Nadal News 2.0

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru

Interview

February 14, 2024

Genny SS, who listened to Rafa’s interview on Wednesday night, tweeted:

- “Rafa has breakfast with his son every day.
1f970.svg
"

- “Mery supports Rafa going on playing tennis. She likes the idea of him still on tour and sharing the experience with their son.”

A couple more tweets from Genny SS:

- "Rafa wanted to arrive in the clay season with a good amount of match play in his pocket... The injury in Brisbane, thus skipping AO and now having to delay his return by skipping Doha, makes that goal more difficult."

- "In his interview with COPE radio Rafa's said the discomfort he's had recently isn't the same as in Brisbane. Not playing Doha has also to do with not being able to prepare for it properly. Unlike what happened when preparing for Brisbane,now he's not been able to play practice sets yet."

Let's keep hope alive. Vamos Rafa!
...
...
 

Rattie

Legend
Rafa wanted to arrive in the clay season with a good amount of match play in his pocket... The injury in Brisbane, thus skipping AO and now having to delay his return by skipping Doha, makes that goal more difficult.

From Genny_ss on Twitter/X whose account is protected
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru

Interview

February 14, 2024

Genny SS, who listened to Rafa’s interview on Wednesday night, tweeted:

- “Rafa has breakfast with his son every day.
1f970.svg
"

- “Mery supports Rafa going on playing tennis. She likes the idea of him still on tour and sharing the experience with their son.”
Rafa's full interview with COPE, a Spanish radio station, on Wednesday (in Spanish):


Vamos Rafa!

@aldeayeah
...
...
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru
holy crap that's a 38 minute interview

i'll try to give you some headlines later today but there's no way i'm translating the whole thing
I didn't mean you should translate the video, I just posted it for people who understand the language. :)

But speaking of translating, COPE also posted an article about the interview and I read it via Google Translate, but I felt that there were translation errors. It would be great, if you could do a machine translation & correct the errors of the part titled “El polémico contrato con Arabia Saudí” (until the part titled “El fichaje de Mbappé …”):

:)
...
 

ElChivoEspañol

Hall of Fame
Rafa very eloquently laid out his rationale for wanting to work with SA to promote sport and his values in order to facilitate the further opening up of the country to Western values.

In summary, he said that the type of societal change that people, and Western media childishly want to take place overnight, takes time and to judge his work in a few years if and when the country progresses to a more free society.

He said that if the change he hopes takes place then his job would've been complete and if it doesn't he will be the first to admit he was wrong in hoping so.
 

aldeayeah

G.O.A.T.
But speaking of translating, COPE also posted an article about the interview and I read it via Google Translate, but I felt that there were translation errors. It would be great, if you could do a machine translation & correct the errors of the part titled “El polémico contrato con Arabia Saudí” (until the part titled “El fichaje de Mbappé …”):

:)
...
I'll give it a try. I'll paraphrase the original text trying to get across what I think is the right intent, will add some extra notes in brackets [like this]:


INTERVIEWER: Your agreement with Saudi Arabia has been highly controversial...

NADAL: I believe in [societal] progress. I knew I would be heavily criticized, I had assumed that. My actions follow my beliefs, but when I made the choice to accept this challenge, I was aware that it would raise criticism. With situations like this, regardless of how well you justify your actions, there will be people who will see it as purely a bad thing, because that's what they want to see. The reason I went with it was that it aligns with my own personal goals—I'm at the tail end of my career as a player, and my future work will be highly focused on education and sports, which I firmly believe can change the world.

What I see in Saudi Arabia is a willingness to progress. I'm well-informed about all the disagreeable things that have happened and are still happening there, but they do want to open up and enact real progress. 70% of their population is under 35 years old, and these young people are the ones yearning for a change—that's what makes it real. But change can't happen overnight, it's a process, and Arabia is now in the middle of that process, which I believe will make things take a turn for the better.

Maybe I'm wrong and that will end up not happening, but right now I want to contribute to that change, to make sport more ingrained in the country, to make it normal for men and women to learn tennis on equal terms, and the impression I get is that they are on board with this. I don't think public image [sportswashing] is the reason why they reached out to me. I could ignore their call, or accept the challenge. I chose the latter. I'm calm [or "my conscience is clear"] about the reasons I'm doing this, even if that change doesn't materialize and I'm unable to become a positive influence for Arabian people to achieve equality through sport... [the quote cuts off here]

INTERVIEWER (paraphrased): What if there's a homosexual player?

