Nadal News 2.0

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru
Iga on Rafa:
Q. Many times you have said you're a big fan of Rafa Nadal. Have you ever talked to him about defending the trophy in Paris? Have you ever consulted with him about any tennis question?

IGA SWIATEK: No, not yet. Maybe we're gonna have a chance to do that later, but we just had like a quick small talk last year, and yesterday he said hi to me. For now I'm too overwhelmed to even say hi. So, you know, I'm a big fan of his, and if I'm gonna have a chance to, you know, ask him some stuff and also learn from him, it would be great, but we are both busy, so I know it's gonna be hard to schedule that.

But, yeah, we're gonna see.

Q. My question was actually about Rafa, as well. You're turning 20 on Monday, I believe. I think he celebrates his birthday during Roland Garros, as well. There was the coincidence of you guys saving match points in Rome and winning that title. Your fandom of him, have you ever thought about these things, about the kind of weird connections that you guys have or don't have?

IGA SWIATEK: Well, I thought about it, but I also think it's kind of weird. I don't know. I don't know what to say, because it's also some kind of superstition when you look at that stuff and try to compare each other.

But, yeah, I know it's weird (smiling).
Rafa and Iga Swiatek chatted today on a practice court:


:)
 

vernonbc

Legend
Nice write-up. (y)

NADAL CHASING FURTHER HISTORY IN PARIS

Spaniard could take sole possession of the men's all-time record of most Grand Slams won with victory this fortnight


As Rafael Nadal ticked the century mark in Paris by winning a record 13th title on the terre battue last autumn, his 100th win at his favourite stomping grounds was capped when he swept his biggest rival Novak Djokovic in the 2020 final.

It was a coronation derived from a crisis.

Nadal had entered Roland-Garros undercooked and lacking confidence, his expectations perhaps as low as they’d ever been at the start of a Paris fortnight. But there he was at the podium two weeks later, a teardrop running the contour of his masked face as he sank his teeth into the Coupe des Mousquetaires.

“Doubts are part of the life,” the Mallorcan would later reflect. “For me doubts are good because they mean that you don't consider yourself too good.

“Honestly, one month and a half ago if you tell me you're going to have this trophy with you again, I will say: ‘This year will probably be too difficult.’”

Difficult - like impossible - is not enough to stop Nadal from storming the gates of Roland-Garros history, year after year.

Back in Paris just eight months later, confidence at full throttle after earning two titles on clay this spring, it’s hard to imagine anything derailing the Spaniard as he aims for the - previously - unthinkable - a 14th Roland-Garros title and a 21st major crown.

“We all know Rafa is the huge favourite,” two-time champion and Tennis Channel analyst Jim Courier said in a conference call this week. “Rafa has every right to be the most optimistic of all - even though he'll doubt it more than anybody, ironically.”

No matter the conditions, the backdrop or the level of competition, there’s never any question about Nadal’s supremacy on clay, especially at his personal proving ground in Paris.

“In my opinion, to play Rafa here on the Chatrier court, it's still the toughest challenge,” two-time Roland-Garros finalist Dominic Thiem told reporters on Friday.

Thiem, a massive sports fan himself, admits he’s never seen anything quite like the King of Clay rampaging inside of Court Philippe-Chatrier.

“I guess also outside of tennis, it's probably one of the most difficult things ever, in sports in general, to beat him here on this court. His 102 matches are incredible, and one of the biggest achievements ever in sport.”

His biggest rival sees it similarly. Top-seeded Djokovic, the 2016 Roland-Garros champion, has had more success than any player against Nadal on clay, and hopes to challenge him this year for the title, but after falling to Nadal in last year’s final, he could only praise the Spaniard.

“No holding him back it seems like. It's amazing,” he said in Paris last autumn. “I mean, he lost two times in his entire career. Winning 13 times, there's not much you can say. All the superlatives you can use, he deserves them.”

Nadal, who won the title without dropping a set for the fourth time last year, will open his campaign against world No.62 Alexei Popyrin of Australia.

Drawn into Djokovic’s half of the draw, the No.3 seed is slated to face Andrey Rublev in the quarter-finals, followed by the top-ranked Serbian in the semis, if the seeds hold.

“I need to be ready for it,” Nadal said of his opening round.

Winning what would be an all-time record 21st Grand Slam men's singles title (he and Federer are currently tied atop the men's leaderboard with 20 each) shapes up as a difficult task for a man who will turn 35 next week, but Nadal has a way of turning potential pitfalls into crowning achievements in Paris.

