Nadal News 2.0

I didn't realize Tio Miguel Angel's career lasted so long and bumped into Rafa's. What a time that must have been for the Nadal family. :)
https://thesefootballtimes.co/2019/...ration-of-the-nadal-familys-mastery-in-sport/

Before Rafa came Miguel Ángel: in celebration of the Nadal family’s mastery in sport

There was once a time when Rafa Nadal was known as “Miguel Ángel’s nephew”, before the tables turned and Miguel Ángel was rechristened “Rafa’s uncle”.

Take the last weekend of June in 2003 as an example. On 27 June, Rafa was knocked out of his first ever grand slam, after becoming the youngest male to reach the third round of Wimbledon since Boris Becker did so 19 years previously. The 17-year-old of limitless promise had taken on the 12th seed Paradorn Srichaphan and, even though he lost, he was applauded out of SW19 after what he called “a good tournament in which I played at a very high level”.

Yet Saturday’s newspapers back in Spain weren’t focused on the teenager. The only front page references to the Nadal family were for his uncle. That’s because Miguel Ángel was competing in the Copa del Rey final that Saturday evening.

The 36-year-old defender had already won the tournament during his trophy-laden career at Barcelona. Born in Mallorca, Miguel Ángel had started out at local side Manacor and then moved to the island’s giants Real Mallorca in 1986. After five up-and-down seasons with Los Bermellones, he was signed by Johan Cruyff’s Barcelona and won the Spanish Super Cup, the LaLiga title and the European Cup, the first in the Catalan club’s history, during his debut campaign in Catalonia.

While he didn’t feature in the final against Sampdoria, he did make nine appearances during that European run and was a valued member of the squad.

Three more trophies followed the following season, in 1992/93, as the Blaugrana won the Spanish and European Super Cups, plus another league title. Throughout his time in the Catalan capital, silverware was never far away for the Mallorcan and he collected 15 medals during his eight seasons at the Camp Nou.

An increasingly regular starter through his first few years in Barcelona, he even captained the side on a handful of occasions and became one of their most dependable players. He didn’t play 295 games for the club; he played the same game 295 times, reliably like clockwork. Even after Cruyff departed in 1996, the new coach Bobby Robson was so impressed with him that he helped keep the Spaniard at the club when he had been very close to a summer transfer to Manchester United.

“I don’t want him to go,” Robson said at the height of the transfer speculation. “He is very important to us, an outstanding player. I do not want to strengthen someone else’s team and weaken mine. At the moment they are offering reasonable money, but we would rather have the player. He is even better than I thought. I knew he was a good player, but when you work with someone you see their quality.”

So the defender didn’t go to England and remained in Catalonia, where he continued to impress and win titles. Eventually, though, his Catalan adventure reached its conclusion and a return to Real Mallorca materialised in the summer of 1999 for their first season at their current ground, the Estadi de Son Moix.

It was there that he finished his career and it was there that he underlined his status as a legend of Spanish football by playing for six more seasons up to the age of 38 and producing some of the best football of his career.

With Miguel Ángel as the cornerstone of the side, Real Mallorca achieved Champions League qualification by finishing third in the 2000/01 season, ahead of his former club Barcelona. Although they didn’t pass through the group stages of Europe’s premier competition, despite earning nine points and defeating Arsenal, Schalke and Panathinaikos, the best was yet to come for the Balearic club.

After coming second in the Copa del Rey campaigns of 1990/91 and 1997/98, Real Mallorca were hoping to make it third time lucky on that early summer’s evening of 28 June 2003. Miguel Ángel had been involved in two previous finals, finishing on the losing side in the 1-0 extra-time loss against Atlético Madrid at the Santiago Bernabéu in 1991 and on the winning side as Barcelona conquered the islanders on penalties at the Estadio Mestalla in 1998.

This time, Miguel Ángel lifted the trophy again; this time he did in Mallorcan red and captain no less. Recreativo Huelva were demolished in the final in Elche by a 3-0 scoreline thanks to a Walter Pandiani penalty and two further goals from Samuel Eto’o. The captain was gladiatorial in defence as he helped contribute to the clean sheet. “We finally achieved our objective,” the captain said afterwards. “Now it’s time to enjoy it.”

