New Soft Poly and Juniors

Ken41

New User
Hi Folks,

I have an 11 year old who is using Technifibre NRG2 (multi) 17g strings and recently started breaking them every two to three outings. Very expensive! I tried sneaking in - as mains - the same strings in 16g, while keeping the 17g in the crosses. I kept tension the same (52 lbs).

He hated it. He said it felt like a board, but at the same time he said it felt like he couldn't get the same amount of spin.

My first thought was to try tweaking the tension on the 16g main multi. But then I thought of - and read about - the complications of how that affects the crosses. That sounds like another whole can of worms. Asking around, the majority of kids apparently use poly. But reading here, I was very much afraid of injury.

Sorry to bury the lead, but I'm getting there - promise!

Polys are offered in very thin gauges (19 or 20 even for some strings). They are also offered in softer co-poly makeups. Also, generally, lower tensions are used with poly strings.

So...Wouldn't a soft, thinner gauge copoly, strung at lower tension, play equal or softer to a heavier gauge multi (while also lasting longer)?

I will try to load a TW comparison of NRG2 16g and Volkl Cyclone Tour 19g. The stiffness shows equal.

Your much more experienced thoughts would be greatly appreciated!

Ken
 

Ken41

New User
Oh well, can't seem to load the comparison tool screenshot. Sorry, the Volkl Cyclone Tour is 18g, not 19g. It basically says Stiffness 159 for poly, 158 for multi. Pretty much even. Energy return is 9% better for multi. String to String Friction gives a 112% favor to poly and String to Ball Friction favors poly by 12%.

Tension loss favors multi by 65%. And there, I'd guess, is the rub. But I'm thinking if I change the strings every two weeks, I would still be ahead of the multis, which as mentioned are breaking every 2-3 days. The TW reviewer (an adult) said the 19g Cyclone lasted him three weeks before he felt he had to cut them out.
 

Hansen

Semi-Pro
hello,
i would first try a durable multi like velocity 16 (full bed) or a combination of multi/poly (velocity/cream). if neither of those stringjobs lasts long enough you can try to reverse the strings --> poly/multi. if that also doesn´t work i would start with the softest poly there is and thats cream in my opinion.
cyclone tour is also soft, but has a terrible tension maintenance.
 

Ken41

New User
Sorry, racquet is 2018 Pure Drive Lite.

Thanks, Hansen! Will look at Velocity and Cream. My concern with hybrid strings is it would seem I'd end up having to guess at what variable is causing an effect on how the racquet plays: mains or crosses, which string material, and which string tension. With the fullbed, the only variable is the tension.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
......

So...Wouldn't a soft, thinner gauge copoly, strung at lower tension, play equal or softer to a heavier gauge multi (while also lasting longer)?.......n
IME.., no, poly its its own acquired feel, full heavy strokes or heavier racquets needed to "flex" the strings..
if 16g multi feels like s board at 52lbs,,
any poly at equal or below 52lbs is gonna feel same to worse
Specially on a B.LITE racquet..
I would try another multi..
Head velocity is getting good reviews lately
wilson.nxt is another good option to try

I would try 16g now though, since 17g is too thin
the fact that its for a 11yo its whats really pulling me away from even considering poly.. to early imo...
 

fjcamry

Semi-Pro
I have my son who is 0.5 yrs younger playing with a 16g kirschbaum multifilament touch at 57lbs on a jr speed racquet. No dampener .


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Sorry, racquet is 2018 Pure Drive Lite.

Thanks, Hansen! Will look at Velocity and Cream. My concern with hybrid strings is it would seem I'd end up having to guess at what variable is causing an effect on how the racquet plays: mains or crosses, which string material, and which string tension. With the fullbed, the only variable is the tension.
Yep ... once you leave fb you have a lot of variables. I decided to try and test any new string fb, and go from there. I hate to hear of kids playing polys (adults for that matter). You have a problem, because breaking the multi 17 in a couple of matches means he his going to break all multis pretty fast. Sure ... velocity probably will last a little longer, but still a problem. You also have an issue that he didn't like going to 16g in same string ... you are so toast. ;)

This is what comes to my mind as a possible. Try fb Cream ... maybe 50-52, and see if it is in the ball park, or rejected. If not rejected, cream/ngr2 is a possible ... and it keeps him closer to what he is used to. There can be supply issues with cream sometimes, but it is a unique poly with good tension maintenance. Read @g4driver posts on his cream/hdx setup ... that is similar and he strings for others that break strings quickly.

