 2m tall and weigh 110 km you are probably going to use a heavier racquet than a 160cm person weighing in at 58kg. So that’s one variable;
Then you have things like your playing level, playing style and strengths, your age and your racquet history are all relevant factors along with pre existing injuries.
If we generalise a heavy racquet ( say 355g strung for example ) with a swing weight of around 330, well it’s going to be very solid and stable and it’s going to suit your traditional attacking type player who plays a lot of singles and likes to hit a heavy serve and come to the net. The racquet will absorb a lot of shock and won’t flutter when you try to place your volleys. However if you are an ageing player you may find that this spec will make your shoulder get tired especially by the time you are late in the 3rd set and this will affect the small tendons in your shoulder. The other thing of course is the beam type and lay up, the flex and the grip choice and string type and tension. Imagine using a Volkl C10 Pro or Pro Kennex Q Tour 325 if you haven’t played for a while and then play a long match. The current Q Tour 325 is not only a heavy frame with its 331SW but the shape of the beam and the lay up
of graphite and kinetic beads is such that it can be quite cumbersome to swing unless you are a very strong person.
Naturally as the racquet gets lighter it’s going to help small in stature players, those with modern styles and doubles players a bit more. The thing is however is that as the racquet gets lighter the manufacturers have to put more weight in the head and up the stiffness level, so that the racquet will remain stable at impact. Unless you are a small person, once you get a racquet that comes in under 300g unstrung weight with a strung swing weight in the low teens, well it’s going to be generally quite stiff and likely to be a more unstable which is why you shouldn’t string racquets under 300g in polyester, it will vibrate too much and cause problems.
The last thing I would like to share on this topic is that whatever racquet one chooses, make sure you test the racquet put in match type situations. That I feel with give you a true indication of whether the racquet is right for you or not.
 

guanzishou

G.O.A.T.
One of my coaches was a champion in inter club championship in Perth. He uses a very light oversized racquet and polyester string. When he volleys, his volleys don't look so stable and I can see his racquet wobble a bit and his volleys are not consistently deep. He was amazed when he saw me volleying, I consistently hit the volley deep to the baseline while he was hitting the balls to me during volley practice.
 

nov

Professional
Also depends on fitness level. As long as im exercising 3-4 times a week in gym + other stuff, racquet weight isnt an issue for me. But when i dont have time exercise and only play 1-2 times a week tennis, then its different story. Im 178cm and 80 kgs/175 pounds.
 
Hit with my 'new' MAX 150G for the first time last night. 370g, 33cm balance, 65sqi head. Estimated SW 355. Absolutely fine to hit with for an hour. Flat FHs, easy OHBHs. Volleys and serves great. Gave it to my coach and he was hitting flat missiles. Lovely soft feel, with absolute precision gives you the confidence to aim at the lines.

I followed up with my Aerogel 300. 308g, 32.5cm balance. 98sqi head. Estimated SW 315. Also fantastic, easier to hit, but probably not the precision.
 
Ehh to me it’s all about weight distribution. I have two tfight 305 xtcs and one RS. They all came in - 2 at 306 and one 305 to a T. Lol.

as long as the weight distribution is evenly balanced with a swing weight of 325 to 335- I’m ok. My tfights are 330-332sh. I add overgrip and a dampener and I’m rolling.
 