NADAL: That will never be a problem for my academy—but of course, I can't answer for the rest of the country. Right now that situation can be problematic, but my intention is that it stops being so at some point. Things can't change overnight—my hope is that in six, eight or ten years nobody will need to worry about this, and that our presence can help with that. I'll be disappointed if that's not the case.

INTERVIEWER: Have you felt hurt by the criticism?

NADAL: I haven't seen almost any of it, for the sake of my mental health. I'm not one to hold a grudge or seek conflict. If I go out of my way to read the criticism, some of which may be way out of line, I will feel hurt, but especially for the people around me, for my family. I don't know if they have felt hurt—we haven't talked about it—but I'm sure they'd feel hurt about some of the things that people might say. I don't read them because I don't want to be left with a grudge. I can see where the criticism is coming from—and who knows, if in the end I'm not able to make a difference, they may end up being right. But I'll try hard to make them wrong.

There's also the matter of money, and that's an entirely different can of worms. There are people in this country, entrepreneurs, who have started from zero and have become household names. These people should be admired, and instead we distrust them. Maybe I'd get a better press if I said I was doing it for free. I believe the fact that there's money involved distorts how my work is perceived. I swear I haven't sold myself out to Arabia; this is not going to change my life in any way. The reason I'm doing this, is that I want to devote my future to this kind of endeavors.

INTERVIEWER: Do you see yourself as a contender to win Roland Garros?

NADAL: That's impossible to answer right now. Today it's very hard to see myself winning, but my hope is that I will be fit and able to enjoy myself on court by the time RG rolls around. If I thought I had zero chances, I'd be doing something else already.

INTERVIEWER: Do you have a clear idea of what would be the ideal way to retire?

NADAL: Yes, but I'm not telling you :)
 
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ALCARAZWON

Professional
Does that sound like RG or Olympics this year to anyone?! Or maybe not?!
He's saying farewell to each event on the calendar in 2024, so no chance of him retiring before the US Open.
If he's still winning slams this year, I think he'll play AO 2025 and then maybe retire at RG 2025 or just keep playing.
But if he's not winning slams this year, he'll maybe retire at Laver Cup 2024 or Davis Cup 2024.
 
Last edited:

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru
I'll give it a try. I'll paraphrase the original text trying to get across what I think is the right intent, will add some extra notes in brackets [like this]:


INTERVIEWER: Your agreement with Saudi Arabia has been highly controversial...

NADAL: I believe in [societal] progress. I knew I would be heavily criticized, I had assumed that. My actions follow my beliefs, but when I made the choice to accept this challenge, I was aware that it would raise criticism. With situations like this, regardless of how well you justify your actions, there will be people who will see it as purely a bad thing, because that's what they want to see. The reason I went with it was that it aligns with my own personal goals—I'm at the tail end of my career as a player, and my future work will be highly focused on education and sports, which I firmly believe can change the world.

What I see in Saudi Arabia is a willingness to progress. I'm well-informed about all the disagreeable things that have happened and are still happening there, but they do want to open up and enact real progress. 70% of their population is under 35 years old, and these young people are the ones yearning for a change—that's what makes it real. But change can't happen overnight, it's a process, and Arabia is now in the middle of that process, which I believe will make things take a turn for the better.

Maybe I'm wrong and that will end up not happening, but right now I want to contribute to that change, to make sport more ingrained in the country, to make it normal for men and women to learn tennis on equal terms, and the impression I get is that they are on board with this. I don't think public image [sportswashing] is the reason why they reached out to me. I could ignore their call, or accept the challenge. I chose the latter. I'm calm [or "my conscience is clear"] about the reasons I'm doing this, even if that change doesn't materialize and I'm unable to become a positive influence for Arabian people to achieve equality through sport... [the quote cuts off here]

INTERVIEWER (paraphrased): What if there's a homosexual player?

NADAL: That will never be a problem for my academy—but of course, I can't answer for the rest of the country. Right now that situation can be problematic, but my intention is that it stops being so at some point. Things can't change overnight—my hope is that in six, eight or ten years nobody will need to worry about this, and that our presence can help with that. I'll be disappointed if that's not the case.

INTERVIEWER: Have you felt hurt by the criticism?