Good luck ... post results. Do you have your own stringer? @Traffic could offer input ... his son is older but tried to avoid poly ... but ended up hyper g 17 or 18 I think.
 

esgee48

Legend
Go with 16 Ga multis and drop the tension 4-5#. Your son is primed for a growth spurt and you do not want to damage anything while he is growing. When he starts to fill out with muscle, then think about polyester strings.
 

g4driver

Hall of Fame
My .02 :


when your son does move to full poly keep him away from Cyclone Tour 17 and 18g-- both have awful tension maintenance.

Cyclone Tour 16g on the other hand works wonderful for USTA 4.5C Rated guys who like a softer full poly. It lasts about 3.5 to 4.5 weeks before breaking in 16x19 Pure Drive or 16x20 Pure Control Tour Frames.

Cream 1.28mm mains and either Velocity 1.30 or Technifibre HDX Tour 1.30 is a very soft hybrid with plenty of spin in a Pure Aero. Last me about 15 hours before snapping the crosses. This would be my suggestion after your son graduates from a full bed of multi.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
Hi Folks,

I have an 11 year old who is using Technifibre NRG2 (multi) 17g strings and recently started breaking them every two to three outings. Very expensive! I tried sneaking in - as mains - the same strings in 16g, while keeping the 17g in the crosses. I kept tension the same (52 lbs).

He hated it. He said it felt like a board, but at the same time he said it felt like he couldn't get the same amount of spin.

My first thought was to try tweaking the tension on the 16g main multi. But then I thought of - and read about - the complications of how that affects the crosses. That sounds like another whole can of worms. Asking around, the majority of kids apparently use poly. But reading here, I was very much afraid of injury.

Sorry to bury the lead, but I'm getting there - promise!

Polys are offered in very thin gauges (19 or 20 even for some strings). They are also offered in softer co-poly makeups. Also, generally, lower tensions are used with poly strings.

So...Wouldn't a soft, thinner gauge copoly, strung at lower tension, play equal or softer to a heavier gauge multi (while also lasting longer)?

I will try to load a TW comparison of NRG2 16g and Volkl Cyclone Tour 19g. The stiffness shows equal.

Your much more experienced thoughts would be greatly appreciated!

Ken
Hi Ken, as BBP mentioned, I have an older Jr. He just turned 15. But I probably went through this exercise when he was about 13. He was hitting with a AeroPro Lite at the time. He started to break 16g NXT in 3 weeks and I was a bit alarmed. Then he started breaking in 2 weeks. I started down the poly path and quickly jumped off after researching.

First off, unless you have good access to a stringer (and deep pockets), get a stringing machine. 2ndly, if your Jr is playing tournaments regularly, make sure they have an identical 2nd racquet strung exactly the same. Nothing like being up 1 set and leading the second set 4-2 and then break a string. Then pick up a racquet that plays differently to finish off the match with a loss in the super tie break (this actually happened with my son breaking two strings and borrowing a friend's racquet).

In any case. My knee-jerk reaction is that 11y/o is too early for poly. As @esgee48 pointed out, your jr hasn't hit a growth spurt yet and I wouldn't want any risk of injuries during this sensitive time. If your jr likes how NRG2 plays, then get another racquet or two and have it strung exactly the same and rotate racquets. It seems rather expensive, but if your jr is THAT good, then that's just the price to pay for support.

You could experiment with a 2nd racquet with other strings like Velocity. I'd stay away from NXT as it seems to fray to pieces so quickly but my son enjoyed how it played. You could even try an s-gut like OGSM or Spiraltek.

