New to Stringing, need some tips

dolphinsrus

Rookie
Hi guys,
I just ordered a gamma X-2 stringer, and I am excited about stringing my own racquets. It will be my first time and don't know exactly what to expect. I would appreciate some tips as which videos to watch before starting, should I practice with a cheap string and then cut it? or do you think I can get perfect results on my first job, so I can use my favorite string? Should I string it to my desire tension, or a bit higher in case I lose dome tension while stringing? How accurate is the tension on this machines? I am planning on stringing one Hybrid (poly+Multi) and one racquet with a full bed of multi.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Regular string, regular tension. Use Parnell knots and two piece stringing. String one ahead and fan the crosses through the mains while you're pulling so you don't burn the strings. Plan on talking at least a couple of hours to string your racket.
 

Chotobaka

Hall of Fame
YULitle was a long-time contributor here at TT and left a number of very helpful vid's.

http://www.youtube.com/user/YULitle/videos

Stringing is not rocket science. You have a perfectly capable machine and with some practice will be just fine. I would recommend starting out with decent syn gut and play with it before moving on to $$$ strings. You can experiment to your heart's content without breaking the bank. Good luck.
 

bradfordt

New User
+1 for the YULitle vids.

there are also vids on youtube by Almerick So that i found to be useful in my early days with the same stringer. at the time they were about the only ones i could find that specifically showed the x-2 in use. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJxLaRXDkZw

the x-2 should come with a few sets of string. use the low end strings to learn the whole stringing process, AND to get a feel for what your racquet plays like with that string at that tension. play with it some, then cut it out and try another string.
each time you string, try to be consistent with the overall stringing process, but feel free to adjust the tension up or down to see what effect it has. once you've practiced on the cheap string, THEN go with your favorite string.
 

camohommed

New User
Regular string, regular tension. Use Parnell knots and two piece stringing. String one ahead and fan the crosses through the mains while you're pulling so you don't burn the strings. Plan on talking at least a couple of hours to string your racket.
I fully endorse exactly what Irvin said. I played with the first racket I strung myself. Once you play with it then you can figure out what adjustments in string/tension you want to try next. Have fun.
 

esgee48

Legend
You don't need to prestretch strings anymore. Only time you would do it is to remove coil memory or to reduce elasticity to reduce tension loss.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Great advice from others so far. To build on it, and before I get into pre-stretching, I would recommend 3 things:

1. Buy yourself a starting clamp - they are way too useful not to have one

2. If possible, befriend an experienced stringer and hang out with them. Watch them string. I'm lucky enough to know a certified Master Racquet Technician in town, and time spent with him has been invaluable.

3. Consider a USRSA (United States Racquet Stringers Association) membership. Having USRSA stringing pattern manuals has gotten me out of a jam more than a few times.

Pre-stretching is a controversial technique to mitigate tension loss, and to reduce the coil memory of string. Some do it religiously, some not at all. I myself rarely do it, unless a customer requests it. There are many methods. I wrap the string around a round support beam in my house (protected by a soft cloth). Once I've found the midpoint, I have 2 equal lengths of string - one in my right hand, and one in my left. I use my body weight to lean, pulling both ends of the string against the beam. There really isn't a set amount of force or time to live by - it's a feel thing, I suppose. The danger of over-stretching is to remove all elasticity of the string, often causing the resulting string bed to feel dead.

Above all, focus on developing good habits, solid technique, and consistency. Speed will come - don't force it. As Irvin said, expect to spend a couple hours stringing your first racquet.
 

pmata814

Professional
This will seem trivial but...I recommend you use 17ga synthetic gut for your first attempt. Much easier to work with. I recall using some of the free string that was included with my machine when I first started and it happened to be 15 gauge nylon. Very frustrating to fit through the grommets and blocked holes.
 
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