NADAL: I haven't seen almost any of it, for the sake of my mental health. I'm not one to hold a grudge or seek conflict. If I go out of my way to read the criticism, some of which may be way out of line, I will feel hurt, but especially for the people around me, for my family. I don't know if they have felt hurt—we haven't talked about it—but I'm sure they'd feel hurt about some of the things that people might say. I don't read them because I don't want to be left with a grudge. I can see where the criticism is coming from—and who knows, if in the end I'm not able to make a difference, they may end up being right. But I'll try hard to make them wrong.

There's also the matter of money, and that's an entirely different can of worms. There are people in this country, entrepreneurs, who have started from zero and have become household names. These people should be admired, and instead we distrust them. Maybe I'd get a better press if I said I was doing it for free. I believe the fact that there's money involved distorts how my work is perceived. I swear I haven't sold myself out to Arabia; this is not going to change my life in any way. The reason I'm doing this, is that I want to devote my future to this kind of endeavors.

INTERVIEWER: Do you see yourself as a contender to win Roland Garros?

NADAL: That's impossible to answer right now. Today it's very hard to see myself winning, but my hope is that I will be fit and able to enjoy myself on court by the time RG rolls around. If I thought I had zero chances, I'd be doing something else already.

INTERVIEWER: Do you have a clear idea of what would be the ideal way to retire?

NADAL: Yes, but I'm not telling you :)
Thank you for translating Rafa's interview :giggle:, and (y) to Rafa!!
,,,
 

Beulah Jesus

Hall of Fame
I'll give it a try. I'll paraphrase the original text trying to get across what I think is the right intent, will add some extra notes in brackets [like this]:


INTERVIEWER: Your agreement with Saudi Arabia has been highly controversial...

NADAL: I believe in [societal] progress. I knew I would be heavily criticized, I had assumed that. My actions follow my beliefs, but when I made the choice to accept this challenge, I was aware that it would raise criticism. With situations like this, regardless of how well you justify your actions, there will be people who will see it as purely a bad thing, because that's what they want to see. The reason I went with it was that it aligns with my own personal goals—I'm at the tail end of my career as a player, and my future work will be highly focused on education and sports, which I firmly believe can change the world.

What I see in Saudi Arabia is a willingness to progress. I'm well-informed about all the disagreeable things that have happened and are still happening there, but they do want to open up and enact real progress. 70% of their population is under 35 years old, and these young people are the ones yearning for a change—that's what makes it real. But change can't happen overnight, it's a process, and Arabia is now in the middle of that process, which I believe will make things take a turn for the better.

Maybe I'm wrong and that will end up not happening, but right now I want to contribute to that change, to make sport more ingrained in the country, to make it normal for men and women to learn tennis on equal terms, and the impression I get is that they are on board with this. I don't think public image [sportswashing] is the reason why they reached out to me. I could ignore their call, or accept the challenge. I chose the latter. I'm calm [or "my conscience is clear"] about the reasons I'm doing this, even if that change doesn't materialize and I'm unable to become a positive influence for Arabian people to achieve equality through sport... [the quote cuts off here]

INTERVIEWER (paraphrased): What if there's a homosexual player?

NADAL: That will never be a problem for my academy—but of course, I can't answer for the rest of the country. Right now that situation can be problematic, but my intention is that it stops being so at some point. Things can't change overnight—my hope is that in six, eight or ten years nobody will need to worry about this, and that our presence can help with that. I'll be disappointed if that's not the case.

INTERVIEWER: Have you felt hurt by the criticism?

NADAL: I haven't seen almost any of it, for the sake of my mental health. I'm not one to hold a grudge or seek conflict. If I go out of my way to read the criticism, some of which may be way out of line, I will feel hurt, but especially for the people around me, for my family. I don't know if they have felt hurt—we haven't talked about it—but I'm sure they'd feel hurt about some of the things that people might say. I don't read them because I don't want to be left with a grudge. I can see where the criticism is coming from—and who knows, if in the end I'm not able to make a difference, they may end up being right. But I'll try hard to make them wrong.

There's also the matter of money, and that's an entirely different can of worms. There are people in this country, entrepreneurs, who have started from zero and have become household names. These people should be admired, and instead we distrust them. Maybe I'd get a better press if I said I was doing it for free. I believe the fact that there's money involved distorts how my work is perceived. I swear I haven't sold myself out to Arabia; this is not going to change my life in any way. The reason I'm doing this, is that I want to devote my future to this kind of endeavors.

INTERVIEWER: Do you see yourself as a contender to win Roland Garros?