When I transitioned my son, we strung hybrid with Cyclone/OGSM for a long time. The poly still goes dead, but you actually gain power and lose spin. It's probably a safer safety valve than full bed poly which, when it goes dead, will tend to lose spin and lose power. As it loses power, the player starts to swing harder and try to use more spin technique to keep the ball in play. I think this change contributes to many injuries in adults.

My 11y/o daughter doesn't have the technique to break multi. So she's playing with Alphagut 2000. Probably will restring it every 3-4mos.
My 15y/o son is playing with HyperG 18. He was breaking HG18 every 10-12hrs when he swung a PS97LS. But with his Pure Strike 98, the strings go dead 12-15hrs. We typically always have one racquet strung with fresh strings in his bag. When he starts to get close to the 12th hr, we check his schedule to see if he has a match or tournament coming up to schedule a re-string.

So longevity shouldn't be the first priority when selecting a string. That shouldn't be the driver to switch to poly. Moving to a soft poly will actually require you to string just as frequently because of de-tensioning and the poly going dead. If your jr is breaking strings, then you may need to accept that you have to re-string more frequently. If you don't have a stringing machine at home, then you might need to pick up an extra racquet so that you don't have to run to the stringer in the middle of a tournament.

IF, you must, I would look into gut/poly as a hybrid alternative. It plays like poly in terms of spin production, but maintains its tension better and lasts longer. Getting the right tensions is a bit pricey. But it could pay off in the long run. You can tell your Jr that's what Fed uses...
 
He's 11 years old. Don't put a poly in his racket, not even just in the crosses. Velocity is getting good reviews. If you want something cheaper, get some Genesis XPlosian or ThunderBlast. They seem to be decent multis. Or, something like Prince Syn w Duraflex. You can get that in 18g. See how it lasts.
 

Ken41

New User
THANK YOU EVERYONE for the advice! Sorry couldn't get back sooner. Work...Ugh. And I haven't been able to try anything yet in terms of new strings. He has a tournament this weekend. In fact, right now stringing up another racquet with the NRG2 17g.

So in answer to that, YES, I HAVE A STRINGING MACHINE.

I guess once this weekend is over, my first try will be with the multi in 16g, at a lower tension (Thanks, Esgee48!); mostly because I have a couple sets. I will also try the Cyclone Tour 18g at around 38 lbs since I already ordered it. And keep the third racquet with NRG2 as the control. I'll let you all know what he says about it all!
 

neverstopplaying

Professional
I just saw your thread now. I string for a quite a few competitive juniors and shared a few previous threads with Traffic. From his comments, I switched my 12 y.o son (5'7" 125 lbs and a very hard hitter) over to Hyper G 18 ga. in a Yonex EZone 100. I restring after 12hrs of hitting, regardless of wear, so that he always plays with fresh poly that has not lost its elasticity. Poly on poly slides well, and this string offers good comfort. Hyper G is quite durable even 18ga.
 

DrWang

Rookie
My son currently ranked #1 in Thailand for his age uses a Pure Aero Lite with Volkl V-Torque TOUR 17g @ 52lbs. I use the 18g version in my Pure Drive+ 2018 52/54. This is an amazing string with superb control and spin. It lasts longer than Cyclone tour and I would rate the durability as decent for a soft poly. The power of this string sits between Cyclone Tour and regular Cyclone. My son was using Dunlop Black Widow 17g before moving to this new string and it certainly made a positive difference in his game, especially with regards to control and spin. The strings last about 5-8 days and although he is only nine, he's a heavy hitter and typically competes in the twelve year old division.

With your son's pure drive lite 2018, I'd try the 18g and see how long it lasts. 17g works perfect in my son's Pure Aero Lite. This string is a soft poly and extremely arm friendly. I've had it strung at times at 55-57lbs and it still felt comfortable.

Here's a video of him using the string I suggested.

 

Ken41

New User
Well, the tournament went well. He broke three sets of strings in two days. Haha! But he did well, winning his age group in singles and doubles. It was a small tournament, but still...I won't grumble.