netlets

Semi-Pro
I think the situation of what’s good for your body is a case of looking at many variables, not just one. If you are 2m tall and weigh 110 km you are probably going to use a heavier racquet than a 160cm person weighing in at 58kg. So that’s one variable;
Then you have things like your playing level, playing style and strengths, your age and your racquet history are all relevant factors along with pre existing injuries.
If we generalise a heavy racquet ( say 355g strung for example ) with a swing weight of around 330, well it’s going to be very solid and stable and it’s going to suit your traditional attacking type player who plays a lot of singles and likes to hit a heavy serve and come to the net. The racquet will absorb a lot of shock and won’t flutter when you try to place your volleys. However if you are an ageing player you may find that this spec will make your shoulder get tired especially by the time you are late in the 3rd set and this will affect the small tendons in your shoulder. The other thing of course is the beam type and lay up, the flex and the grip choice and string type and tension. Imagine using a Volkl C10 Pro or Pro Kennex Q Tour 325 if you haven’t played for a while and then play a long match. The current Q Tour 325 is not only a heavy frame with its 331SW but the shape of the beam and the lay up
of graphite and kinetic beads is such that it can be quite cumbersome to swing unless you are a very strong person.
Naturally as the racquet gets lighter it’s going to help small in stature players, those with modern styles and doubles players a bit more. The thing is however is that as the racquet gets lighter the manufacturers have to put more weight in the head and up the stiffness level, so that the racquet will remain stable at impact. Unless you are a small person, once you get a racquet that comes in under 300g unstrung weight with a strung swing weight in the low teens, well it’s going to be generally quite stiff and likely to be a more unstable which is why you shouldn’t string racquets under 300g in polyester, it will vibrate too much and cause problems.
The last thing I would like to share on this topic is that whatever racquet one chooses, make sure you test the racquet put in match type situations. That I feel with give you a true indication of whether the racquet is right for you or not.
I'm with you except for playing matches with a demo racquet. If I'm going to switch racquets I prefer to do it in the winter when I don't play tournaments. I want at least a couple of months to get used to a racquet, figure out what string works best with what tension and gauge and if I need to add weight to the racquet or not. Demos are not usually that close to your specs and have to project what it would play like with lower tension, smaller grip, etc. I go by the rule of thumb - if I like the demo and I'm going to really like the racquet when I customize it to my liking. I normally change the tension once I buy a racquet at least a couple of times to find my sweetspot so to speak. I also play with and without tungsten tape and switch the strings as well.
 
I'm with you except for playing matches with a demo racquet. If I'm going to switch racquets I prefer to do it in the winter when I don't play tournaments. I want at least a couple of months to get used to a racquet, figure out what string works best with what tension and gauge and if I need to add weight to the racquet or not. Demos are not usually that close to your specs and have to project what it would play like with lower tension, smaller grip, etc. I go by the rule of thumb - if I like the demo and I'm going to really like the racquet when I customize it to my liking. I normally change the tension once I buy a racquet at least a couple of times to find my sweetspot so to speak. I also play with and without tungsten tape and switch the strings as well.
`
for me I tested out more than 40 strings and at last these are the guts that I prefer
HYBRID: babolot excel(16G) in mains at 50 lbs and luxilion alu power(16L G) at 47 lbs
FULL BED STRINGS:
1. TIER ONE BLACK NIGHT(16G) AT 49lbs in mains and. 46 lbs in cross
2. TIER ONE GHOST WHIRE(16G) at 49 lbs in mains and 46 lbs in cross
3. KIRSCHBAUM COMPETITION(17G) at 50 lbs

I also like babolot rpm blast 17g and head hawk touch 17g but the problem with both of them is that they loose tension completely after a play of 3 to 4 hours depending on surface and feel dead so need to cut them off

for grip I am using a head leather grip as a base grip and a 0.6 mm gamma supreme Overgrip , this combination of grip I am using since past 10 years as its perfect size for my hand
 