It made it a happy ending to a weekend of lows and highs for the Nadal family. While young Rafa was an up-and-comer in the tennis world, his time in the spotlight was still to come. This was the weekend of Miguel Ángel.

It was in 2005 that the torch was passed from uncle to nephew, from football to tennis. Miguel Ángel announced his retirement in the spring, just as Rafa was about to embark on his historic clay court season, during which he won 24 consecutive matches and claimed his first grand slam title by winning the French Open at Roland-Garros at the age of 18.

...../2
 
2/
They two Nadals even met on the football pitch that summer during the former Mallorca captain’s testimonial. Icons such as Hristo Stoichkov, Pep Guardiola, Luis Enrique and Johan Cruyff all turned out for the match in Son Servera in Mallorca, with Rafa playing as well, scoring the only goal for a Spain and Real Mallorca combined XI in the 1-1 draw against the legends of the Barcelona Dream Team.

From there, Rafa went on to become one of the most famous and most decorated sportsmen in Spanish history. With 17 grand slam titles, only Roger Federer is ahead of him in his sport. He is truly one of the all-time greats and has eclipsed what his uncle achieved on the football pitch. Through it all, though, he has remained a humble champion and admits that he owes a lot to the lessons taught to him by Miguel Ángel.

“The fact that my uncle was a footballer helped me and my family to be calm in this environment,” the tennis star explained many years later while at the peak of his powers. “Above all, he is a great sportsman. He may have had a brilliant career in a footballing sense, but he is a great sportsman in general and has helped me in this department,” he added, highlighting the uncle’s love for golf and for tennis in addition to the sport he played, with Miguel Ángel even having trained Rafa on a couple of rare occasions when the famous Uncle Toni wasn’t around to do so.

To say Rafa wouldn’t have made it without his uncle having previously stepped foot into the world of sport would be retro-engineering in the extreme, but it certainly helped.

While the tennis star has achieved much greater worldwide fame than his uncle, they’re both highly regarded in Spain. Miguel Ángel represented the national team on 62 occasions, putting him in the top 25 on the all-time list for caps, and he captained his country on occasion too.

His career with La Roja wasn’t always the happiest, being sent off in a group stage draw with South Korea at the 1994 World Cup and missing the decisive penalty in the Euro 96 quarter-final against England after neutralising Alan Shearer so impressively for 120 minutes. Yet there were many highlights as well, with Miguel Ángel having been so crucial in his side’s 1994 qualification with a historic performance in Dublin against Ireland in a qualifying win. The newspapers back in Spain game him four stars out of three.

While he didn’t win any titles with Spain, golden moments were to come for the Nadal family thanks to Rafa’s triumphs while wearing red at the 2008 and 2016 Olympic Games and during Spain’s successful Davis Cup campaigns of 2004, 2008, 2009 and 2011.

The entire family celebrated those successes, just as they’d all toasted the victories of Miguel Ángel all those years previously. Even Rafa, who has always been a devout Real Madrid fan and who has even been touted as a possible presidential successor to Florentino Pérez, became a fan of Barcelona on occasion, so strong was the will to see the family do well.

Rafa was even pictured in a Barcelona shirt alongside his uncle on the Camp Nou pitch at the age of nine. “We managed to get a Madridista to celebrate a title of Barcelona’s, or a few of them, and to become a Barcelona sympathiser, but we couldn’t get him to fully convert to become a culé,” Miguel Ángel joked years later during a reunion of the Dream Team.

“When my brother played at Barcelona Rafa wanted Barcelona to win, but was never fully convinced because he was fanatical about Real Madrid and when my brother returned to Real Mallorca he was able to switch back again,” Uncle Toni added.

Just as Rafa celebrated his uncle’s successes, even those achieved in blue and red, Miguel Ángel is regularly pictured in the stands as his nephew claims title after title on the court. It’s an impressive family box. As well as Miguel Ángel and Toni, the brothers who look so alike, there was Rafa’s grandfather of the same name who was an orchestral conductor and another uncle named Rafa with a career in politics.