NADAL: That's impossible to answer right now. Today it's very hard to see myself winning, but my hope is that I will be fit and able to enjoy myself on court by the time RG rolls around. If I thought I had zero chances, I'd be doing something else already.

INTERVIEWER: Do you have a clear idea of what would be the ideal way to retire?

NADAL: Yes, but I'm not telling you :)

Thank you for this.

Rafa articulates his reasoning and thought process beautifully..The main takeaway for me from this interview is that Rafa is preparing for the next phase of his life post-retirement and that factored into his decision with the Saudis.

He also believes he can still be competitive and that's why he hasn't retired yet.

I'm rooting for Rafa.
 

Rattie

Legend
I'll give it a try. I'll paraphrase the original text trying to get across what I think is the right intent, will add some extra notes in brackets [like this]:


INTERVIEWER: Your agreement with Saudi Arabia has been highly controversial...

NADAL: I believe in [societal] progress. I knew I would be heavily criticized, I had assumed that. My actions follow my beliefs, but when I made the choice to accept this challenge, I was aware that it would raise criticism. With situations like this, regardless of how well you justify your actions, there will be people who will see it as purely a bad thing, because that's what they want to see. The reason I went with it was that it aligns with my own personal goals—I'm at the tail end of my career as a player, and my future work will be highly focused on education and sports, which I firmly believe can change the world.

What I see in Saudi Arabia is a willingness to progress. I'm well-informed about all the disagreeable things that have happened and are still happening there, but they do want to open up and enact real progress. 70% of their population is under 35 years old, and these young people are the ones yearning for a change—that's what makes it real. But change can't happen overnight, it's a process, and Arabia is now in the middle of that process, which I believe will make things take a turn for the better.

Maybe I'm wrong and that will end up not happening, but right now I want to contribute to that change, to make sport more ingrained in the country, to make it normal for men and women to learn tennis on equal terms, and the impression I get is that they are on board with this. I don't think public image [sportswashing] is the reason why they reached out to me. I could ignore their call, or accept the challenge. I chose the latter. I'm calm [or "my conscience is clear"] about the reasons I'm doing this, even if that change doesn't materialize and I'm unable to become a positive influence for Arabian people to achieve equality through sport... [the quote cuts off here]

INTERVIEWER (paraphrased): What if there's a homosexual player?

NADAL: That will never be a problem for my academy—but of course, I can't answer for the rest of the country. Right now that situation can be problematic, but my intention is that it stops being so at some point. Things can't change overnight—my hope is that in six, eight or ten years nobody will need to worry about this, and that our presence can help with that. I'll be disappointed if that's not the case.

INTERVIEWER: Have you felt hurt by the criticism?

NADAL: I haven't seen almost any of it, for the sake of my mental health. I'm not one to hold a grudge or seek conflict. If I go out of my way to read the criticism, some of which may be way out of line, I will feel hurt, but especially for the people around me, for my family. I don't know if they have felt hurt—we haven't talked about it—but I'm sure they'd feel hurt about some of the things that people might say. I don't read them because I don't want to be left with a grudge. I can see where the criticism is coming from—and who knows, if in the end I'm not able to make a difference, they may end up being right. But I'll try hard to make them wrong.

There's also the matter of money, and that's an entirely different can of worms. There are people in this country, entrepreneurs, who have started from zero and have become household names. These people should be admired, and instead we distrust them. Maybe I'd get a better press if I said I was doing it for free. I believe the fact that there's money involved distorts how my work is perceived. I swear I haven't sold myself out to Arabia; this is not going to change my life in any way. The reason I'm doing this, is that I want to devote my future to this kind of endeavors.

INTERVIEWER: Do you see yourself as a contender to win Roland Garros?

NADAL: That's impossible to answer right now. Today it's very hard to see myself winning, but my hope is that I will be fit and able to enjoy myself on court by the time RG rolls around. If I thought I had zero chances, I'd be doing something else already.

INTERVIEWER: Do you have a clear idea of what would be the ideal way to retire?

NADAL: Yes, but I'm not telling you :)
Thank you for translating this. Much appreciated (y) :)
 
Thank you so much for translating that interview, @aldeayeah. I feel a lot better about Rafa’s involvement after reading that, and I believe 100 percent that those are his true beliefs and feelings on the situation and that he is going into this with complete sincerity. He knew he would garner severe criticism and did it anyway because he thinks it’s right, and I really admire that.