We went out to hit today and he unknowingly tried the thicker gauge 16g of his regular multi strings (NRG2), at 5 lbs less, only in the mains; 17g in crosses at his normal 52 lbs. I started him with his regular racquet with 17g full bed, then after warming up, switched racquets (same frame; different string setup). On trying the other racquet with the "new" strings, he said it felt like his regular strings but with more power. Yay! At least it's close. So I'll try raising the tension in the heavier mains a couple lbs. Even if this setup only lasts 3-4 days...vs 2-3 days, that's still a significant savings. And after reading so much scary stuff about poly and kids, I guess I can afford to spend a little more for a few years.

DwWang your boy is built much sturdier than my son. My son is a little twig, barely 80 lbs. But he hits so hard it makes me worry about the force on his skinny little elbows and shoulders.

***But just to be sure I understand those who are steering me away from poly (for kid): Your view is that softer copoly (as soft as thicker multi, according to TW string numbers), strung 10 lbs lower than the multi, and in a thinner gauge, is still more dangerous in terms of injury than a multi - even if cut out every two weeks. Correct?

Thanks Again, everyone. I really appreciate being able to tap this wealth of experience and knowledge.
 
D

Deleted member 54265

Guest
I copied this article from another thread, Bob does give very good advice.

My son at 11 is a very good junior player. I string his racquet with synth gut (Gosen OG, or Forten) and he likes it a lot and thinks it gives him more power. In my country all juniors just plays poly by default, so I has to sell the idea of a healthy power string to him. I resently found this Kirshbaum Touch Multifibre and it plays very well. I my country almost all junior players use poly by default, I dont think they even know why.

Here is the article:


Collaborative Effort By Bob Patterson:

When it comes to poly strings, we all need to make sure adult recreational players and juniors know the facts. I speak to many manufacturers, coaches, and racquet technicians, and the consensus is that recreational adult players and junior players are using the wrong type of string, tension—or both.

Stiff polyester strings are prevalent in the marketplace and dominate the pro tours, but are they suited for the average club or league player? Most in this industry don’t think so.

First, the very benefit of poly strings is their ability to bend and snap back faster than other materials. This snapback enhances spin on the ball. A pro can swing out and get more spin on the ball while generating a heavier shot. You might think that would be the same for your average junior or club player, but it is most definitely not the case. Most players can’t generate enough racquet-head speed to bend stiff poly strings in the first place. If the string doesn't bend, it can’t snap back, and there is little or no spin enhancement. Many recreational players who switch to a poly never adjust their tension.

I’m always amazed to hear of a 3.5 adult or junior using a full poly set-up at high tensions. This is a surefire way for a player to hurt his or her arm.

Second, monofilament poly strings lose their elasticity—or the ability to snap back—much faster than nylon or other string materials. Since poly strings have a fairly dead feeling, to begin with, their decline is less noticeable for recreational players, who tend to not restring as often as they should, which only makes the problem worse.

Not only is poly string wrong for most recreational and junior players, it can be harmful. The stiffer string coupled with stiffer, lighter racquet creates much more shock to the player when the ball impacts the stringbed. In recent years, we’ve seen arm and wrist injuries sideline many top pros, and these athletes train and take every precaution to prevent injury. If we all know it is a problem, how do we fix it?

It starts with education: inform players about why they should alter their string set-up. It is better for their health and for their game. Manufacturers need to step up, too. It is easy to market a string their top sponsored player is using, but companies need to make rec players aware that string may not be best for everyone. Then they need to offer a softer, better-suited string.

The bottom line is that we all need to address this issue. Injured players play less, and may stop playing altogether.