Miguel Ángel’s son of the same name pursued a career in football too and spent some time at Real Mallorca. Rafa’s parents, Ana María and Sebastián, have been by his side throughout, as has his long-term partner Xisca Perelló, who he married in 2019. little editorial oopsie there!

Some families are simply meant to win. Whether on the grass of Wimbledon or the grass of the Camp Nou, the tennis player and the centre-back both had the task of keeping balls from hitting nets. Rafa and Miguel Ángel Nadal were and are two of the very best in their professions. They have been and will be known as each other’s nephew and uncle, but they’ve both made their own name for themselves. They’ve both achieved glory as a Nadal.
 
This is the article from the magazine that Octobrina posted. https://t.co/aMLces5QLy


Our collective memory is full of milestones, situations and characters that connect us and help maintain social cohesion. We tend to cling to these day-to-day references to reassure us that we’re still alive, that we haven’t steered off course. That we are part of something bigger than ourselves. Rafa Nadal is one of these icons, an anchor that has a lot more to tell us about besides his athletic success. He goes beyond that. Nadal has become a cultural icon thanks to his humility, despite his grandeur, and thanks to his sportsmanship, despite competing in an individual discipline, which is, by definition, selfish. Also thanks to his modesty and accesibility, despite the fact that he has long been an established star. Nadal will be remembered as one of the best players in the History of tennis, of course, but also as a role model who serves as an example of how to handle failure, and, especially, success.

By now, you may well have lost count of how many years you’ve been at the top. What drives you to pick up the tennis racket each day?
The main thing that drives me to train each day is my passion for the sport and for competition. It’s something I like, so I enjoy doing it. It’s true I’ve been at it for years, and I can’t say I am the same as day 1 of my career, because it’s different now. But I still have this desire to better myself and keep improving my game.

Your mental fortitude seems intact. And your mindset has no doubt benefited from experience. Is the battle you’re now fighting against your own body? This year, you cancelled your tour of Asia because of your knee…
No, no, the whole issue of injuries is a hindrance, it doesn’t benefit me. In my case, I wish I hadn’t had injuries, or at least not so many of them. Injuries limit your capacity to compete.

How do you adapt your tennis playing to face the future after so many years of competing at the top and with so many younger players threatening to kick the door down.
We all need to adapt to the times. No just in sports, but in any other area of life. As far as tennis is concerned, it’s normal for players improve in their game and become more well-rounded player, so we have to keep getting better ourselves to stay at the top.

What professional challenges have you set for yourself for the next two or three years?
It’s hard to say. The main thing is to have physical endurance and be in shape to compete at the highest level.

How has tennis changed since you first began, when you were a child player going from tournament to tournament within the Balearic Islands?
Tennis in general has changed a lot over these years. That’s normal, it’s a law of nature in this sport. Evidently, my tennis playing has also evolved in every sense. It has changed in just about every respect, including technical aspects. But especially as far as speed.

Do you see any young players in the circuit who might be ready to take over the baton from the historic Nadal-Federer Djokovic triad?
There are a lot of players with great potential, but then you have to be there in every tournament and be constant. Maybe this constancy is still missing, but there’s definitely a lot of quality. It would be hard to point out one or two players in particular. Like said, there are many.

Do you remember the first tournament you won?
Yes, of course. My first ATP professional tournament was in Sopot, Poland. My first Grand Slam was Roland Garros.

What has been your most special tournament since that 2004 Davis Cup?
Fortunately, there have been many very special tournaments. I couldn’t possibly forget any of them. But no doubt Roland Garros is very special for me. Also Wimbledon 2008 with Federer, and Monte Carlo and Barcelona, two tournaments with a deep-rooted tradition behind them. Or my first tournament in Madrid, which was in an indoor court… I mean, I’ve had the chance to celebrate wins in many different places.