“I need to keep practicing the next couple of days, try to be in the best shape possible for the beginning," he said. "But I know every round is tough, I respect every opponent always.”[/QUOTE]

https://www.rolandgarros.com/en-us/arti ... ris-rg2021
 

JustMy2Cents

Professional
Paris is Raphael's house
Since he won his first trophy in 2005, we have felt nothing but growing affection year after year, ending with open admiration as he has broken records.

TONI NADAL
MAY 30, 2021 - 10:40 CEST

The impression that Paris has made on me since I first came here in 1976, on my study trip, has remained practically unchanged. In those years, we Spaniards openly admired that more modern and sensitive society that we aspired to emulate and, nevertheless, in a short time we began to assert indisputably that the French are envious of us and that our sporting successes take very badly.
Since Rafael won his first Roland Garros in 2005, being a debutant in the French Grand Slam, we have felt (I by extension, of course) nothing but expectation and a warm welcome towards the young Spanish tennis player, a growing affection year after year and title after title, to end with open admiration as Rafael has been breaking records and adding his 13 majors on the clay of Paris to date
It is true that we lived an unpleasant experience when a large part of the public applauded my nephew's defeat against Robin Soderling, in 2009, as well as the mistake of the French Minister Roselyne Bachelot who accused him, without any proof, of doping five years ago . But it is also true that both events have remained today as something anecdotal and corrected by the immense and repeated displays of esteem and respect.

The tournament director, Guy Forget, and his entire team have always showered us with attentions and celebrated his birthday every June 3 as if it were a child. The sports press and the general press have dedicated many covers and reports full of praise to him throughout all these years.

The French institutions have awarded him several prestigious recognitions, such as the Grand Prize of the Sports Academy, in a ceremony held at the National Assembly in 2009, or the key to Paris that the mayor Anne Hidalgo gave him, after a vote that the City Council resolved unanimously.

In 2017, when Rafael lifted his tenth cup at Roland Garros, I excitedly attended, like all of our family, the biggest standing ovation I have ever seen in a tennis stadium. And this year, as soon as he arrived at the Bois de Boulogne facilities, Rafael has discovered an impressive 800-kilo sculpture, made of steel by the Spanish artist Jordi Díez Fernández , as a tribute and recognition of his sporting achievements.

The sculpture fits perfectly into the new Stade de Roland Garros, which has undergone a comprehensive reform that, without sacrificing an iota of elegance, has replaced the traditional coquetry with a more impersonal magnificence, but more in keeping with the new times. . And it distills what, in my opinion, has been giving the French to Rafael over the years: his strength, his passion, his struggle and his commitment.

Some virtues that Rafael continues to maintain and that, together with the fact that he has lifted the recent tournaments in Barcelona and Rome, and that he has beaten players of the stature of Novak Djokovic , Alexander Zverev or Stefanos Tsitsipas , fill me with hope of see him win his fourteenth trophy at the Philippe Chatrier, too. In his own home and among his own people
 

vernonbc

Legend
Another great interview from Rafael Plaza. I think Plaza knows Charly so well for so many years, he knows how to get him to talk casually and unusually honestly. Some very interesting tidbits in the article. :)

Moya Exclusive: Rafa’s Rome Win Over Shapo Was Turning Point

Jun012021
Rafael Plaza


As Rafael Nadal’s opener at Roland Garros approaches, he is fully prepared to launch a new assault on the La Coupe des Mousquetaires. That is how former World No. 1 Carlos Moya put it in an interview with ATPTour.com in the build-up to Nadal’s first-round match against Alexei Popyrin.
Moya is well aware of the route they have taken to get here, as Nadal has endured a spring European clay swing that has proved tough from the outset.

How is Rafa?
He’s doing very well coming in. We’ve combined matches with more specific training sessions, as we almost always do. His preparation has been good, but [the Internazionali BNL d’Italia in] Rome was a turning point, above all the match with Denis Shapovalov.

Why?
Because until then he’d had doubts, good days and bad days, insecurities... When he won, he took a step forward and found the consistency he was looking for. I’m sure that we will still see more from Rafa, which he is showing in training. Now it’s a question of playing that level in competition.

