Nadal News 2.0

vernonbc

Legend
Rafa and Mery's wedding was very classy, but it looks like the boys really enjoyed themselves at the reception. :laughing:

[B]Sandy[/B]‏ @[B]nycsandygirl[/B]
Sandy Retweeted SOCIALITÉ
Feli, David & other guests arriving at the hotel last night. They said it was phenomenal, beautiful & stupendous! The guests seem to be carrying a wedding favor but can’t make out what it is. The reporter seems to say it is a hangover remedy.



 

octobrina10

G.O.A.T.
"Tennis Stars in Kazakhstan", an exhibition event

Takes place on October 24, 2019

Rafa will play a charity exhibition match in Nur-Sultan, the capital city of Kazakhstan, this Thursday.

Schedule (local time; UTC/GMT + 6 hours):
12 pm: Press conference
6 pm: Tennis clinic for young tennis players
7 pm: Exhibition match at Barys Arena in Nur-Sultan

Reportedly, the match will be broadcast live on a local TV channel.


 

octobrina10

G.O.A.T.
"Tennis Stars in Kazakhstan", an exhibition event

Takes place on October 24, 2019

Rafa will play a charity exhibition match in Nur-Sultan, the capital city of Kazakhstan, this Thursday.

Schedule (local time; UTC/GMT + 6 hours):
12 pm: Press conference
6 pm: Tennis clinic for young tennis players
7 pm: Exhibition match at Barys Arena in Nur-Sultan

Reportedly, the match will be broadcast live on a local TV channel.


October 23, 2019
Rafa arrived in Nur-Sultan, the capital city of Kazakhstan:


Via ktf.kz iG
http://instagr.am/p/B3-SELzAt76/

:)
 
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octobrina10

G.O.A.T.
"Tennis Stars in Kazakhstan", an exhibition event

Takes place on October 24, 2019

Rafa will play a charity exhibition match in Nur-Sultan, the capital city of Kazakhstan, this Thursday.

Schedule (local time; UTC/GMT + 6 hours):
12 pm: Press conference
6 pm: Tennis clinic for young tennis players
7 pm: Exhibition match at Barys Arena in Nur-Sultan

Reportedly, the match will be broadcast live on a local TV channel.


October 24
Pre-match press conference

Rafa was asked a question about his wedding.
Rafa: "I'm super happy to be here. We enjoyed that beautiful [wedding] day. We had a lot of fun. We enjoyed that day with the people we wanted. We had a great day we had prepared for a long time. But now it's tennis time and I'm happy to share this moment with Novak and benefit the charity. I have to thank Bulat Utemuratov [the president of the Kazakhstan Tennis Federation] for the invitation. Thank you, Novak, for supporting this charity match. It's really nice to be back in this country, it's great to be here. I could not imagine how beautiful this country is until my first visit. I hope this match will attract a lot of interest among the fans, especially among the children."


Via RNKOTFB

:)
 
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octobrina10

G.O.A.T.
"Tennis Stars in Kazakhstan", an exhibition event

Takes place on October 24, 2019

Rafa will play a charity exhibition match in Nur-Sultan, the capital city of Kazakhstan, this Thursday.

Schedule (local time; UTC/GMT + 6 hours):
12 pm: Press conference
6 pm: Tennis clinic for young tennis players
7 pm: Exhibition match at Barys Arena in Nur-Sultan

Reportedly, the match will be broadcast live on a local TV channel.


October 24, 2019
The opening of the new tennis centre in Nur-Sultan

The man in the centre is Bulat Utemuratov, the President of the Kazakhstan Tennis Federation:

Via RNKOTFB

Later, Rafa and Djoko held a tennis clinic for the kids who are cheering in the video:

Click the forward icon to see all the pictures:
http://instagr.am/p/B4BnSUAgZUV/
:)
 
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octobrina10

G.O.A.T.
Rafa Nadal Academy in Manacor
Rafa Nadal Sports Centre in Manacor

The RN Academy is part of the RN Sports Centre

Today, on October 24, Rafa's sports centre hosted a press conference ahead of the 9th annual congress of the What Really Matters
Foundation
(La Fundacion Lo Que De Verdad Importa; LQDVI) that will take place in Palma, the capital of Mallorca, tomorrow.

