Need Advice on Junior Tennis in Australia

RF19

Rookie
Hi there guys!
I moved from Melbourne to California 5 years ago and have a teenage son that plays tennis regularly. He is at a stage where his game could take him to a serious contender, either play college or more. I also have a situation with work that I am contemplating to return to Australia. I wanted to check if its a good idea keeping my son's ambitions in mind. How do you see the Junior Tennis scene in Australia? Does it have better academies if I want him to pursue further? I see that competition is pretty fierce in US and especially the Bay Area I live in is fairly crowded for every tournament. Love to hear your thoughts.
 

Keendog

Semi-Pro
Hi there guys!
I moved from Melbourne to California 5 years ago and have a teenage son that plays tennis regularly. He is at a stage where his game could take him to a serious contender, either play college or more. I also have a situation with work that I am contemplating to return to Australia. I wanted to check if its a good idea keeping my son's ambitions in mind. How do you see the Junior Tennis scene in Australia? Does it have better academies if I want him to pursue further? I see that competition is pretty fierce in US and especially the Bay Area I live in is fairly crowded for every tournament. Love to hear your thoughts.
Can't really tell you sorry, but I know if they are any good access to top coaches generally isn't a problem here. If there are as many as you say in the US, how hard/expensive is it to get a quality junior coach?

For competitive play a lot of parents have complained to me that there isn't a lot of other kids to play and those kids weren't even that good. That said the adults league is strong, Melbourne Pennant 1 has some WTA players in them.

In melbourne there are a couple of high schools with a tennis program, can't tell you if they are good programs but you can play tennis and have it count towards your curriculum which might be handy.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
Hi there guys!
I moved from Melbourne to California 5 years ago and have a teenage son that plays tennis regularly. He is at a stage where his game could take him to a serious contender, either play college or more. I also have a situation with work that I am contemplating to return to Australia. I wanted to check if its a good idea keeping my son's ambitions in mind. How do you see the Junior Tennis scene in Australia? Does it have better academies if I want him to pursue further? I see that competition is pretty fierce in US and especially the Bay Area I live in is fairly crowded for every tournament. Love to hear your thoughts.
If your teenage son has ambitions to play US College Tennis or more the answer is simple ...

STAY IN THE U.S.A. !!! ... or go to EUROPE (SPAIN !!!)

When it comes to Tennis, Australia is "literally" at the "End of the Earth".

It is possible to make it from Australia, but you need bucket loads of money. A typical 16yo would require somewhere between $40,000 to $100,000 AUD in that first year to have a serious crack at getting a decent ITF Junior Ranking which could act as a springboard to bigger and better things. (Most of that money is spent on Travel Costs and Coaching Support.)

The Australian Tennis Academies and Tennis Schools cannot compare with those in Europe and the USA. There is insufficient player diversity and the facilities are substandard apart from the National Tennis Academy in Melbourne (whose programs are usually By Invitation Only)

Most decent Australian Junior Players are leaving Australia to further their tennis development as soon as possible, either to US Colleges, or European (mainly Spanish) Private Tennis Academies.
 

bertrevert

Hall of Fame
Heard on the grapevine that the good folks of the Aussie player Matthew Barton just plain spent much on getting him up to where he got to. Heard much the same for Greg Jones. I don't know but when you hear that it really sinks in how few really get a proper crack at things. Deep pockets. At a grass roots level TA are now talking to us in clubs about NOT losing the youngsters from the sport. Because previously they've been pushed so hard towards comp if that doesn't work out, or if thy get sick of losing, then the young age group just up and LEAVES the sport. Now TA is asking us in clubs to provide the structure to keep them on. Tennis here has not done what other sport codes have done to grab and KEEP the younger players. So yes there is structure here for young comp players but no plan B...

No doubt read this (and other earlier ones)
https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/does-college-tennis-prepare-you-for-the-pros.634662
 

RF19

Rookie
If your teenage son has ambitions to play US College Tennis or more the answer is simple ...

STAY IN THE U.S.A. !!! ... or go to EUROPE (SPAIN !!!)

When it comes to Tennis, Australia is "literally" at the "End of the Earth".

