New Tennis Court Issues for Covid 19?

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.

"The CDC updated its website on Friday amid a debate among scientists on whether the coronavirus is airborne. It states the virus can be passed on "through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes."

Before, the CDC said the germ could pass "through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks."

The CDC now says: "These particles can be inhaled into the nose, mouth, airways, and lungs and cause infection. This is thought to be the main way the virus spreads."

The current rules for tennis courts should have to be modified.
 
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user92626

G.O.A.T.
A bunch of us have been playing since reopen date June something. Only one old man has dropped off after a month but he really sucked and lost all the time. So, not sure why his disappearance.
 

WildVolley

Legend
...

The current rules for tennis courts should have to be modified.
Unless you have evidence of outdoor spread through tennis, it isn't right to advocate the shutdown of tennis. There is evidence that outdoor exercise and vitamin D are helpful against respiratory diseases. Tennis is a great way to get exercise outdoors in the sun.

We've had an active tennis scene here since May and we haven't had any evidence of spread.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
we've had about 4 cases at our tennis club since it opened, all contracted outside of the club and no evidence of transmission within the club to other members. That's a club of about 1000 playing members. We've been open since late May. And we have indoor hardcourts, so it hasn't been just outdoor tennis going on. We also re-opened badminton and squash where distancing is even harder. No cases there either.

The virus mostly is transmitted through close contact mostly indoors. Tennis is never that close provided you don't high five and shake hands.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
we've had about 4 cases at our tennis club since it opened, all contracted outside of the club and no evidence of transmission within the club to other members. That's a club of about 1000 playing members. We've been open since late May. And we have indoor hardcourts, so it hasn't been just outdoor tennis going on. We also re-opened badminton and squash where distancing is even harder. No cases there either.

The virus mostly is transmitted through close contact mostly indoors. Tennis is never that close provided you don't high five and shake hands.
Yes no cases at all at my club since it reopened. But now some guys have started socializing in the patio during intramural league on Saturdays. They wear masks and/or sit several feet apart, though.
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
Unless you have evidence of outdoor spread through tennis, it isn't right to advocate the shutdown of tennis. There is evidence that outdoor exercise and vitamin D are helpful against respiratory diseases. Tennis is a great way to get exercise outdoors in the sun.

We've had an active tennis scene here since May and we haven't had any evidence of spread.
I did not advocate the shut down of tennis.

Whether aerosol or not is a very important issue that everyone should be fully informed about. 6', surgical masks and other advice for aerosols?

In my county, about 2% of the population has had confirmed Covid 19 cases. That 2% is about the same as for the USA overall. You can research the confirmed case number for your county and get an idea of how much virus has been around in your area since the start. More informative for the amount of virus around is to get the confirmed cases in your community or city. Apply various doubling times to 2%............................
 
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Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
I'm not really seeing a difference between the 'old' and the 'new' cdc info you posted...
Virus transmission of Covid 19 by aerosols have been down played for some reason. Masks shortages were mentions early, but now several months later............?

These things are very well known by scientists. Written for Ebola.

Small particles, such as cigarette smoke, stay in the air for very long times as this illustrates. On the other hand, larger particles, >100 um diameter (density of water), fall to the ground and do not float around in the air for the long times shown. The ones that float in the air for long times are difficult to deal with, more dangerous and are called aerosols.


For some reason, early in the pandemic, it was said that particles in this size range, <5 um, were not significant and seem to have been ignored in the rationale for advice.

Scientists recently started disagreeing on the issue of downplaying the aerosols, and 200 of them wrote a statement to WHO.

Finally, the CDC website mentioned aerosols as important. Then 3 days later after the news picked it up, the CDC has changed their message again. ?

The internet has much better information on aerosols and other well established basics than we can go over again here.

We should wind this thread down with the advice to pay attention to what is going on with this issue on your own.
 
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