Need some help regarding stringing

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by fivepointfiveplayer, Nov 10, 2017.

  1. fivepointfiveplayer

    fivepointfiveplayer New User

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    So I'm planning on buying a stringing machine to learn stringing. I have decided to buy the cheap klippermate to start off. I was searching around for issues with bad string job for first timers and I came across this thread. This is a bad string job

    https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/botched-string-job-query.527336/

    So can someone explain what exactly is wrong in that in detail without too much technical terms I don't understand? How do you say the strings are wavy? I don't see an apparent mistake in the string job. But people on that thread are calling it terrible so I want to know why.
     
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  2. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    First off, the racquet in question is supposed to have 20 crosses. And there are not supposed to be any shared holes.

    The racquet in the picture has 21 crosses, and a couple of the grommets have been stretched to share both a cross string and a main string.

    There's no way to sugar coat it - these are terrible errors, illustrating inexperience and incompetence.
     
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  3. krisdrum

    krisdrum Rookie

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    1) Too many cross strings (the ones that go across the racquet, not up and down running parallel to the handle/grip)
    2) Strung with "shared holes". More than 1 string going through the same grommet/hole. This racquet should not have shared holes.

    Each racquet has a unique "pattern" of mains (up and down), crosses (side to side) and which string goes through which holes, where the strings should start, where they should end and be tied off. The stringer of that racquet did not follow the right pattern.

    As a new stringer, there are lots of places to find these patterns and videos/instructions to help guide you through your first few string jobs. I'm new to stringing as well, and have found the process pretty straightforward and rather gratifying. I'd say buying my own machine has been one of the best tennis purchases I've made.
     
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  4. jwocky

    jwocky New User

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    @fivepointfiveplayer -
    In the picture you referenced:
    X21 - the last cross is correct
    HOWEVER:
    X20 (second cross from bottom or twentieth counting from top) should not be there at all,
    and then
    RM8 (outermost - eighth - main on right side) at the bottom should be in grommet 9, which is one grommet hole to the right; that is, the one where that "extra" 20th cross is shown.

    Compare with this picture (https://img.tennis-warehouse.com/reviews/PCT-r1.jpg) from the TW review of that Babolat Pure Control Tour racquet.

    Hope this helps.

    There are many threads with advice so use the search feature first - but as a first time stringer please take your time with your first several racquets (esp if they are different brand/types) because the reward for going fast is that one gets to do it all over again!
     
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  5. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    Non-technical answer - at least one of the crosses goes through a wrong pair of holes (meant only for the mains) and the end of one of the mains passes through the wrong hole meant for the crosses. To avoid this problem take a picture of your racquet before you cut the old strings and place pieces of tape showing where there the knots are tied.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017
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  6. jwocky

    jwocky New User

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    Minor point - the above assumes that a racquet as received was strung correctly in the first place.
     
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  7. gmatheis

    gmatheis Hall of Fame

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    Don't get scared , I have been stringing for several years now, but even when I started I never did that to a racquet. Take your time and until you know frames well enough to remember exactly how they are strung, look up the stringing pattern (klippermate site is a good place to do a quick lookup).
     
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  8. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Here is the simple explanation. The racket pattern is 16x20, with no shared holes meaning no grommets except for tie offs has two strings, and the mains skip 8H and 8T.

    The left side of the frame was strung correctly but on the right side the stringer did not skip 8T. Instead the outer main is in the 8T grommet. That’s it in a nutshell. Once you make a mistake like that whatever you do to try to cover it up is just wrong too.

    Had the mains been strung properly there would have been 20 empty grommet holes on each side of the frame for the 20 crosses. This racket should be symmetrical, when stringing mains, what ever you do on one side you do on the other.

    EDIT: here is a page that contains a pic of how it should look.
    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/PC/PCReview.html
     
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  9. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    @fivepointfiveplayer to make it even easier to understand if you look in the lower right corner of the racket the main string in 8T (red arrow) should be in 9T (green arrow.) Also no grommet should be shared with a main and cross (red arrow) and there should only be 20 crosses.
    [​IMG]
     
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  10. McLovin

    McLovin Hall of Fame

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    And to be clear, @fivepointfiveplayer, '8H' means the 8th grommet hole on the Head, or top of the frame, counting out from the middle, and '8T' means the 8th grommet hole on the Throat, counting out from the middle.

    Its important to note because frames have different skip holes, some have 'shared holes', as @Irvin described above, and some have different skip holes for the Head & Throat, some times multiple skip holes (see http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Head_Graphene_XT_Prestige_Midplus/descpageRCHEAD-GXTPMP.html).

    And as others have noted, the one you referenced is an abomination. That person should be barred from ever stringing racquets again...
     
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  11. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I wouldn’t go so far to say the stringer should be barred from stringing, although it should never have been given back to the customer. All that really went wrong is he didn’t skip 8T on the lower right. But then instead of fixing the problem he tried to cover it up. We all make mistakes.
     
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  12. McLovin

    McLovin Hall of Fame

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    Ok, maybe not barred. How’s 50 lashes with a wet noodle?
     
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  13. Wes

    Wes Rookie

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    The canings will begin at 3pm.
     