And that’s not good for anyone. •

Bob Patterson:
Executive Director of
the U.S. Racquet Stringers Association.
Tennis Industry: Nov/Dec 2017
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
My son currently ranked #1 in Thailand for his age uses a Pure Aero Lite with Volkl V-Torque TOUR 17g @ 52lbs. I use the 18g version in my Pure Drive+ 2018 52/54. This is an amazing string with superb control and spin. It lasts longer than Cyclone tour and I would rate the durability as decent for a soft poly. The power of this string sits between Cyclone Tour and regular Cyclone. My son was using Dunlop Black Widow 17g before moving to this new string and it certainly made a positive difference in his game, especially with regards to control and spin. The strings last about 5-8 days and although he is only nine, he's a heavy hitter and typically competes in the twelve year old division.

With your son's pure drive lite 2018, I'd try the 18g and see how long it lasts. 17g works perfect in my son's Pure Aero Lite. This string is a soft poly and extremely arm friendly. I've had it strung at times at 55-57lbs and it still felt comfortable.

Here's a video of him using the string I suggested.

Good looking FH and kid. :D There must be more motorcycles than players at those courts.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
***But just to be sure I understand those who are steering me away from poly (for kid): Your view is that softer copoly (as soft as thicker multi, according to TW string numbers), strung 10 lbs lower than the multi, and in a thinner gauge, is still more dangerous in terms of injury than a multi - even if cut out every two weeks. Correct?
Glad to hear your son survived the tournament with only 2 broken strings. Hopefully you had a day or two in there to get his inventory back up for the next match.

One thing you may start tracking is not how many weeks of play but how many hours of play. During my son's HS tennis season, he was breaking strings (poly) every 8-12hrs. That could translate to less than a week. (oh, and the poly broke due to notching. Not like a super hard hit and popped new strings or anything.

Another tool you can start using is Racquet Tune to track tension and tension loss.
 

DrWang

Rookie
Good looking FH and kid. :D There must be more motorcycles than players at those courts.
Thank you! Hah hah. Yes...lots of Motorcycles in Thailand. They are every where! I'm amazed how these young kids can swing like that effortlessly. They seem to pick up the technique and form so easily. I wish I could swing like that.

I found this cool program called "Pro Show Gold," which allows you to create shows like that video I linked. Lots of fun for the kids. I just picked up a new camera (Nikon D850) so I've been experimenting with the slow-motion video recording. It's also great for looking closely at form and technique for corrections. Here's another one I just created using that program. Okay, I'm showing off a bit here. Just very proud of my son. :)



Well, the tournament went well. He broke three sets of strings in two days. Haha! But he did well, winning his age group in singles and doubles. It was a small tournament, but still...I won't grumble.

We went out to hit today and he unknowingly tried the thicker gauge 16g of his regular multi strings (NRG2), at 5 lbs less, only in the mains; 17g in crosses at his normal 52 lbs. I started him with his regular racquet with 17g full bed, then after warming up, switched racquets (same frame; different string setup). On trying the other racquet with the "new" strings, he said it felt like his regular strings but with more power. Yay! At least it's close. So I'll try raising the tension in the heavier mains a couple lbs. Even if this setup only lasts 3-4 days...vs 2-3 days, that's still a significant savings. And after reading so much scary stuff about poly and kids, I guess I can afford to spend a little more for a few years.

DwWang your boy is built much sturdier than my son. My son is a little twig, barely 80 lbs. But he hits so hard it makes me worry about the force on his skinny little elbows and shoulders.

***But just to be sure I understand those who are steering me away from poly (for kid): Your view is that softer copoly (as soft as thicker multi, according to TW string numbers), strung 10 lbs lower than the multi, and in a thinner gauge, is still more dangerous in terms of injury than a multi - even if cut out every two weeks. Correct?

Thanks Again, everyone. I really appreciate being able to tap this wealth of experience and knowledge.
Grats on your son's win! The article posted above is good, but there is a whole lot more that isn't mentioned. For example, he doesn't differentiate between soft polys and hard polys, and there is a difference there along with string tension and even use of a dampener.