Fintft

Legend
I think the situation of what’s good for your body is a case of looking at many variables, not just one. If you are 2m tall and weigh 110 km you are probably going to use a heavier racquet than a 160cm person weighing in at 58kg. So that’s one variable;
Then you have things like your playing level, playing style and strengths, your age and your racquet history are all relevant factors along with pre existing injuries.
If we generalise a heavy racquet ( say 355g strung for example ) with a swing weight of around 330, well it’s going to be very solid and stable and it’s going to suit your traditional attacking type player who plays a lot of singles and likes to hit a heavy serve and come to the net. The racquet will absorb a lot of shock and won’t flutter when you try to place your volleys. However if you are an ageing player you may find that this spec will make your shoulder get tired especially by the time you are late in the 3rd set and this will affect the small tendons in your shoulder. The other thing of course is the beam type and lay up, the flex and the grip choice and string type and tension. Imagine using a Volkl C10 Pro or Pro Kennex Q Tour 325 if you haven’t played for a while and then play a long match. The current Q Tour 325 is not only a heavy frame with its 331SW but the shape of the beam and the lay up
of graphite and kinetic beads is such that it can be quite cumbersome to swing unless you are a very strong person.
Naturally as the racquet gets lighter it’s going to help small in stature players, those with modern styles and doubles players a bit more. The thing is however is that as the racquet gets lighter the manufacturers have to put more weight in the head and up the stiffness level, so that the racquet will remain stable at impact. Unless you are a small person, once you get a racquet that comes in under 300g unstrung weight with a strung swing weight in the low teens, well it’s going to be generally quite stiff and likely to be a more unstable which is why you shouldn’t string racquets under 300g in polyester, it will vibrate too much and cause problems.
The last thing I would like to share on this topic is that whatever racquet one chooses, make sure you test the racquet put in match type situations. That I feel with give you a true indication of whether the racquet is right for you or not.
True, but many amateurs swing too slowly with heavy racquets, something easier done with lighter racquets and good technique.
 

HeavyHitter

New User
I grew up with 350g+ frames when I was a junior in the 90's, Wilson 6.1 prostaff, Head prestige. Always gravitated towards high static weight, lower balance frames. Now that I'm not playing competitively anymore, I've been testing different setups and now playing 330g~ strung frames. I started to test lighter frames since I've been watching the next gen players using 330g~ frames and having good success on tour. What I realized is that its not the static weight but the swingweight of the frame is more important. Sinner uses 325g strung frame and has one of the biggest groundies on tour. Same with Alcaraz, he's using 328g frame and is now considered to have one of the biggest FH on tour. Both are using relatively low static weight but their swingweights are not that low. There are some trade-offs with each setup but at the end of the day, go with what feels good and improves your game.
 

ryushen21

Legend
I AM USINGA A HEAS SPEED PRO (310gm unstrung) with following customizations :
1. leather grip with adds 5gm extra
2. lead tape of 4gm at positions of 3,9 and 12 o'clock
3. 5 gm silicon in handle
WHICH MAKES THE UNSTRUNG WEIGHT OF RACKET TO 332gm
due to which I am able to produce more spin and even it has resulted in good muscle growth of my arm and muscles where as I have always heard from people that heavy rackets damage the wrist and arm and I am using it since 1.5 years regularly.
ANY COMMENTS ?
My 386g n6.1 95 just chuckled at you and said "That's cute." It's only fair to mention that the n6.1 is not my primary racquet anymore.

@Shroud is laughing at both of us.
 

Puyo

New User
In my opinion heavy rackets is not a myth, but my experience with Wilson Blade 104 implied a technological change.
I have been playing tennis for more than 40 years (actually 56 years old) and I compete in seniors in the Argentine league.
I was really surprised by this version of Blade.
I always played with control rackets (I'm not going to talk about wooden rackets, but I used them), Dunlop 200 and 300. Last 6 years with the Yonex DR98, wonderful racket.
A year ago my coach told me that I had to go to this Wilson Blade 104, I was not convinced: 290 gr and 104sq?? How am I going to control it?
I decided after several months of pain in the shoulder and elbow due to overloading the scapula.
I am amazed: great control, I understand because of the 22.5 beam, extraordinary flexibility that makes it a racket with a great feel.
Its extension of 27.5 is not felt, perhaps for better in serves and volleys.
Very maneuverable at net and to execute the slice.
Much more permissive to hits outside the sweet spot due to the 104 sq, which are more usual when one does not reach the legs well or we see worse.
Just try to get more topspin on groundstrokes against aggressive players.
For the first time in many years I sense that there was a technological improvement (something that the Clash line has?).
It's obviously not a racket for pros or young players who compete, but for senior players of a good level who have technique but start to lose strength or athleticism (compare with 30s or 40s), it's a very good option in my opinion.
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
-i favor the w.blades/h.rad.pro racquets, not too heavy,, but i find myself often across the net from the w.ps.RF (much heavier)
-the wallop that the rf can produce is special!!, very few "new model" racquets can match it
-the yonex.vcore.pro.97H (330g) is another
-the feel of the smack ,(of the heavy stick) against a felt-covered-ball is laughable at times!!
-the ball does not exists to a "club of war!!" :happydevil:(y)
 