Did things click when he beat Shapovalov?
He had prepared very well for the clay swing and the match against Andrey Rublev [at the Rolex Monte-Carlo Masters] caught us a little off guard. Not because of the defeat, but the way he played. That match affected him quite a lot, even though later he managed to keep winning. We didn’t see the same Nadal as before that day, in competition or training. However, the opportunity to keep winning and for things to click came up, although you never know why. He came through adversity against Shapovalov [in Rome] and immediately afterwards had a very tough match against [Alexander] Zverev, who had just beaten him in Madrid [at the Mutua Madrid Open], and he was able to play very well. From there he picked up confidence and made the most of it. He played very good tennis in the final with [Novak] Djokovic, but he is capable of playing better.

How do you explain the defeat to Rublev in Monte Carlo if he was so well prepared for the clay swing?
He hadn’t competed for a while, since Australia. In training he had played good players and he got through his two matches in the tournament without any issues. But then came the first time he faced adversity and... I think it’s similar to what happened to him in Rome last year against Schwartzman.

Can you elaborate?
He hadn’t played for many months. He was playing well coming into the tournament and he failed at the first opportunity in which he had to compete, because things weren’t going as he expected. In Monte-Carlo, it was kind of the same thing, although less explicable. He started the match [against Rublev] with five double faults in the first two games, something I’d never seen him do. Above all because of the way he did it. He’s human and that generates doubt. We’ve tried to treat it as an accident and not a habit. Two years ago, when he lost to [Fabio] Fognini in Monte-Carlo and [Dominic] Thiem in Barcelona [at the Barcelona Open Banc Sabadell] it was a very different situation to this. But it was longer than we expected. I’m not talking about winning or losing, I’m talking about feeling comfortable and dominating.

Is there much difference in form between the wins in Barcelona and Rome?
He won in Barcelona without playing brilliantly, far from his best. Also, those of us that are used to seeing Rafa play every day know that he can play better. The demands are always very high with him. There are times that he wins matches whatever happens, for example against [Stefanos] Tsitsipas in Barcelona or against Shapovalov in Rome. But other times that doesn’t happen, like the day against Rublev in Monte-Carlo or against Zverev in Madrid. We think he has progressed mentally and has the stability to play well every day. Until now we weren’t confident that he could do that.

The French Open are allowing players to go out for one hour a day this year, what will he do with that time?
We still haven’t left the hotel, neither of us. We’ll go for a few walks, but we’ll be very careful. We try to minimise any kind of risk as far as possible. We read, watch [box] series, eat dinner together in the room... We pass the time and enjoy ourselves. We get on well, honestly.

What have you been working on before his opener?
We’re fine-tuning things that haven’t been working. In recent weeks, we’ve been trying to hit the ball deep, so the opponent isn’t able to get too far up the court. So if they hit a winner it has to be a risky one. Also, [we are] making more changes with the forehand down the line, changing the backhand more towards cross-court and continuing to focus on the serve, which has improved since Monte-Carlo. There’s no such thing as perfection in tennis, even the greats fail and make mistakes. So there’s always room for improvement.

How many times have you talked about the 21 Grand Slam titles?
None.

Nadal is a player who is used to dealing with pressure, but is there even more in this situation?
Undoubtedly, yes, but there’s always a lot of pressure at the French Open. It’s true that now it’s on a lot of people’s minds, the public and journalists. He is in a position where he could become the player with the most Grand Slam titles, but we try to normalise it, to play it down. And we do that by not talking about it, even though he knows it’s there. Indeed, Rafa is very good at handling pressure.

In the debate over who is the greatest player in history, are Grand Slam titles a definitive argument?
It’s a number of things, but I’m not interested in this debate right now. We have to wait for the three players involved to finish their careers, and then we can analyse it. It’s clear that having more majors than the other player is significant, but we’re a little bored by the subject. We’re the ones that talk about it the least.

What is his biggest danger in Roland Garros?
There’s always danger. We try not to look beyond the next match. It may be a cliché, but it’s true. At the end of the day, you don’t have to be better than 127 players, you have to be better than seven. He’s arrived as we wanted, having won in Rome, healthy and confident. The extra week before the French Open has been positive for himm because he’s been able to rest and right now he is more prepared for all the battles he may face.

How important was beating Djokovic in the final in Rome?
It helped, that much is clear. He’s not the same mentally. These two players come out of each victory between them stronger. It’s also true that Rafa hasn’t lost to Djokovic on clay for six years, since 2015 I believe. Anyway, it doesn’t change much.