You’ve created the Rafa Nadal Academy by Movistar in order to not only initiate young players in the racket sport, but also teach them everything you’ve learned throughout your career. What are the fundamental rules that should be engraved in every student’s soul?
There are many, because, when it comes to athletic education, the work cannot be limited to simply teaching them to hit a ball or physical training. We try to transmit values that are also important for a person’s life. These are values that must also be present in sport.

Your professional career has very close ties to the Balearic Islands. You own several businesses with Abel Matutes Prats, including the restaurant Tatel, where Cristiano Ronaldo is also a partner. How would you define the restaurant’s concept?
I see it as a modern and contemporary concept. Travelling around the world playing tennis has given me the chance to visit many places with good restaurants, and I’ve tried concepts that I really liked a lot. Whenever I’m in Madrid, I usually have dinner at Tatel.

And, in November, you’re also opening your academy at Mexico’s new showpiece hotel, Palladium’s Grand Palladium Costa Mujeres Resort & Spa. What makes this new collaboration so noteworthy?
I think it’s a very interesting project in a beautiful place that will captivate anyone who visits it. I think that our center at this hotel will be very interesting for all tennis fans.

You are directly involved in your tennis academy, which is based in Manacor, in Mallorca. What advice would you give children, youngsters or adults who decide to sign up?
Yes, of course I’m involved. That’s crucial. To date, I’ve gotten very involved as far as the concept, and right now I’m training there. And when I’m not participating in a tournament, it’s also my training base. But I also like to be with the kids, train with them and participate in activities.

What do you value the most about a partner when it comes to opening a business?
There are many things to take into account. Evidently, loyalty is an important factor. As is friendship. And, above all, know-how and being a good fit.

You are very familiar with Ibiza and Formentera, both their beaches and their leisure offerings. You have often been seen at Usuhaïa. What do you like about this venue that has revolutionized the market in Ibiza?
Since I’m from the Balearic Islands, I’m familiar with the islands and I like each and every one of them. Ibiza is world-famous, and Usuhaïa has managed to become a world leader. I think it offers one of the best atmospheres you can possibly find.

What do you think about the impact Usuhaïa has had in the hotel and music worlds? The brand is known all over the world.
It has managed to position itself worldwide and become known everywhere, and it’s also helped promote Spain and Illes Balears.

Do you like electronic music?
Not as much as I like Latin and Spanish music, to be honest…

After so many years of travelling almost every week, have you developed an aversion to airplanes or hotels? What is, for you, the worst part about living out of a suitcase?
No, no, I have no aversion at all. I think those of us who are at the top of the tennis world are tremendously fortunate, because we stay at good hotels and travel in comfortable airplanes. We are very fortunate, because we make a living doing the thing we love most. That’s the case with me.

Do you have as many obsessions in your day-to-day life as you do on the tennis court?
Not as many… but I do have some, which I’m not about to share (laughter).

What advice would you give parents of players with potential to reach the top?
Above all, that it should be something the boy or girl wants to do, and that they should enjoy it. You shouldn’t force them in that sense. It should be enjoyable for the child.

I understand you could have been a good soccer player and that you’re a loyal fan of Real Madrid.
I don’t know about that… Although, it I do really like soccer and I wasn’t all that bad. But I’m glad I chose tennis…

You know Cristiano Ronaldo. Are you sorry he left Real Madrid? Don’t you think Real Madrid will benefit from not having to play for a single player?
Yes, I know him and I think he’s done great things for Real Madrid. He’ll always be part of the history of the club.

One of your passions is the sea. And your friends. How do you imagine life after retirement?
I really like the sea, and I go sailing whenever I have the chance. That’s nothing new, I’ve liked it since I was a child
 
Excellent interview with Rafa, translated by the wonderful nou.ami for VamosBrigade. :)

An interview with Rafael Nadal in Acapulco

Acapulco | 28 Feb 2019
By Enrique Yunta | Translated by nou.amic for ='http://www.VamosBrigade.com]www.VamosBrigade.com

It was already dark in this sensational corner of the Pacific when Rafael Nadal finished his practice with David Ferrer on one of the courts furthest from the Pegaso Stadium in Apaculco, embraced his friend, who he had beaten in a one set match, and then attended to the local press who had been expecting him for days..