Second, things like racquet stiffness, weight, and Form/technique also come into play. My son cannot play with a regular poly and only uses soft polys like the Volkl V-Torque Tour 17g. Others he has used with success and NO arm issues are, Black Widow 17g and Tour Bite SOFT 17g. I disagree with the statement made about, "better for their game." That's not always true, and in fact, I'd say it all depends on the individual. My son tried several gut hybrids, Multi/Hybrids, etc. NONE of which gave him the playability that he gets with a good soft poly. The Gut hybrid was the worst for him and offered the least bit of control, spraying balls every where (also lack of spin potential). Arm friendly? For sure, but at the cost of losing the match. So for my son, it wasn't better for his game and I doubt it had little, if any, impact on his health vs a soft poly.
 
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ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
Thank you! Hah hah. Yes...lots of Motorcycles in Thailand. They are every where! I'm amazed how these young kids can swing like that effortlessly. They seem to pick up the technique and form so easily. I wish I could swing like that.

I found this cool program called "Pro Show Gold," which allows you to create shows like that video I linked. Lots of fun for the kids. I just picked up a new camera (Nikon D850) so I've been experimenting with the slow-motion video recording. It's also great for looking closely at form and technique for corrections. Here's another one I just created using that program. Okay, I'm showing off a bit here. Just very proud of my son. :)





Grats on your son's win! The article posted above is good, but there is a whole lot more that isn't mentioned. For example, he doesn't differentiate between soft polys and hard polys, and there is a difference there along with string tension and even use of a dampener.

Second, things like racquet stiffness, weight, and Form/technique also come into play. My son cannot play with a regular poly and only uses soft polys like the Volkl V-Torque Tour 17g. Others he has used with success and NO arm issues are, Black Widow 17g and Tour Bite SOFT 17g. I disagree with the statement made about, "better for their game." That's not always true, and in fact, I'd say it all depends on the individual. My son tried several gut hybrids, Multi/Hybrids, etc. NONE of which gave him the playability that he gets with a good soft poly. The Gut hybrid was the worst for him and offered the least bit of control, spraying balls every where (also lack of spin potential). Arm friendly? For sure, but at the cost of losing the match. So for my son, it wasn't better for his game and I doubt it had little, if any, impact on his health vs a soft poly.
Son already has swagger ... I love it. Good video ... dad will have video swagger. :D Maybe if I put my old guy ball machine sessions to music my groundstrokes would look better.
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
Thin poly makes sense but I would suggest trying it in a hybrid rather than a full bed and testing the durability. You may even be able to go thin poly main with thicker NRG2 cross and lower the tension on both. I'm currently playing 20g HyperG mains with 16g Vanquish crosses at 46. The poly will still outlast the multi at a 3.5-4.0 playing level.
 

Ken41

New User
Hi All,

Traffic, good point. He usually will notch and fray strings around sweet spot, then break a main just above center. He’s breaking strings every 3-4 hrs of play. He only plays about 7 hrs most weeks.

Thanks Toby14 for the article. And yes, DrWang, I notice that some or most writings on the subject were written a while ago which, I’m guessing, was before copoly.

Thanks again everyone! Will keep you posted!

Ken
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
Hi All,

Traffic, good point. He usually will notch and fray strings around sweet spot, then break a main just above center. He’s breaking strings every 3-4 hrs of play. He only plays about 7 hrs most weeks.

Thanks Toby14 for the article. And yes, DrWang, I notice that some or most writings on the subject were written a while ago which, I’m guessing, was before copoly.

Thanks again everyone! Will keep you posted!

Ken
You can try hybriding with a round, slick poly cross. This should help the mains last a little longer. Might provide him with a little more spin too.
If you want to stay with softer strings, I've tried OGSM(sgut) crossed with Velocity(low powered multi). It provided more spin than OGSM full bed and offered good control. The slicker cross won't cut through the mains as quickly.
 

Ken41

New User
And yes, DrWang, now that I'm home and reading that article again, he is talking about 1) stiff poly; 2) high tension; and 3) not changing strings often enough. The very stuff I would avoid. I agree with everything he says, but I don't think it really speaks to my question/situation.

