Net clearance

Saul Goode

Semi-Pro
In doubles, you need to have very little net clearance or very high (lob). It is totally different from the singles game.

Return of serve is usually CC. In singles, DTL is a good strategy.

Basically, whatever you have been taught in singles is wrong for doubles.
Is it, though?
 
I liked it when I used to get it in print at the club. I may be old fashioned, but tennis stuff is just more readable when it is available in print and can be picked up at a tennis resort and enjoyed near the courts along with a drink.
We are not that publication, which appears to no longer be available in the US. We're a small, online-only publication for recreational and league tennis players.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
We are not that publication, which appears to no longer be available in the US. We're a small, online-only publication for recreational and league tennis players.
Then is this your site?


How come you and the magazine have the same name?
 
Then is this your site?


How come you and the magazine have the same name?
Yep... that's my site.

TLM offers recreational and league players useful information and tips that not only can help their game, but also many other aspects of their lives as it pertains to non-pro players, thus the name "Tennis Life". The other magazine had mostly information about the pros themselves and tournaments, with a tip or two thrown in for added measure.
 

user92626

Legend
Then is this your site?


How come you and the magazine have the same name?

Yep... that's my site.
uh oh... you won't be able to shake off sureshs now, once you fed his childish curiosity.

He's like a stray kid. Give him a candy and he'll follow you all day and ask stupid questions.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
Latest issue of Inside Tennis has an article about doubles coaching by none other than Mark Knowles. He says doubles requires a different kind of short making, and low net clearance compared to what is taught in singles.

So, in other words. we are taught high net clearance when the opposite is what is required for what the majority of the rec players play (doubles).

Great.
@ByeByePoly wrote about how he had to change his strokes when transitioning from a predominantly singles player to a doubles player, and how it took him a good while to get better. In singles you can finesse and gently move the ball around and give the opponent fits. In doubles the angled, lower trajectory cross court shot is much more important as is the ability to hit spin serves.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
Actually, the REAL measure of a strong doubles player is how he fares with a weak partner. A high-level doubles player will win points with his serve, poach aggressively, and cover ground to make up for his partner. To the other team, he will appear to be everywhere. I have played with such people, including a couple from this forum, and come away wondering how we won when I did almost nothing.
Like. I've been there too. Some on this forum complain non-stop about how they always manage to find weak partners. If you're really good you can carry a weaker partner.
 

Raul_SJ

Legend
Net clearance
@ByeByePoly wrote about how he had to change his strokes when transitioning from a predominantly singles player to a doubles player, and how it took him a good while to get better. In singles you can finesse and gently move the ball around and give the opponent fits. In doubles the angled, lower trajectory cross court shot is much more important as is the ability to hit spin serves.
Don't think the clearance is that critical. The really solid 3.5 doubles guys are able to rally forever with their inside-out and crosscourt baseline groundstrokes.

I try to cut it off at the net but they are too consistent with the angle; can't even get close to it. The clearance is often quite high (2 to 3 feet) and not that much different than singles, but it is not poachable mainly due to the sharp cross court angle.

Of course you are supposed to come to the net, but at 3.5, you will see a lot of baseline rallies.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
Net clearance


Don't think the clearance is that critical. The really solid 3.5 doubles guys are able to rally forever with their inside-out and crosscourt baseline groundstrokes.

I try to cut it off at the net but they are too consistent with the angle; can't even get close to it. The clearance is often quite high (2 to 3 feet) and not that much different than singles, but it is not poachable mainly due to the angle.
One might get away with that at the 3.5 level.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
@ByeByePoly wrote about how he had to change his strokes when transitioning from a predominantly singles player to a doubles player, and how it took him a good while to get better. In singles you can finesse and gently move the ball around and give the opponent fits. In doubles the angled, lower trajectory cross court shot is much more important as is the ability to hit spin serves.
More tactics and selection. One of my strengths in singles was making the opponent move, and have to hit on the run. The hit to opposite corners thing doesn't work well with a net guy blocking one of the corners. 8-B I think this is one of the main reasons a singles only/mainly player often struggles transitionong to doubles ... skills that were rewarded in singles are not in doubles. I already had the strokes, s&v, overhead ... but had to change to the mentality of minimum targeting. The other thing is the narrower ros window. In singles ... any ros in will generally get the point started, even down the middle.
 

undecided

Rookie
I play doubles on occasion and although I suck big time since I do not like to play at the net, I do find that singles strokes are not expected by doubles opponents. I see a lot of dub players just roll the serve in and come to net. I hit a hard angled shot that lands around the service line or deeper and they struggle to control the volley or they are outright passed. Same thing when they chip and charge the net. So yeah, it works both ways.
 

Morch Us

Semi-Pro
Most probably you can get away with high net clearance shots at majority of social rec doubles (where I see a lot of 1-up 1-down). A huge factor is how your opponents play. The doubles shot making really matters only if the opponents makes doubles moves (like both closing in the net etc), otherwise you can get away with singles shots.

Similarly you can get away with 1-up 1-down against opponents playing 1-up 1-down as well, which is what I see a lot in social rec doubles courts.

So, in other words. we are taught high net clearance when the opposite is what is required for what the majority of the rec players play (doubles).
 

Morch Us

Semi-Pro
You understand, this only re-asserts that you don't really know how to play doubles.

we'd lose easily if playing together BUT if the partners left the court for me for play 1 vs 2 (even with the same dubs court vs dub court) I'd beat the same opponent teams handily.
 

user92626

Legend
You understand, this only re-asserts that you don't really know how to play doubles.
That really reasserts nothing. When you lose, you really don't know anything! LOL




Why wonder, I do get strong partners on occasions. If I post about easy wins, people (you?) will say I'm bragging. :)
 
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