On a completely separate note, I was quite disappointed not to see Rafa playing Doha, and please God I want to see him in Indian Wells. Go Rafa!
 

Rattie

Legend

Click the tweet to see the thread.

"In the clay season there are many very exciting and unforgettable tournaments for me. If you ask me if I would sign on to just play Roland Garros and the Olympic Games, I would say no."
"I will play what I can within my reality and within an objective vision that I cannot lose sight of that I want to play Roland Garros. I have to see what physical condition I arrive on earth in to take the minimum risks and arrive at Roland Garros in optimal conditions as much as possible […]. It would be nonsense to tell you my calendar today because what I thought or wanted it to be is not going to be. My calendar will be as much as possible within my possibilities and the reality that I live at each moment. My hope is to at least be able to play the clay season in acceptable conditions and I am going to work for it. The Doha decision is aimed at that, to not make mistakes before the part of the season in which I would like, I am not saying to be competitive to achieve great things, but to be healthy to be able to enjoy and compete."
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru

Rafa Nadal Foundation


The 2nd tournament of the 2024 Rafa Nadal Tour started today. It’s taking place in the town of Seville (in Spanish: Sevilla) from 17 – 25 February. This is the 11th edition of the RN Tour created by Rafa's foundation in 2014.


The RN Tour is an annual junior tennis circuit for boys & girls under 16 years old in Spain. The circuit consists of tournaments taking place in different cities across Spain and is divided into three age groups: under-12, under-14 and under-16. The tour was created by Rafa's foundation in 2014.

Spain's leading insurance company, Mapfre, was the title sponsor of the Tour from 2014 to 2020. Since 2021, the Tour has been sponsored by Banco Sandander, a Spanish multinational bank, which is also Spain's largest bank.

Tournaments have been played in 4 - 10 cities (more than once in some cities) each year. The tour-ending Master Final has been held at Rafa's sports centre /academy in Manacor, Mallorca, since 2016.

In 2024, the tournaments will take place in 8 cities: Barcelona (4 times), Seville, Telde (on the island of Gran Canaria), Alicante, Zaragoza, Madrid, Gijón and Manacor.

The last tournament – the tour-ending Master Final – will be played at Rafa’s sports centre /academy at the beginning of November. The top seven players in the circuit’s ranking in under-12 and under-14 age groups, along with the top six in the under-16 group will qualify for the Master Final. In addition, the winners of the "Values Trophy" will participate in the tour-ending tournament (two under-12 and two under-14 players).

Carlos Alcaraz won the U-14 title in the 2016 Rafa Nadal Tour Master Final held at Rafa’s academy.


(y) to the Rafa Nadal Foundation!
...
 

SpinWizard

Rookie
It does not look good for Rafa. In Brisbane he looked impressive, because he had entire month of training block in December, but right now it looks like he had another major setback. Probably did not train intensively for the last couple of weeks.

I doesn't look promising at all to be honest... I won't be surprised if he plays only RG and Olympics and that's it.
 

clayqueen

Talk Tennis Guru
Is this true that Rafa has said he doesn't want his son to be a professional tennis player?
 
Last edited:

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru

Relaxing Time

Rafa participates in the 2024 Balearic Mid-Amateur Men's & Women’s Championship (for golfers 25+ years old) at the Santa Ponsa golf club this weekend. He leads the competition after Saturday's 1st day of the tournament that will end on Sunday. 78 golfers played on Saturday.
... (I deleted the rest of the content of my post from the reply. Click on my username to see the full content of my post I quoted.)

Rafa won the 2024 Balearic Mid-Amateur (golf) Championship! The tournament was held at the Santa Ponsa golf club in Mallorca on Saturday & Sunday. 75 male golfers participated in the tournament.
https://golfdirecto.com/micro/game/...es&view=day&category=65d0cd2f9072e5742a5d7dd9

On Saturday:
GGn8AYcWcAEx6Gl

Via Ultima Hora

In 2021, Rafa finished the Balearic Mid-Amateur Championship tied for 6th place among 64 golfers and in 2022 - in 2nd place among 79 golfers.
animated-smileys-sport-038.gif.pagespeed.ce._cL4pPSFiX.gif
1f3c6.svg

Vamos Rafa!!!
...
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru
Rafa won the 2024 Balearic Mid-Amateur (golf) Championship! The tournament was held at the Santa Ponsa golf club in Mallorca on Saturday & Sunday. 75 male golfers participated in the tournament.
...... (I deleted the rest of the content of my post from the reply. Click on my username to see the full content of my post I quoted.)
A couple more pictures and a clip.