The LQDVI What Really Matters) Foundation website, excerpts: ¤¤ The Foundation seeks to promote the development and the diffusion of universal human, ethic and moral values to the public fundamentally through the development of cultural activities.

The LQDVI congresses are free, non-political events opened to all beliefs, ideas and opinions, which are held in major Spanish cities with the aim of introducing young people with universal human values (such a tolerance, the overcome of difficulties, respect or solidarity) through the personal accounts given by speakers themselves.

Since 2007, thousands of young people have attended these congresses to listen to impressive life stories that help them reconsider their own priorities and realize what is really important to them in life.

The LQDVI congresses started in 2007, with an event in Madrid, with the attendance of more than 3000 university and High School students. After this first event, many requested us to repeat it. This resulted in congresses that were held in many Spanish cities.

Presently, the congresses are held in eight Spanish cities, including Bilbao, Valencia, Seville, Barcelona, Zaragoza and Palma de Mallorca.
In each city, the Foundation has a Honorary President. Rafa is the Honorary President of the LQDVI Foundation in Palma, the capital of Mallorca.¤¤




(y) to Rafa's sports centre!
 

octobrina10

G.O.A.T.
"Tennis Stars in Kazakhstan", an exhibition event

Takes place on October 24, 2019

Rafa will play a charity exhibition match in Nur-Sultan, the capital city of Kazakhstan, this Thursday.

Schedule (local time; UTC/GMT + 6 hours):
12 pm: Press conference
6 pm: Tennis clinic for young tennis players
7 pm: Exhibition match at Barys Arena in Nur-Sultan

Reportedly, the match will be broadcast live on a local TV channel.


October 24, 2019

Rafa and Djoko met with the President of Kazakhstan Tokayev at his residence:


THE OFFICIAL SITE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF KAZAKHSTAN:

¤¤ Welcoming the famous tennis players at the “Akorda” residence, the Head of State thanked Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic for visiting Kazakhstan and participating in the exhibition match.
“This is a great opportunity to see the game of outstanding players of contemporary tennis playing here in Kazakhstan. The charity aim of this event is extremely important. Your visit to our capital is a sign of international support to our national tennis. I think it will be good example, particularly for our kids to follow your steps, and of course it’s very good that you will be giving some lessons to them by organizing some training courses,” Kassym-Jomart Tokayev said.

Highly appreciating the development of tennis in Kazakhstan, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic expressed gratitude to the President for the opportunity to meet.
“This is my third visit to Kazakhstan. We are excited to be here. I enjoyed every visit to this beautiful capital, but this visit is a special one because I am able to meet you and visit this beautiful Palace “Akorda,” - Rafael Nadal said.

“Thank you, Mr. President, for supporting tennis in Kazakhstan. We are very happy to contribute to the development and promotion of tennis in your country,” Novak Djokovic noted.

Kassym-Jomart Tokayev wished the athletes further success and congratulated Rafael Nadal on his recent marriage.¤¤ :)



 
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octobrina10

G.O.A.T.
"Tennis Stars in Kazakhstan", an exhibition event

Takes place on October 24, 2019

Rafa will play a charity exhibition match in Nur-Sultan, the capital city of Kazakhstan, this Thursday.

October 24, 2019

Rafa and Djoko met with the first president of Kazakhstan at the multifunctional ice palace "Barys Arena", where the played. The capital city of Kazakhstan was renamed Nur-Sultan from Astana after him at the beginning of this year.

:)
 

octobrina10

G.O.A.T.
"Tennis Stars in Kazakhstan", an exhibition event
October 24, 2019
Rafa and Djoko met with the first president of Kazakhstan at the multifunctional ice palace "Barys Arena", where the played. The capital city of Kazakhstan was renamed Nur-Sultan from Astana after him at the beginning of this year.

Among other things, Rafa developed the relationship between Spain and Kazakhstan.