Once he had finished the press conference, now after nine at night, he invited ABC to accompany him in the car he had been assigned to the villa where he was staying, for in Acapulco he is put up in the most exclusive part of the Princess hotel, in an amazing house right on the edge of the beach smelling of the sea, something basic in his life. He asks how the newspaper is doing and gives answers on whatever topic comes up, speaking more as a citizen than as a tennis player. Because Nadal, as he himself says, is an ordinary person who is concerned about everyday things, what is going on in Spain and abroad. And then there is the tennis, of course, improving as much as he can on an extraordinary career which is getting closer and closer to its end, but is more alive than ever. He feeds it with his passion.

What signs do you get that you're 32 years old?

-Bufff. Well, personally I don't feel it in the day to day work, not too much. What is true is that as you analyse the things that have been happening, you realise there have been more glitches than you wanted. This past year, for example. There are times when you get tired of seeing so many things happening one after another. But, fortunately, my enthusiasm is unimpaired, my desire to go to practice and really enjoy myself is still there. More especially when I'm fit and well, of course.

Can mind be put over matter?

- That depends. Of course, if you're body won't let your mind act, you can do no more there. But I do dare to say that, with certain qualifications, your head can rule over your body. If you tear a muscle, your head counts for nothing, no matter how focused you are or how much heart you put into it. What your head does do is help you to return with energy and hunger and to maintain your enthusiasm.

Do you work on this aspect?

- I worked on it a lot as a youngster, but not now. Look, everybody works on the mental aspect in their daily work. I think it's vital not to put leisure before training. I think there's time for everything in this life. But I do the training and then the things I want to do, not forgetting what comes first.

Are you a tennis player all day long?

- No, not at all. I've never been that, not now nor in my whole life.

But for how long do you put it out of your thoughts?

- Of course I think about tennis, I think about it many times a day. I think about what I've done badly, what I've done well, about why one thing turned out like this for me and another like that... But I'm not obsessed about tennis and never have been. The thing is I've always been really determined to work hard and to be a better player. When you have that determination for both these things to occur, indirectly, you do at many moments think about what to do.

When was the last time you got angry?

-(Thinks for quite a while).

I don't know. Buff.. honestly, I rarely get angry. You know what happens. If I get angry it's usually just for a moment and then it's quickly gone. I really don't like arguing. If it's not absolutely necessary, I try to avoid problems. People say that when there's a problem you have to attack it, and I say that maybe it's better if you can avoid it. Avoid the confrontation, that is. Obviously. If there's something you don't like about somebody or they have done something to you, it can help to go and speak directly face to face to them about it. There's a series of things you have no other option but to solve like that, but many others are not so important. And, with all those less relevant things, I usually swerve to one side or the other and avoid the problem. Life is much more pleasant if one tries not to have problems or arguments.

It's very difficult nowadays not to have arguments or confront someone about something. Have you noticed there's a lot of tension?

- I personally don't like it. To be honest, it's not my style. I don't like continuous confrontation, about anything. In fact, I have followed the whole Catalonia issue and there comes a time when one doesn't understand why it gets so entangled. Without any doubt, there are times when it's necessary to argue and discuss, that there are different opinions to improve things, but, I don't like such very long drawn out confrontation at all. I'm sure whoever's in charge does some things well and others not so well. But I don't like this way of criticising everyone else. And everybody does it. Why should we be confronting one another all day? Society is being radicalized and I don't like it.

Are we creating a world of extremes?

- Well, I don't know if we're living in extremes. But, you know. It's so complicated to reach agreements because there's too much tension between everyone and, from my point of view, that's not good. It can't be good. There needs to be more respect and a willingness to move forward. And to move forward, you have to understand each other.

Do you talk about this with your folk. Do you discuss it with friends?

- Yes. We usually talk about life, what's in the news, what's happening.. Every day we comment on everything that happens on all levels: politics, sports, things about life, everyday things, what affects the family..