Tell me three players you’ll have your eyes on this fortnight.
Djokovic and Tsitsipas, and Casper Ruud could come into the equation. We’ll have to see how he manages the possibility of going far, and I’m talking really far. With his draw and his game, he could do that. Then there’s Zverev, Rublev... I can’t just pick three. Karatsev, for example, he surprised me a lot the other day. I’d seen him on TV, but we trained with him on the centre court, and I was very impressed.

You also trained with Musetti.
He’s a talent. He’ll have to be taken into account in the future, no doubt. He’s still young, but he has a very good future. He’s very different to [Jannik] Sinner, nothing like him. He’s more of an artist, the other a machine, with a very fast rhythm. Sinner is very cold, very calculated, in a good way. That’s the impression I get. Musetti is more temperamental, more inventive. They’re very different players, but I’m sure they’ll play in Grand Slam finals in the future.

 

intrepidish

Professional
Another great interview from Rafael Plaza. I think Plaza knows Charly so well for so many years, he knows how to get him to talk casually and unusually honestly. Some very interesting tidbits in the article. :)

Moya Exclusive: Rafa’s Rome Win Over Shapo Was Turning Point

Jun012021
Rafael Plaza


As Rafael Nadal’s opener at Roland Garros approaches, he is fully prepared to launch a new assault on the La Coupe des Mousquetaires. That is how former World No. 1 Carlos Moya put it in an interview with ATPTour.com in the build-up to Nadal’s first-round match against Alexei Popyrin.
Moya is well aware of the route they have taken to get here, as Nadal has endured a spring European clay swing that has proved tough from the outset.

How is Rafa?
He’s doing very well coming in. We’ve combined matches with more specific training sessions, as we almost always do. His preparation has been good, but [the Internazionali BNL d’Italia in] Rome was a turning point, above all the match with Denis Shapovalov.

Why?
Because until then he’d had doubts, good days and bad days, insecurities... When he won, he took a step forward and found the consistency he was looking for. I’m sure that we will still see more from Rafa, which he is showing in training. Now it’s a question of playing that level in competition.

Did things click when he beat Shapovalov?
He had prepared very well for the clay swing and the match against Andrey Rublev [at the Rolex Monte-Carlo Masters] caught us a little off guard. Not because of the defeat, but the way he played. That match affected him quite a lot, even though later he managed to keep winning. We didn’t see the same Nadal as before that day, in competition or training. However, the opportunity to keep winning and for things to click came up, although you never know why. He came through adversity against Shapovalov [in Rome] and immediately afterwards had a very tough match against [Alexander] Zverev, who had just beaten him in Madrid [at the Mutua Madrid Open], and he was able to play very well. From there he picked up confidence and made the most of it. He played very good tennis in the final with [Novak] Djokovic, but he is capable of playing better.

How do you explain the defeat to Rublev in Monte Carlo if he was so well prepared for the clay swing?
He hadn’t competed for a while, since Australia. In training he had played good players and he got through his two matches in the tournament without any issues. But then came the first time he faced adversity and... I think it’s similar to what happened to him in Rome last year against Schwartzman.

Can you elaborate?
He hadn’t played for many months. He was playing well coming into the tournament and he failed at the first opportunity in which he had to compete, because things weren’t going as he expected. In Monte-Carlo, it was kind of the same thing, although less explicable. He started the match [against Rublev] with five double faults in the first two games, something I’d never seen him do. Above all because of the way he did it. He’s human and that generates doubt. We’ve tried to treat it as an accident and not a habit. Two years ago, when he lost to [Fabio] Fognini in Monte-Carlo and [Dominic] Thiem in Barcelona [at the Barcelona Open Banc Sabadell] it was a very different situation to this. But it was longer than we expected. I’m not talking about winning or losing, I’m talking about feeling comfortable and dominating.

Is there much difference in form between the wins in Barcelona and Rome?
He won in Barcelona without playing brilliantly, far from his best. Also, those of us that are used to seeing Rafa play every day know that he can play better. The demands are always very high with him. There are times that he wins matches whatever happens, for example against [Stefanos] Tsitsipas in Barcelona or against Shapovalov in Rome. But other times that doesn’t happen, like the day against Rublev in Monte-Carlo or against Zverev in Madrid. We think he has progressed mentally and has the stability to play well every day. Until now we weren’t confident that he could do that.