It is possible to make it from Australia, but you need bucket loads of money. A typical 16yo would require somewhere between $40,000 to $100,000 AUD in that first year to have a serious crack at getting a decent ITF Junior Ranking which could act as a springboard to bigger and better things. (Most of that money is spent on Travel Costs and Coaching Support.)

The Australian Tennis Academies and Tennis Schools cannot compare with those in Europe and the USA. There is insufficient player diversity and the facilities are substandard apart from the National Tennis Academy in Melbourne (whose programs are usually By Invitation Only)

Most decent Australian Junior Players are leaving Australia to further their tennis development as soon as possible, either to US Colleges, or European (mainly Spanish) Private Tennis Academies.
Thank you, really appreciate the honest answer. I did realize no matter where you go, money plays a bigger part for bringing up a tennis player, I am probably spending 15-18k every year for the coaching, tournaments, shoes, and clothes right now. Unless he gets to the top 50 of northern California, I don't see that I can continue supporting since its going to cost a lot more as the game gets deeper and I do see costs around traveling interstate for national tournaments and its the dream vs. cost -its a brutal reality actually. But again - what is the most complex issue for me is to get a 'Tennis Psychic' that could really say whether he has it in him or not - cos I look at some players at 19 doing so well and I go on to think, how the hell is that possible?
 

RF19

Rookie
Heard on the grapevine that the good folks of the Aussie player Matthew Barton just plain spent much on getting him up to where he got to. Heard much the same for Greg Jones. I don't know but when you hear that it really sinks in how few really get a proper crack at things. Deep pockets. At a grass roots level TA are now talking to us in clubs about NOT losing the youngsters from the sport. Because previously they've been pushed so hard towards comp if that doesn't work out, or if thy get sick of losing, then the young age group just up and LEAVES the sport. Now TA is asking us in clubs to provide the structure to keep them on. Tennis here has not done what other sport codes have done to grab and KEEP the younger players. So yes there is structure here for young comp players but no plan B...

No doubt read this (and other earlier ones)
https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/does-college-tennis-prepare-you-for-the-pros.634662

Thanks for the response, I did like the link and go through the responses. I am really lost here; not sure what to do, I feel absolutely helpless trying to help a kid with big dreams, but again - I am ready to ride as far as I can and see if we get anywhere.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
@RF19, firstly keep in mind that anything is possible.

Based on my limited knowledge of some of the better juniors in Australia. IMO, the minimum p.a. spends required to take the sport seriously and give the player a decent crack at getting to the Pros. (This spend covers pretty much everything involved and assumes the player does not get injured or require rehab support etc.). Some of this spend might be mitigated with private sponsorship or financial support from Tennis Clubs or Associations.

13yo - $20K AUD
14yo - $20K
15yo - $30K to $50K
16yo - $40K to $60K (ITF Junior Level around Asia Pacific)
17yo - $40K to $60K (ITF Junior Level to Europe)
18yo - $60K to $100K (Futures and Challengers)
19yo - $100K (Futures and Challengers. ATP Qualifiers)
20yo - $100K plus (Challengers, ATP Qualifiers, ATP)

So, IMO, you are looking at anywhere from $300K to $600K AUD over that 8 odd year period if no other financial support is provided. (Support from outside sources might reduce that spend by anywhere from 10% to 80%!).

Of course, you will have a fair idea of how competitive the player will be by the time they are 18yo. That will dictate how much money to plow into the player beyond 18yo when it starts to become a lot more expensive because of the increased travel and accommodation costs.

But keep in mind that if the player shows a lot of promise as a 16yo or 17yo and they get the attention of the National Body (eg. Tennis Australia), they might get access to some playing opportunities (eg. Wildcards etc.). All it takes is a decent performance at a big Tournament and the player then wins enough prize money to fund most of the next year. We do see that happen from time to time. But the key is to make to most of the opportunity when it is presented.
 

RF19

Rookie
@Karma Tennis - Thanks for the detailed input, very good insight for me. Now its time for me to go start making that money and saving that money. One thing is pretty clear that Tennis remains a rich man's sport, and it still is. If one was to travel overseas and compete at a full time and has to have coaching and fitness trainers, its a solid loaded expense budget.
 
Top