Translated from Russian by Google:
"Before the tennis match, Rafael Nadal conveyed the warm greetings of Spain's former king, Juan Carlos I, to Kazakhstan's ex-president Nursultan Nazarbayev. The ex-president thanked the tennis player and asked Rafael to say 'hello' to his friend."
"At this point, Rafael Nadal called Spain's former king Juan Carlos and handed the phone to the ex-president. Thus, before the charity tennis match, a small telephone conversation took place between the ex-president and Juan Carlos I."
:)
 
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The Blond Blur

Hall of Fame
October 24
Pre-match press conference

Rafa was asked a question about his wedding.
Rafa: "I'm super happy to be here. We enjoyed that beautiful [wedding] day. We had a lot of fun. We enjoyed that day with the people we wanted. We had a great day we had prepared for a long time. But now it's tennis time and I'm happy to share this moment with Novak and benefit the charity. I have to thank Bulat Utemuratov [the president of the Kazakhstan Tennis Federation] for the invitation. Thank you, Novak, for supporting this charity match. It's really nice to be back in this country, it's great to be here. I could not imagine how beautiful this country is until my first visit. I hope this match will attract a lot of interest among the fans, especially among the children."

Fedr punching the air right now :laughing:
 

vernonbc

Legend
Great translation of a terrific interview from Rafa. It shows, again, what an intelligent guy he is. :)

El Mundo 30 aniversario. Tenis
Rafa Nadal: "Más que 'Marca España', me siento ciudadano español, un afortunado por nacer donde he nacido"
https://www.elmundo.es/deportes/tenis/2 ... b458b.html


Rafa Nadal: "I feel I'm a Spanish citizen rather than a 'Made in Spain' brand, I'm lucky to have been born where I was born"

By RAFAEL MOYANO | Friday 25 October 2019 | Translated by nou.amic for www.vamosbrigade.com

On the occasion of EL MUNDO's 30th Anniversary, the best Spanish sportsman of all time speaks about himself, tennis, his future and the situation in Spain and the world.

He is recovering from the wrist injury that forced him to pull out of the Masters 1000 in Shanghai. It was the last tournament he was to have taken part in before his wedding and what he did not then know, at the time of the interview, was that he is going to be back at world number one because Djokovic was beaten at that tournament. We told him that it was a luxury for this newspaper to count on the best Spanish sportsman of all time for this special anniversary edition. He denied that best, because he does not like those rankings, and so we gave him another argument: the number of front covers he has given us in these past 30 years, the millions of clicks on our website his victories have generated.

He said his hand was better, that he was getting back to practising, but that he was up to here with the fuss of advertising promotions... Even so he spoke calmly, securely, and showed an interest in everything that is happening. He wanted to know what the prognosis is for the (Spanish general) elections on 10 November and, above all, for after they are held, and he is concerned about what is happening in Catalonia, although he does not think his opinion contributes much to that matter. He speaks about this, but is more comfortable expressing himself on what he knows about. He gives the feeling that being at home, in the settled environment at the Rafa Nadal Academy in his hometown of Manacor, relaxes him. That said, the times he has been seen to be nervous are also few and far between. His name, Rafael (the only thing I share with him), comes from the Hebrew and means "the medicine of God" and, although he must be one of the few human beings who does not think he is superhuman, the rest of us have been injected with a shot of stimulants by his tennis for years, without a prescription.


# 30 years ago, the Berlin Wall came tumbling down, Felipe Gonzalez led the government in Spain, EL MUNDO first appeared, Rafa Nadal was a 3-year-old kicking a ball around... Have these three decades been good for the planet, for Spain, for Rafa Nadal?

- For Spain, in general, I think so, without any doubt. We've made very important advances and I think we've situated ourselves at an important level on the world map. 30 years ago, we had a much more secondary role. On a world level, there have been good things and bad things. There have been wars, disasters, we still have poverty and, above all, too much of a difference between some regions and others. Obviously, for my part, I have indeed had 30 very good years in all aspects but, of course, I'd go back those 30 years. I'd love to be 3 years old again.

# How do you, who travels all over the world, view the negativity with which many Spaniards talk about their country? Are they unaware of what we have? What do those abroad think of us? Do they speak better of us than we do ourselves?

- It depends on the place. I don't think there's a unanimous opinion. We have a tendency in Spain to think that what's abroad is better than what we have. We do it almost by inertia. In my humble point of view, the truth is that, in the field of politics,we throw so many stones at one another, and so continuously, that we end up thinking we're in a country that's not as good as it really is. Of course, there has been a crisis, of course, there are people who have a bad time. There's no doubt things have to be improved, but we also have to see the good things. Look, for example, at the public health service, it's unbelievably positive. I've been in many countries, in countries we consider superior, and I can assure you they are very far behind us.