Also talked to one of my son's coaches today. He coaches the state's top boys high school team. I told him how often we're breaking multi strings. He said he thinks even though my son is small, he is loading hard and well enough to start using thinner, soft poly. And he said if I want to be cautious, to start with - as many here have suggested - a poly/multi hybrid at lower tension.

More food for thought. I'm overeating. Hah! Seriously, though...starting to feel like I'm overthinking this.

Ok. Next I'll try Velocity 16g full bed around 48 lbs to start. Then a thin, soft poly as mains starting 40 lbs, and Velocity as cross starting at 50 lbs.

It's beer-thirty o'clock.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
And yes, DrWang, now that I'm home and reading that article again, he is talking about 1) stiff poly; 2) high tension; and 3) not changing strings often enough. The very stuff I would avoid. I agree with everything he says, but I don't think it really speaks to my question/situation.

Also talked to one of my son's coaches today. He coaches the state's top boys high school team. I told him how often we're breaking multi strings. He said he thinks even though my son is small, he is loading hard and well enough to start using thinner, soft poly. And he said if I want to be cautious, to start with - as many here have suggested - a poly/multi hybrid at lower tension.

More food for thought. I'm overeating. Hah! Seriously, though...starting to feel like I'm overthinking this.

Ok. Next I'll try Velocity 16g full bed around 48 lbs to start. Then a thin, soft poly as mains starting 40 lbs, and Velocity as cross starting at 50 lbs.

It's beer-thirty o'clock.
FYI ... my bet is your son breaks all fb multi too fast, but you might try tf HDX Tour before Velocity. Both are durable for a multi, but hdx even more so. It has some poly in it, but still pretty arm friendly. If hdx breaks too fast, it would tell you are probably past multi mains. I just switched from fb velocity to hdx/velocity after trying fb hdx. It's a comfortable, fairly good spin setup.

I have never played NGR2, but 52# sounds low for someone swinging fast enough to break strings. I play hdx at mid-tension (55) and Velocity at 52 to give you some reference. Based on your son's ngr2 52, equal Velocity probably 48-50, hdx 50ish.
 

DrWang

Rookie
And yes, DrWang, now that I'm home and reading that article again, he is talking about 1) stiff poly; 2) high tension; and 3) not changing strings often enough. The very stuff I would avoid. I agree with everything he says, but I don't think it really speaks to my question/situation.

Also talked to one of my son's coaches today. He coaches the state's top boys high school team. I told him how often we're breaking multi strings. He said he thinks even though my son is small, he is loading hard and well enough to start using thinner, soft poly. And he said if I want to be cautious, to start with - as many here have suggested - a poly/multi hybrid at lower tension.

More food for thought. I'm overeating. Hah! Seriously, though...starting to feel like I'm overthinking this.

Ok. Next I'll try Velocity 16g full bed around 48 lbs to start. Then a thin, soft poly as mains starting 40 lbs, and Velocity as cross starting at 50 lbs.

It's beer-thirty o'clock.
Beer Thirty. I like that time. lol.
 
Technifibre also makes DuraMix in 17g. It might suit the bill. It's $13.95/set at TW. It's a multi with some poly thrown in to make it last longer I think. Also, Wilson has NXT Control, which is made with the same idea. Maybe one of these would work before going all out poly.
 

coachrick

Hall of Fame
Hi All,

Traffic, good point. He usually will notch and fray strings around sweet spot, then break a main just above center. He’s breaking strings every 3-4 hrs of play. He only plays about 7 hrs most weeks.

Ken
Good on ya for the limited court time! Might be a little light; but I used to cringe when I saw kids putting in 7 hours of court time some DAYS !!!
 

Ken41

New User
Thanks! Will look at HDX Tour, DuraMix and NXT Control too.

And CoachRick, yeah, so far we rarely worry about too much tennis per week. He also does one weekly physical training day (body-weight anaerobic type stuff, mostly), and one day of golf (!). So, with school, homework, and sports, there's just not enough time during the week to overtrain. And on the weekends, when there's no matches, we like to let him just be "bored," and be a kid (fishing, surfing, fun reading, an occasional movie, an hour on his Nintendo Switch).
 