The French Open are allowing players to go out for one hour a day this year, what will he do with that time?
We still haven’t left the hotel, neither of us. We’ll go for a few walks, but we’ll be very careful. We try to minimise any kind of risk as far as possible. We read, watch [box] series, eat dinner together in the room... We pass the time and enjoy ourselves. We get on well, honestly.

What have you been working on before his opener?
We’re fine-tuning things that haven’t been working. In recent weeks, we’ve been trying to hit the ball deep, so the opponent isn’t able to get too far up the court. So if they hit a winner it has to be a risky one. Also, [we are] making more changes with the forehand down the line, changing the backhand more towards cross-court and continuing to focus on the serve, which has improved since Monte-Carlo. There’s no such thing as perfection in tennis, even the greats fail and make mistakes. So there’s always room for improvement.

How many times have you talked about the 21 Grand Slam titles?
None.

Nadal is a player who is used to dealing with pressure, but is there even more in this situation?
Undoubtedly, yes, but there’s always a lot of pressure at the French Open. It’s true that now it’s on a lot of people’s minds, the public and journalists. He is in a position where he could become the player with the most Grand Slam titles, but we try to normalise it, to play it down. And we do that by not talking about it, even though he knows it’s there. Indeed, Rafa is very good at handling pressure.

In the debate over who is the greatest player in history, are Grand Slam titles a definitive argument?
It’s a number of things, but I’m not interested in this debate right now. We have to wait for the three players involved to finish their careers, and then we can analyse it. It’s clear that having more majors than the other player is significant, but we’re a little bored by the subject. We’re the ones that talk about it the least.

What is his biggest danger in Roland Garros?
There’s always danger. We try not to look beyond the next match. It may be a cliché, but it’s true. At the end of the day, you don’t have to be better than 127 players, you have to be better than seven. He’s arrived as we wanted, having won in Rome, healthy and confident. The extra week before the French Open has been positive for himm because he’s been able to rest and right now he is more prepared for all the battles he may face.

How important was beating Djokovic in the final in Rome?
It helped, that much is clear. He’s not the same mentally. These two players come out of each victory between them stronger. It’s also true that Rafa hasn’t lost to Djokovic on clay for six years, since 2015 I believe. Anyway, it doesn’t change much.

Tell me three players you’ll have your eyes on this fortnight.
Djokovic and Tsitsipas, and Casper Ruud could come into the equation. We’ll have to see how he manages the possibility of going far, and I’m talking really far. With his draw and his game, he could do that. Then there’s Zverev, Rublev... I can’t just pick three. Karatsev, for example, he surprised me a lot the other day. I’d seen him on TV, but we trained with him on the centre court, and I was very impressed.

You also trained with Musetti.
He’s a talent. He’ll have to be taken into account in the future, no doubt. He’s still young, but he has a very good future. He’s very different to [Jannik] Sinner, nothing like him. He’s more of an artist, the other a machine, with a very fast rhythm. Sinner is very cold, very calculated, in a good way. That’s the impression I get. Musetti is more temperamental, more inventive. They’re very different players, but I’m sure they’ll play in Grand Slam finals in the future.


Plaza is the journalist Nadal and his team know and trust the most. They've said it many times and it shows. I always read Plaza's work for El Espanol, a newspaper I don't particularly care for outside of its tennis coverage but Plaza always has great pieces there.

Any fan of Nadal who doesn't check that paper after every match to see what Plaza has to say, should really start doing so immediately (even if you have to use a translation engine to do so).



 
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octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru
Plaza is the journalist Nadal and his team know and trust the most. They've said it many times and it shows. I always read Plaza's work for El Espanol, a newspaper I don't particularly care for outside of its tennis coverage but Plaza always has great pieces there.

Any fan of Nadal who doesn't check that paper after every match to see what Plaza has to say, should really start doing so immediately (even if you have to use a translation engine to do so).



I have read a lot of Rafael Plaza's articles about Rafa and his team. He has also written many articles for the Spanish language section of the ATP website. I have liked all his articles I've read. (I use machine translation.)
 
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intrepidish

Professional
I have read a lot of Rafael Plaza's articles about Rafa and his team. He has also written many articles for the Spanish language section of the ATP website. I have liked all his articles I've read. (I use machine translation.)

Sometimes those Plaza pieces published on the ATP site actually come from the El Español newspaper but he writes much more than those.

He also usually does the Nadal match write ups as well which are just about the only write ups with actual insight into what happened and give some sense of what Nadal or Moya feels etc.
 
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