GGomcnnWwAALtes

Via Ultima Hora

Rafa was accompanied by his dad on Sunday:
GGomiBnXEAAbE4R

Via Ultima Hora


animated-smileys-sport-038.gif.pagespeed.ce._cL4pPSFiX.gif
1f3c6.svg

Vamos Rafa!!!
,,,
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru
Is this true that Rafa has said he doesn't want his son to be a professional tennis player?
Rafa said he'll let his son decide what sports the latter wants to play.

laSexta TV, 15 Feb 2024: ¤¤ He [Rafa] also confesses, laughing, that he would like his son to dedicate himself to another sport, but deep down "it hurts me to say that, because with everything that sport has given me... But if he wants to play tennis, I would support him 100%, I wouldn't veto him at all," says Nadal.¤¤ (Translated from Spanish via Google.)
 

JustMy2Cents

Hall of Fame
one more ATP pro who grew up idolizing Rafa [@weakera for our non existent 'list' :)]
Argentine 23 yr old leftie Acosta who won the Argentina Open today

First-time winner spotlight: Facundo Diaz Acosta, who wants to play Nadal​

Argentine reflects on his big breakthrough

What about Rafael Nadal as a person and player made him your idol growing up?
I grew up watching him every match, every Roland Garros. Hopefully he comes back to the Tour and I can play against him.

Rafa is such an inspiration!!
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru

Interview


Rafa was interviewed by a female journalist at the Spanish TV channel La Sexta (stylised as laSexta) last Wednesday. They talked about various topics. The tweet below includes a short article about his contract with the Saudi Tennis Federation. But instead of translating it, I post a longer article in English published by Tennis World. It’s useful to read Rafa’s explanations (i.e. factual information), because his critics are constantly posting their imaginations everywhere (on websites and social media).


Tennis World, 17 Feb 2024: ¤¤ A couple of weeks ago, a 22-time Major winner Rafael Nadal embraced a new role, becoming the ambassador for the Saudi Tennis Federation.

Nadal is focused on promoting tennis in Saudi Arabia, highlighting their progress in every area. Rafa is a pivotal figure in Saudi Arabia's Vision 2030 initiative to encourage increased participation in tennis and other sports among boys and girls.

The Spaniard will open his tennis complex in Saudi Arabia and visit the country at least once a year to follow the development and oversee a junior tennis clinic.

The upcoming stars will use the new facilities and work with high-profile coaches, carving their paths toward college tennis or the professional circuit. Furthermore, Nadal and his coaches from Mallorca will impart their knowledge and inspiration to Saudi teams associated with the Olympic & Paralympic Committees, contributing to the overall growth of the sport in this country.

Saudi Arabia has dedicated substantial efforts to encouraging its youth to embrace athletic objectives. It's apparent in programs like Tennis For All, which introduced tennis to 30,000 schoolchildren in 2023.

With the sport incorporated into the curriculum of 200 schools in 2024, the aim is to expand this number to 400 by the following year. The number of tennis clubs and registered young players is growing, correlated with developing national tournaments across various age categories.

Saudi Arabia went beyond tennis, opening its doors to various sporting events, including football, motorsports, equestrian, esports and golf.

The 2023 Next Gen ATP Finals marked a historic moment as the inaugural professional tennis event in the country, and the event will remain in Saudi Arabia in the upcoming years.

With Nadal's involvement, the expectations are high for the continued evolution of tennis in Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia is poised for an exciting chapter in its sporting journey, seeking the 2024 edition of the WTA Finals and preparing for the Six Kings Slam [Rafa included] and many more.

Despite doubters, Nadal's ambassadorship heralds a promising era for tennis enthusiasts in Saudi Arabia, and the sport development in this country will only get more significant and extended. "Saudi Arabia pays me, but I do not need that money; it will not change my life.

I have not signed a super contract like other athletes, and I'm fine with that. I'm committed to promoting tennis in Saudi Arabia, and that's my goal. I have done it because I am excited about the future. They do not need me to wash their image about themselves; it's not objective," Rafael Nadal said. ¤¤

https://www.t e n n i sworldusa.org/tennis/news/Rafael_Nadal/142711/rafael-nadal-s-saudi-saga-a-story-of-values-over-money/ - remove spaces

(y) to Rafa!
...
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru

Rafa - a Businessman


Rafa and his business partners, among them Cristiano Ronaldo, are going to open their new TATEL and TOTO restaurants in Dubai in Q2 of 2024.