Do you like to be asked things that are not about tennis? Do you have to be careful what you say?

- First of all, I'm just another Spanish citizen and I'm interested in and worried about the things that happen to us, just like everybody else. We're also citizens of the world, we have our lifes. As I've said, before being a tennis player, I'm like you or anybody else.

But, do you hold back from saying certain things?

- Yes, obviously. Well, not in confidence when I'm with friends. But, when I'm in front of the media or people I don't know I'm more prudent and can't say certain things, or rather I don't want to say them because saying them wouldn't solve anything.

Have you ever been tempted by politics or do you prefer to keep your distance?

- Politics is a very important part of our society, but no, no it's not my field. It would be logical for me never to be in the world of politics. Well, never say never, but I think it's almost impossible. But if I was in politics, I'd try to do it another way, try to be more positive. Look, there's one thing I don't like: we're almost always talking negatively about our country. I personally travel to places all over the world each week and the citizens of Spain are not aware of everything we have, of how well we live in general terms. Of course there are people who have a hard time, no doubt about that. And of course there are things we need to improve, no doubt about that. We ought to be concerned about more people living better because that will make the country function better. Countries have problems when there are great differences, when there are rich people and far too many who have very little. That's when there is conflict. I'm not saying our country is perfect, but when you travel, you realise how lucky we are. In the standard of health care, of education.. There are many aspects of Spain that we're always criticising and I always say one thing: travel to countries we consider to be so far above ours and go to a hospital to see how things function there... We'll see then if they're as superior as is thought..

And you, a product of all Spaniards who rarely generates debate, are into all this debate about extremes.

- It's not that, either. Nobody creates unanimity. I've never manifested myself politically, I never will, but I believe in people more than any other thing. I don't like peope who see bad in everything. You might have an affinity with one party or another, what does that matter. What's important is that there's no confrontation, that they're not so illogical. Everyone is free to vote for or support whoever suits him and that is to be respected. What's important is that we all want a better country, a more just one, and that we help one another in order to improve.

..../2
 
2/......

You have your academy in Mallorca and now you've opened one in Costa Mujeres (on the Caribbean coast of Mexico, near Can cun) and many children sign up to be like you. Is that what you're proudest of?

-No, no. No, because there are many children who want to be like big stars who I don't think are references. The most important thing is to be a good person and help people. Then you have to transmit values suitable for children and have them look to you with a view to the future. So, I'm telling you: my greatest satisfaction is to be able to represent something positive to all these children. I don't know if I do it, but that is my great satisfaction. There are many children who want to be like figures who, without entering into naming names, I don't think can be a good example for children.

You confessed you were scared to remain at home alone when you were a child. Are you still frightened of that?

- Yes, I don't much like being alone at home. I'm not a great follower of that, ha, ha!

But is it being alone that scares you or in case something happens?

- Well, fear fear.. I do stay at home alone, I have no problem with that! But I prefer to have company.

Are you capricious?

- Not much, honestly. I don't think I'm very capricious. Well, I'm sure we all have our whims. I have a boat. My whim is really the sea, more than anything else. Everything related to the sea gives me the possibility of disconnecting from everything else. I love it, if I have the chance to have that escape it helps me a lot.

Would you like to have a week of being anonymous?

- Yes, why not. But you'll never ever hear me say I'm tired of being who I am. No. Life has given me too many good things for me to complain. In the end, the most important thing is that wherever I go I feel loved and supported by people. That's what one misses most when one is sidelined.

Without wanting to go into discussing your private affairs, you were recently in the news for helping after the tragedy in Mallorca and because of the news about your wedding. Does it annoy you that your private life is talked about?