We have a state of well-being we have to keep on promoting. To maintain it we have to increase solidarity, avoid some having more than others. We need a strong middle class, as widespread as possible. It's in countries where there are people that live well and people who have very little that problems of delinquency, insecurity, and everything contrary to the well-being of the state appear.

# So, they have a better opinion of Spain than the Spaniards?

- I think so.

# And do you have anything to do with this? Do you feel you're the image of 'Made in Spain' ?

- Basically, I feel I'm a Spanish citizen, rather than a 'Made In Spain' brand, and more than anything else. I'm lucky to have been born where I was born. If we compare Spain with the rest of the world, we're extremely privileged.

# You have never manifested yourself politically, and I don't know if you're going to do it now...

- I don't know whether I will do it sometime, but I'm not going to right now.

# But you do have an opinion on the state of the political instability in Spain, the lack of a Government, the repetition of elections...

- Instability and uncertainty bring problems because this creates doubts in our own Spanish investors and for foreign investment. The country goes into a state of paralysis that's bad for all of us. Economy is always talked about thinking more of businesses, but in fact when big business suffers we all suffer. It's a chain that goes from the highest to the lowest. The people vote so politicians can reach agreement, not for them to fight among themselves. Lately there have been too many times when they've been unable to reach agreement, and that's not anybody's fault yet it is also everybody's fault. The time has come for a little reflection, not to think what is best for one party or what is best for the other. They have to begin to think on what is best for Spain. The political formations that receive most votes need to forget about the past and think of making great political agreements.

# What there is agreement about is you. Is Rafael Nadal the greatest Spanish sportsman of all time?

- If I believed I was, I wouldn't say, but as I don't know, I can't say anything, either. It's not for me to decide on that. I'd be talking nonsense if I said I wasn't among those sportsmen who had stood out in our country's history. That's the truth, it's obvious, but my position among this group of athletes is something for the specialists to decide, those that have the capacity to analyse the history of our sport from the very beginning up until the present day. That said, I know people like rankings, but I don't think they're so necessary. We should enjoy and appreciate everything our sport gives us, because we've had many years of great success. We should value this because it's not going to last for ever.

# One of the great satisfactions we've had (at EL MUNDO) over the past 30 years, in the newspaper and on our web, has been being able to report the success of Spanish sport and its victories. Yours, especially. You don't know how difficult it is at times to write a headline for your latest wins or choose a front cover photo for the latest Roland Garros. We have literally run out of words. How do you view the evolution of Spanish sport over these three decades in which you have played such a stellar part?

- Obviously, there has been an unbelievable boom. The 1992 Olympic Games (in Barcelona) were a great success for our country and an important point of departure. We've experienced things that seemed impossible and unbelievable years ago. As a spectator, because first of all, although I'm a sportsman, I'm a great fan of sport in general, I've been able to and continue to be able to enjoy all the things my companions have done. About the future? There's only one reality here, for Spain to continue at the very top level in sport it must have support, it has to be invested in and promoted.

...2/
 

vernonbc

Legend
/2...

# And tennis? Is there tennis after Nadal?

- There are few players coming through. For the past 30 years, consecutively and without a stop, tennis players of the highest level have kept appearing. After my generation, in which I include Roberto Bautista and Pablo Carreño, we have a pretty large vacuum. We are waiting to see how Jaume Munar and Carlos Alcarez, a very young guy who is said to be very good, evolve. We shouldn't make the mistake of thinking that what we've achieved in recent years will be typical, because we will be in for a great deal of disappointment.

# Sergio Ramos has said he wants to be in the Tokyo Olympics. It will be an image for posterity to see Ramos, Pau Gasol and Rafa Nadal together at the inauguration ceremony.

- I always dreamed of going to the Olympics and I have been able to. They're always a very special experience for me, with an intensity and enthusiasm it's difficult to describe. I'd love to be able to go to Tokyo. I hope my physical shape will let me.