TATEL Dubai will be the 8th restaurant in the TATEL restaurant chain, whose first restaurant was opened in Madrid in 2014. TOTO Dubai will be the 2nd restaurant in its chain after launching the first one in Madrid in 2022. Other TATEL restaurants are located on the island of Ibiza (Spain), in Beverly Hills (California, USA), near Doha (the capital of Qatar), on the outskirts of Riyadh (the capital of Saudi Arabia), in Mexico City and Valencia, Spain.

TimeOut, 19 February 2024 (excerpts):
¤¤ Restaurants backed by Cristiano Ronaldo and Rafael Nadal to open soon in Dubai

Tatel and Toto are opening in Dubai in Q2 of 2024.

Two of the biggest sports stars in the world are bringing two new restaurants to Dubai.

Plans for Tatel and Toto were first announced back in 2022, with the two finally on the verge of opening in the emirate.

When it comes to pure star power, it will be difficult to outshine Tatel and Toto which are backed by football star Cristiano Ronaldo and tennis player Rafael Nadal.

The restaurants have proven to be massively popular in Madrid thanks in part to their celebrity clientele and fantastic food and beverage offerings.

The two restaurants will open at Hotel Boulevard, Autograph Collection in Downtown Dubai. …

Tatel will offer a Spanish Mediterranean character with daily live entertainment. … Toto takes its inspiration from classic Italian cinema in both its décor and its menu as it pays homage to legendary film Cinema Paradiso. ¤¤
https://www.timeoutdubai.com/news/tatel-and-toto-dubai

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The TATEL and TOTO restaurant chains are operated by Mabel Hospitality that is a subsidiary of Mabel Capital, the investment company owned by Rafa (33%) and two Spanish businessmen. The three aforementioned persons own the subsisidiary in partnership with multiple famous sportspeople and artists, among them Spanish basketball icon Pau Gasol (retired from pro basketball in 2021), Portuguese football superhero Cristiano Ronaldo and multi-award winning Spanish-American singer Enrique Iglesias.

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Roforot

Professional
Kudos for Rafa for being respectful to the Saudi culture and not trying to impose the supposed enlightened modern ideals on their civilization.
I hope to see him push deep in the remaining slams and for memorable matches w/ Sinner and Alcaraz.
I'm saying this as a Federer fan :).
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru

The Rafa Team


Rafa will be accompanied by physiotherapist José Félix González at the Las Vegas exhibition event and Indian Wells Masters.

González has worked with many pro tennis players. He runs his own Sports Physiotherapy clinic in Palma de Mallorca since October 1, 2018.




Vamos the Rafa Team!
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octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru

Rafa Nadal Club in Malaga

Rafa is going to open the Rafa Nadal Club in Malaga (a port city on the Costa del Sol in Southern Spain) in cooperation with Sierra Blanca Estate, a leading developer and Real Estate agency of luxury homes in Marbella and the Costa del Sol.

Cadenaser.com: ¤¤ Sierra Blanca Estates and the Rafa Nadal Club announced this Friday the brand assignment agreement that will allow the Marbella developer to build and operate the first sports project in the city of Malaga (and on the peninsula) linked to the image of the Spanish tennis player, considered one of the best international professionals of this sport discipline of all time. ¤¤ (Translated from Spanish via Google.)
.... (I deleted the rest of the content of my post from the reply. Click on my username to see the full content of my post I quoted.)
The Malaga City Council (a port city on the Costa del Sol in Southern Spain) approved a plan to build the Rafa Nadal Club to replace the existing Inacua Racquet Centre. The initial plan was to construct the RN Club on the plot of land next to the Palacio de Deportes Martin Carpena, but the city council wants to reserve the land for a potential park-and-ride facility.

Rafa is going to build the RN Club in cooperation with Sierra Blanca Estate, a leading developer and Real Estate agency of luxury homes in Marbella and the Costa del Sol. The sports complex will include semi-indoor clay courts, outdoor hard courts, paddle courts, a central court with stands to host tournaments, an outdoor swimming pool, a multipurpose building (that houses a gym, spa, shop, restaurant, a Rafa museum) and an underground car park.

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