- What I don't like is the circus. When you get into that ring, they tell many lies about you. What happened in Mallorca, I find it hard to talk about it because it was a very difficult time for all of us. People have no idea, but half my family live there, my mother's family is from that town (Sant Llorenç). I only went along to help a bit and to see how things were. I went with my friends, I didn't go seeking anything because it's obvious I don't need it. I went to help, with my childhood friends. Afterwards they made up stories and I only did the same as anybody else. What happens is that I did it, and I'm a public figure, but I didn't do any more or any less than any one of my friends. It's that simple. All the rest is circus. About the wedding: I've never confirmed this or talked about it. But, more than bother me, it doesn't bother me at all, it enters into the circus ring of speculation, opinions and lies... In the end, people give their opinion freely and the most outrageous things are said. Where I'm getting married, if the stag party is in one place or another.. Rather than it bothering me, we have a good laugh. There are so few things that are true! You know you're exposed to this, but I've always wanted to be in the news for what I've done on a tennis court. In my private life, I've tried to live a quiet life, be happy being anonymous in my private life, and we've always wanted it that way both my partner and I and also my family. It's the way to live more peacefully and to find happiness, it's better like that

How many people have your telephone number?

- I don't know. Unfortunately there are times when I don't answer everybody's calls and I feel very bad about it. But I'm not a big fan of being with the phone all day and there comes a time when I need to disconnect from my mobile. But I always appreciate all the messages of affection and support. There are a lot of people who have my telephone number and I don''t know how they got it, I don't even know many of them and I can't spend all day catering for people I've no idea where they've sprung from.
 
That picture of where he is sitting on his boat is just WOW! He is a handsome dude! :)
He is a complete package.. a good looking guy, great sportsman and a lovely person. I love reading his interviews that are translated from Spanish because he seems such a fascinating personality as well.

I don't know. Buff.. honestly, I rarely get angry. You know what happens. If I get angry it's usually just for a moment and then it's quickly gone. I really don't like arguing. If it's not absolutely necessary, I try to avoid problems. People say that when there's a problem you have to attack it, and I say that maybe it's better if you can avoid it. Avoid the confrontation, that is.
What a sweet person :)
 
Thank you guys for posting these interviews. They are amazing and give an insight into Nadal's thinking outside of tennis.
It is incredible how sorted he is in life. He has a very calm and philosophical approach which is usually not the case with celebrities. Surely, there's things to learn from Nadal outside of tennis.
 
He is a complete package.. a good looking guy, great sportsman and a lovely person. I love reading his interviews that are translated from Spanish because he seems such a fascinating personality as well.



What a sweet person :)
He really is, isn't he? I get so annoyed with the Fed Fanatics and the Djokovic Delusional Society who have never bothered to read his pressers or translations of interesting articles like this one, who have never gotten the full picture of Rafa because of the language difference, and they post such derogatory garbage about Rafa and malign and insult Rafa fans who try to inform them about who he really is. I usually try and ignore them but sometimes I just can't help myself after reading their constant slobbering and worship of their favourites. Yesterday I was told I was unnecessarily offensive!

Oh well, I'll try to follow Rafa's wise words and just avoid them all. :giggle:
 
"The knee, she is no good from January to April and then she is bery good from April to June, and then maybe she is not so good during July and August, but then she is very no good after September!"- Rafael Nadal
Bro are you on Nole train for RG? We need your support so Nole can protect Fed's record from Nadal. Get on train boy
 
I came across his video of Gypsy with Shakira the other day and watched it for old time's sake. Oh. My. Goodness. :love: I'll bet that went over big too. ;)
Wikipedia says: ¤¤ Upon its release, "Gypsy" received generally positive reviews from music critics, many of whom complimented its production. The single was commercially successful and peaked within the top 10 of the charts of countries including Germany, Hungary, Mexico and Spain. In the United States, "Gypsy" peaked at number 65 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, while "Gitana" reached number six on the Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart. "Gypsy" was certified platinum and gold in Spain and Mexico, respectively.
An accompanying music video for the song was directed by Jaume de Laiguana, and stars Spanish professional tennis player Rafael Nadal as Shakira's love interest. The music video also generated a favourable response from critics, and was praised for the chemistry between Shakira and Nadal. ¤¤
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_(Shakira_song)

The official video has 51,377,613 views on YouTube.
:)
 
When will Rafa ever retire? He said he's playing as long as he can compete for big titles.....
I can't see how he'll ever stop competing for Roland Garros :)
He didn't drop a set at 2017rg, he only dropped one set at 2018rg.
And even if he loses Roland Garros, it'll take a long time before he's not able to 'compete' for it.
I think even in 2015 when his confidence was shot, he would hardly have dropped a set if he didn't play Djokovic.....
And heck, even at his worst slam - the Australian Open - he won 18 sets in a row despite not being able to train properly because of ankle surgery.
It'll take an eternity for Rafa to stop competing for big titles!
 