LOBALOT

Professional
My son also is a competitive junior player. What I can't believe I see are stiff strings paired with stiff racquets with these kids. We were at a tournament in another state and my son was playing this boy who was hitting with a Babolat Pure Aero with Hyper G. After every point the kid was shaking his hand/wrist. We saw him at the next tournament and there he was again shaking his hand/wrist after every point. I imagine he practices 4 or 5 times a week and then heads out to tournaments on the weekend and plays 8 hours or so of tournament tennis all with the setup. I really felt bad for the kid.
 

pvw_tf

Rookie
Also talked to one of my son's coaches today. He coaches the state's top boys high school team. I told him how often we're breaking multi strings. He said he thinks even though my son is small, he is loading hard and well enough to start using thinner, soft poly. And he said if I want to be cautious, to start with - as many here have suggested - a poly/multi hybrid at lower tension.

More food for thought. I'm overeating. Hah! Seriously, though...starting to feel like I'm overthinking this.
Stay away from poly for juniors. For sure 11 years old. They are just not strong enough to play with and secondly they can not play with it in the optimum way. Poly what ever indication they give to it that it is soft, even thin is always stiffer then a good multi string. Poly dies after a few hours of play. If you do not play with it soon after stringing is looses tension too. And most poly's considerable. Going 17 or 18 poly's does not help. It will break fairly quickly too. There are always remarks this type of string less then others. But it is just less.

There are very good multies available in thicker gauges. 1.35 and 1.4, will you son notice it. Yes. But only for a short while. But he will still get the control, bigger sweet spot at higher tensions. What he likes you have to sort out.
First NRg2 is available in 1.32. It will last longer. You could opt for putting in string savers, that works well if he breaks the length strings. Will give 30 tot 50% extra play time.

Else take a look at Tecnifibre Duramix. Available in 1.3, 1.35 and 1.4. But not in the states, but you will be able to buy it in Europa. There is also tecnifibre TGV and also goes up to 1.4. And there are more multi string available. But considering he is playing with Nrg2 is maybe the easiest to stay in that type of string.

When he is past growth and playing many hours, you can consider going to a hybrid.

Peter
 

Ken41

New User
Hi All! Sorry it's been so long but the string adventure was put on hold by, well, Life. The tournaments were finally done. I was so excited to try the different strings and combos we talked about!

Then my wife noticed that my son would shake his arms out occasionally on the court and rub his elbow. And he was still using multis! When queried, he'd deny any pain. Pressed on why he was shaking his arms and grabbing his elbow, his answer was, "I dunno." Some guess he was copying some older kids and adults he sees.

Oh well...Better to err on the side of safety. So we let him use the remaining multis (which was kinda quick since he was breaking em every 2-3 hrs, or 1-2 days). Then, at another parent's suggestion (he's a former college player and worried about poly for his kid) - and hearing about it on this forum - we tried Technifibre HDX which is 33% poly. It was an improvement, lasting 3-4 days of play. And the boy gave it a glowing typical 11 year old review of anything: "Meh." But he was hitting the ball harder (from growing) and with a little more spin (maybe some from strings?). I thought we were set.

But now he's breaking the HDX every 3-4 HOURS. Squirt grew almost two inches in the last two months. He rarely grabs his elbow any more and still denies any pain.

So...Maybe later this summer, we'll try the soft poly/multi hybrid.

Positive Side Note: My stringing skills are improving!
 

junior74

G.O.A.T.
Have you tried Head Rip Control? It's a firm multi, great spin - and lasts longer than most multis at half the price of HDX.

When you say 2-3 hours, I assume this is "hitting", not match play?

I've tried a lot of strings, and I've had TE. The softest poly I've ever tried is Gosen Sidewinder.

If you decide to go for poly mains, I'd consider Monogut Zyex cross. It's as soft as gut, but super slick. So you get a "full poly" feel, with comfort.

Good luck, @Ken41 nice to see you don't put poly in his frame just for the sake of durability :)
 
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