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  14. chrisingrassia

    chrisingrassia Professional

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    OP -
    As a newbie, here's my suggestion for your first few racquets.
    Take the unstrung racquet and just look at the grommet arrangement and the printed pattern on the racquet. It's usually inside the throat. Just look at the grommets knowing what the pattern is (pattern = 18x18, 16x19, etc). Map out visually how you'd string it.
    Literally, 97% of racquets are going to be strung the same way and look the same. Really only the shared grommet racquets and the "fanned" patterns will make you plan ahead.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2017
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  15. Karma Tennis

    Karma Tennis Professional

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    Lot of good answers here. But to keep it simple, think about things this way.

    Every racquets has its own unique pattern for how it should be strung to get the best result. Most popular racquets have a documented racquet layout which you can usually find on the manufacturers web site. Alternatively, you can ask here on the TW forums and you will get the answer you are after.

    It is important that you quickly learn the terminology regarding the description of racquet frames. Understanding the way grommets are numbered, which holes are for tie-off knots, which holes are shared, etc. will make it much easier for you to string racquets properly.

    As @chrisingrassia has suggested, many different racquets are strung in a very similar way. But it really does pay to plan ahead and know exactly what string goes where before you start. Also, do not assume that the way you receive a racquet from someone is the way it is supposed to be strung. It will usually be the case, however it's a good idea to seek out and check the racquet string bed layout before you start. Very important if you have not seen that particular racquet previously.

    Happy Stringing. Won't take you long to get the hang of it. If I can do it, anyone can.
     
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  16. fivepointfiveplayer

    fivepointfiveplayer New User

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    @everyone: Thanks for all your information. I understand now. I ordered a klippermate, and its on its way. I'm excited to string for the first time. Hope I don't botch the string job.
     
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  17. esgee48

    esgee48 Legend

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    These would be the silly Head Instincts [shared holes] and the even sillier Granny Snowshoe frames from Head and Wilson. The fan patterns will drive you crazy because of the multiple skips at the top. If you ever do a shared hole, you need to have scrap string around to put into the shared holes to avoid crossovers. o_O
     
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  18. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Good tip, I was stringing a Head GrapheneXT Instinct earlier today which has four shared holes at the top and bottom of the racket. In order to avoid any crossovers I ran in the top 3 crosses before tensioning the outer 4 mains. I did just about the same with a (K)Zero fan racket yesterday. I ran in the top six crosses to keep the cross overs down and make sure I skipped the right holes (mains skip 5, 7, 9, 11, and 12H / no skips at throat.)
     
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  19. fivepointfiveplayer

    fivepointfiveplayer New User

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    Got my machine and strung it with Klippermate power burst. Took me 2.5 hours for the whole process right from unpacking. Looks good to me except the knots. They look ugly. Man weaving with poly is hard. I have respect for stringers and their speed now.

    Here's a picture.

    https://imgur.com/a/sEXSp
     
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  20. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    Good job! A couple hours first time out isn't bad at all. With practice, your time will come down, and your knots will improve as well. Check out YouTube for some instructional videos on knots.

    Here's another tip for you that helps with poly - weave in a 'V.' That is, weave the first half of the cross toward the throat, and then weave the second of the cross half back up toward the hoop. Weaving on an angle can be quite a bit less difficult than weaving straight across.

    Finally, when you get to the last couple crosses, you might have better luck with more of a sewing technique to weave those. It can be fairly tough to push weave the final crosses with poly (don't get me wrong - it can be done, but sometimes it's not worth beating up the fingers to do it).

    Happy stringing!
     
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  21. esgee48

    esgee48 Legend

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    Not bad for the 1st job. Remember to straighten your crosses as you tension them. Yours are curved. Your knots will get better. You could learn the Pro Knot, but there's really nothing wrong with your DHHs.

    16x19 isn't too hard. Try doing 18x20 capped Prestiges. When I get those, I always tape my index, middle finger tips and the thumb. Then I get a beer before starting.
     
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  22. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    Used to have a customer with 4 18x20 Prestige mids. 60 lbs with PHT. :eek: Fortunately he moved out of town. If he came back, I think I'd rather slit my wrists with the awl than string his racquets again.
     
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  23. esgee48

    esgee48 Legend

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    I share your pain. My guy only has 3 of them and he likes BBO 16 at 48. So at least there are no sharp edges. And I see him once a month for 3 or every 2 weeks for 1 or 2. Slowing down cuz of the season so I probably won't see him until after the New Year. But like you, wish he would get a new set of frames.
     
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  24. fivepointfiveplayer

    fivepointfiveplayer New User

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    Thanks.

    Funnily as I went further down the crosses I ended up doing that. And you're right as you go down towards the end of crosses it gets exponentially hard. It's unbelievable how long it took me to finish the last two crosses. I ended up sewing them one main after another.
     
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  25. fivepointfiveplayer

    fivepointfiveplayer New User

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    Thanks.. I did try to straighten every cross but I guess as I went further down I didn't do them as much. Will keep that in mind for my 2nd racquet which I will string tomorrow.
     
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  26. am1899

    am1899 Professional

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    Here's a suggestion. Of course, always weave "1 ahead." When you finish weaving your next cross, push as much of the string as possible up against the cross above it (which, of course has already been tensioned). (This does 2 things - it can help mitigate crosses bowing down toward the throat, and its also a great way to check for misweaves). Now tension the cross, and while you do so, try to keep it straight with your off hand.
     
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