Last edited:
I love seeing Rafa practice but can’t help thinking he beats his body up too much before he gets to the tournaments.
Impossible for him to beat his body up on clay, its like walking on clouds in heaven for him.....that's why he never has knee problems at Roland Garros or any of the other clay events :)
The only time he had to withdraw from a clay event was the wrist injury in 2016, but no amount of training can beat up his body on clay.
 
Impossible for him to beat his body up on clay, its like walking on clouds in heaven for him.....that's why he never has knee problems at Roland Garros or any of the other clay events :)
The only time he had to withdraw from a clay event was the wrist injury in 2016, but no amount of training can beat up his body on clay.
Hope you're right.
 
Imagine how weird it must feel knowing you are about to be within 2 slams of Federer's record :)
If Federer fails to win Wimbledon this year, Rafa's going to overtake him with French Opens alone, let alone the very real possibility of Rafa winning another Wimbledon or US Open.....and I guess the Australian Open too considering he won 18 sets in a row this year.....
 
Imagine how weird it must feel knowing you are about to be within 2 slams of Federer's record :)
If Federer fails to win Wimbledon this year, Rafa's going to overtake him with French Opens alone, let alone the very real possibility of Rafa winning another Wimbledon or US Open.....and I guess the Australian Open too considering he won 18 sets in a row this year.....
Nadal winning the FO is hardly the guarantee it used to be.
 

DSH

Hall of Fame
Nadal winning the FO is hardly the guarantee it used to be.
12 should be his goal.
At least win 1 of the next 3 RG when he still has real chances of winning there.
While winning the previous titles strengthens the confidence, he should avoid overloading of matches prior to the French Open which, after all, is his main objective each season.
If he manages to win a couple of RG more, his chance to equal Federer would be within reach.
But as always, it will depend on choosing the tournaments well and avoiding the injuries that prevent him, sometimes, reaching the top due to the big titles. (read the Grand Slams).
Then, motivation and confidence in his body to look for the impossible: Federer's record.
He has until the 2021 season to get it.
 
I mean he certainly shouldn't be losing before the QFs but from there on we will see. Playing 6-7 matches in a row seems to be his issue.
He should just ease off the training a bit, go swimming, play golf or something. It's still 2 weeks to go and he's already going hell for leather on court. Moya said he would stop him training too much.
 
Last edited:
Nadal winning the FO is hardly the guarantee it used to be.
LOL, Thiem is 0-9 in sets played vs Rafa at Roland Garros.
Rafa has dropped a total of ONE set in the last 2 years.....Its never been more certain :)
I'm not even sure if Rafa will drop a set in 2021!

12 should be his goal.
At least win 1 of the next 3 RG when he still has real chances of winning there.
While winning the previous titles strengthens the confidence, he should avoid overloading of matches prior to the French Open which, after all, is his main objective each season.
If he manages to win a couple of RG more, his chance to equal Federer would be within reach.
But as always, it will depend on choosing the tournaments well and avoiding the injuries that prevent him, sometimes, reaching the top due to the big titles. (read the Grand Slams).
Then, motivation and confidence in his body to look for the impossible: Federer's record.
He has until the 2021 season to get it.
It is impossible for Federer to keep the record if Federer is done willing slams, that's for certain :)
Rafa gets to 20+ with the French Open alone, and given that he couldn't even train properly at the AO and still won 18 sets in a row......you know Rafa can still win hardcourt slams.
Heck, Rafa is clearly good enough to win Wimbledon too based on last year, and he looks a lot better this year than he did last year.
 
Last edited:
Top