# Vamos, Rafa! ... Where does Rafa go next from here?

- Well, I always go for the daily work. I'm convinced that it's with daily everyday work that things that people afterwards value and rave about are achieved. I almost never lose this perspective. I'm now trying to recover from this slight problem in my hand. I'm starting to practise, little by little, with enthusiasm, to try to end the year in the best way possible.That's what I think about right now. Then, we'll plan the beginning of next year. The every day work.

# I'm one of those who thought, with great vision for the future: 'Ugh! Rafa's tennis is very physical, I don't know how long he'll last!' Explain to all of us smart-alecks you have proven wrong on the tennis court how somebody, after so many years playing with such success, corrects a stroke, intensifies his movements, perfects his serve...

- It's normal to think that about being physical.

# I used to think that. I just said you've proved us wrong on court.

- But it's a logical way to think. I didn't imagine I'd be where I am at 33, either. I go back to insisting on the daily work, on not setting myself mental limits nor time limits with a date. I keep on playing, enjoying what I do. I'm really satisfied with the way I've always managed to maintain my enthusiasm, after so many difficult moments with physical problems. That's what really gives me satisfaction. About the change in my game, I don't think it's been drastic. When you're willing to improve, when you're willing to find solutions, your game is in constant evolution. When you're a competitor you always look for the way to continue being competitive. For many years, very many, I've had to keep looking for solutions to the problems my physical condition kept presenting me with. I had to adapt my training sessions to the problems I kept having, with sufficiently good people by my side to be able to do this. Plus, I have a great capacity for improvement and, above all, for work to accept the challenge of change. The key is not in wanting to change, the key is to accept the challenge of change. To change, first you have to fail, and the challenge is the acceptance of that process. In conclusion, not to become frustrated by your errors. I've borne that well, more or less always, and that's why my tennis evolves.

# As you're talking about improvement and effort, in one conference he gave, your uncle Toni, a great expert in motivation techniques and your lifelong coach until recently, highlighted resilience as his nephew Rafael's greatest virtue. How many times have you had to fall and get back up again?

- I've had many physical problems, but also the luck that I've always won when I came back. Besides, I've got injured when I've just come from having many wins and had sufficiently high points not to slip down the ranking. I haven't been out of the top ten for an awfully long time and I only ended the year outside the top five in 2016, when practically everything happened to me.

# I've heard you say that more is learned from wins than losses.

- There's an explanation for this phrase, people may not understand it. Much more is learned from wins, first, if you are able to be really self critical and, second, if you have the humility to understand that although you've won, there are things you don't do well. If you don't have that capacity, obviously you'll learn much more by losing, because when you lose, you realise there's somebody who does it better than you, it's pure logic. But if you have the capacity not to resign yourself, not to think you're too good, not to let victory blur your true vision, it's much easier to learn by winning, because the confidence of winning enables you to be able to try things, feel less pressure, less anxiety. Winning gives you an interior state that allows you to assimilate much better and accept the changes you want to make to your game. We are on our way to improving.

# You speak of much work and effort. How many times have you not felt like picking up your racquet to go and practise?

- Sincerely, only when I have so many physical problems that I can't enjoy it. When it's really hard to bear. But always when I'm more or less physically fine - that's not saying I'm very well -, when I can play without excessive physical limitations, I always feel like practising.

# Motivation. What part of the success of a top level player can be put down to a sports psychologist?

- I can't tell you because I've never had one. It is true I've had people at my side who are vital in my career, from my family to all the professionals that have helped me. I've had the capacity to listen and to let them tell me the things I do wrong. When they are way up there at the top, people sometimes tend not to want to listen to bad things. I'm no exception. But I've kept almost the same team all my life because I've given them liberty to tell me things as they really see them. And, of course, having an uncle like Toni close to me until two years ago has been of key importance.

# The same team, the same make of racquet, the same sponsor.... The most talked-of surprise news was the incorporation of Carlos Moya as your coach. What importance has he had in this continuity of your career?

- He arrived at a moment when I was in a recuperation phase and he helped me decisively in consolidating it. Although things were going very well, as they always have for me with my uncle, he brought different forms of working, different exercises, with a new and fresh discourse which at this moment helped me to continue making steps forward.