babar

Professional
I began tennis with a POG in the late 80s and ended up with a Wilson 6.1 around 2000.
Those are the 2 frames I played with most over the years.
I have strayed and tried and played with almost everything under the Sun as I am a new racquet addict.

My body just can't handle the RF type weight anymore and as such, I play with the heaviest frame that I can swing with consistency over 3 sets.
Lately, it's the Speed MP, but lots of folks are telling me to try the Blade 104. Just scared of the extra length.
But, I lose to guys playing with old Wilson 6.2 OS frames and 6'3" guys playing with PS 97Ls.
Whatever works for your technique, size, age, desire, then you should use it.
If you like the green racquet and you feel good playing with it, then use that.
 

FuzzyYellowBalls

Hall of Fame
Well, I've seen a disconnect between what people feel good playing with and what would win them matches for sure. Maybe this visual is interesting. If I see someone with an RF weight who isn't swinging it as fast as the 6'3" guy swings his PS 97L or can't wrist lag and whip the hell out of the ball, they are just smoothly swinging the RF like a nice slow consistent pendulum and making contact but not swinging hard enough to make poly strings snap back, then I know they are holding back their potential in tennis.
 

babar

Professional
Well, I've seen a disconnect between what people feel good playing with and what would win them matches for sure. Maybe this visual is interesting. If I see someone with an RF weight who isn't swinging it as fast as the 6'3" guy swings his PS 97L or can't wrist lag and whip the hell out of the ball, they are just smoothly swinging the RF like a nice slow consistent pendulum and making contact but not swinging hard enough to make poly strings snap back, then I know they are holding back their potential in tennis.
I agree, but I'm not arguing the point of tennis potential.
I do feel that swinging the heaviest racquet you can swing comfortably over the course of 3 sets and maybe a couple of matches a day, is the best way to go.
However, I feel the 6'3" guy could benefit from a heavier frame. Also, he is in his early 30s and in fairly good shape, so an RF 97 would not be overly taxing from my point of view.
But he doesn't like the heavier frames. He tried the more recent Yonex VCORE 330g frames and the PK Black Ace, but no dice.
He just likes the lighter feel of the PS 97L.
I've taken matches off this guy and I do feel when he tries to finesses the ball, the lack of weight hurts his shots.
His slice would be more penetrating and stay lower with a heavier frame, but they tend to pop-up more with his light racquet. His serve has decent speed, but not very much weight.
He is able to hit a heavy forehand, but could be heavier with a heavier frame.
Potential aside, if he likes to use the light frame, then more power to him.
 

FuzzyYellowBalls

Hall of Fame
But he doesn't like the heavier frames. He tried the more recent Yonex VCORE 330g frames and the PK Black Ace, but no dice.
I understand him, I'm 6'4" 200 pounds, the Vcore H is a little tough to maneuver on kick serves and running defensive shots in singles. Doubles, the compromises in maneuverability don't matter much, but in singles, it's a beast.
 

babar

Professional
The cx 200 OS also has a small cult following if you want something big without the extra length.
I tried the CX 200 OS demo a while back. It was strung with a soft multi which felt good, but the frame required a bit too much swing on my part to get power and depth.
Very nice looking frames the new CX line of racquets though.
 
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