# Competition, competitiveness. Has it been good or bad that your career has run so parallel to those of Federer and Djokovic, that generational coincidence of three of the greatest?

- It hasn't been positive for the number of (tournament) wins to have coincided with them. But of course it has when it comes to the level of personal exigency. When you have clear references in front of you evolution is easier and it's easier to understand the path you need to take to achieve success. We are the players who have won most Grand Slams, up until now, and we've coincided in the same epoch. It is a singular and unique epoch, and it's a great satisfaction to me to be part of it.

# How much of a burden to you is it to be an example to almost everybody and of almost everything, both on and off court?

- I say this with my hand on my heart: I try, and I think I manage, not to live with it. I try to live my life in a natural way, in a normal way. I can't spend all day thinking whether I am like that or not. I don't do it. I try to do the things that make me happy, to be a polite person. I think I am, although everybody thinks they are from their point of view. I usually behave correctly on court and off it. I don't feel the burden of having to be an example. I am as I am, aware I can't be to everyone's liking, but it is also a great satisfaction to feel the love of so many people for so many years, all over the world and especially here in Spain.

...3/
 

vernonbc

Legend
/3...

# It is exactly a year since the San Llorenç floods and the image of you that went round the world with your sleeves rolled up and lending a hand. There are those who said it was all done for the photo. What's the difference between joining in to help and feeling sympathetic?

- There's a great difference. Wanting to give an image of helping is one thing and actually doing it another. There are people that try to get the most out of mediatic attention for the things they do. That's not my case. What we do through the Rafa Nadal Foundation doesn't always have the repercussion it may deserve, and it's my fault. I've never wanted my foundation to look like a publicity setting to improve my public image, because it seems to me like a lack of respect for what the Foundation is in itself. That about San Llorenç was truly awful. Firstly, there's a tendency to speak without beimg informed and, secondly, I don't gain anything by going to have my photo taken. I'm lucky to have a sufficiently good image. I feel loved wherever I go. All of my mother's family is from that small town, which is here, five kilometres from Manacor. My aunts, my cousins are from there. All I did was go to see what had happened and try to help, as all my friends did. I simply collected some overalls from the maintenance guys at the Academy, loaned them to a few of my friends and we went to help. Nothing else.

# I suppose that's the price you have to pay for being famous.

- I accept that I'm famous. The only thing I find harder to accept is people's lack of sensitivity. Just because you're famous why do you have to be open to them being able to say anything about you? If I give my opinion of another person I try to have informed myself about them first and, if not, I keep quiet.

# You were also born on the Mediterranean, which a recent study indicates is the sea most affected by global warming. You're about to get married and this is a question we ask ourselves when we're planning on having children. What do you think of the planet we're leaving for them?

- I don't like to give my opinion on things I don't know for certain, but it's obvious that the human being is harming the planet. That's a reality that can't be brushed aside. I'm a documentary enthusiast and there are many that talk about what we are causing. We have to examine our conscience, first on a personal level and, above all, on a global level. Our children may go on living on a planet in a good state, but I don't dare any more to speak about what may be left for my children's children. We have to find a remedy while we still have time.. and I think we are still in time.


Nadal, not just numbers
Since at the age of 15 he became the youngest player to win an ATP tournament, he has won 12 Roland Garros, 4 US Opens, 2 Wimbledons and 1 Australian Open. Only Federer, with 1 more, has won more Grand Slams. As well as being the player who has won most Masters 1000, with 35, he has won 4 Davis Cups with Spain and 2 Olympic gold medals. He has played 277 tournaments, reached the final on 121 occasions and won 84 of them. He has won 967 and lost 196 of the 1163 official matches he has played. He has reached year end as world number one on 4 occasions - this year he will have to fight it out with Djokovic - and on another 6 occasions he has finished the year as world number two. On top of that, he leaves a good impression.
 

MichaelNadal

Bionic Poster
Nadal makes life so much more exciting :D can't believe how much epicness he's given me over the years and he's still out there beasting in practice (not even a week after his wedding no less, having already played a match yesterday) like it's 2006.
Great translation of a terrific interview from Rafa. It shows, again, what an intelligent guy he is. :)

"His name, Rafael (the only thing I share with him), comes from the Hebrew and means "the medicine of God"
See, Epic :D
 
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