New USTA Mid-Atlantic Campus

McLovin

Legend
Prince William County, Va. – Feb. 7, 2018 — The United States Tennis Association Mid-Atlantic Section (USTA MAS) announced it will move its headquarters to Prince William County, Va., and create a new home of Mid-Atlantic tennis in the community. USTA Mid-Atlantic, with a mission to promote and develop the growth of tennis, is pursuing development of a tennis complex to help support local players, pave the way for growth of the game and introduce the sport to the next generation of tennis players in the region.

See https://www.usta.com/en/home/stay-current/midatlantic/Mid-Atlantic-Selects-Prince-William-County.html

I'm a bit torn on this. On the positive side, its highly likely I will not have to drive to VA Beach every summer for Districts. It will also (hopefully) increase the league options for us. Currently we have to field a 'dummy' 4.5 team to play in order to advance to Districts. My other option is to drive 25-30 miles towards DC and play at odd hours.

But on the negative side...it will likely pull juniors away from my club, and the junior program is one of the biggest money makers as USTA leagues have already ruined the 'local club' scene in this area.

No word on number/type of courts, indoor facilities, whether PlaySight will be installed, etc.
 

Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
Hard to imagine they wouldn’t have an extensive indoor facility and play sight. While the majority of tour level tennis is outside, of course, there is still a large chunk of it that is indoors and the Americans need an indoor training facility with fast courts. Plus, in mid-Atlantic out door courts would be unusable for training 6 months a year.
 

McLovin

Legend
Hard to imagine they wouldn’t have an extensive indoor facility and play sight. While the majority of tour level tennis is outside, of course, there is still a large chunk of it that is indoors and the Americans need an indoor training facility with fast courts. Plus, in mid-Atlantic out door courts would be unusable for training 6 months a year.
Yes, I guess I was unclear in my initial post. What I meant by 'indoor facilities' was how many indoor courts, if they'll have specific ones for 10 & under indoor, or multi-lined, pickleball courts, a gym, etc.
 
What USTA misses about "growing the game" is that many if not most tennis players came out of families that played tennis together. USTA is adopting the old failed Soviet system, of cherry picking "elite" physical specimens, then sending them off to academies. Currently it doesn't seem that system is working so well for the Ruskies--lots of failures on the drug testing side of things. The US women's gymnastics program just collapsed due to the scandal by their "kiniseo-doc"--seems the families may have been better equipped to care for their children then "THE ORGANIZATION"--which just resigned enmasse.

BTW, in the interest of Grand Slam "player development", how many grass courts and red clay courts will there be in preparation for Americans winning at Roland Garos and Wimby? Building acres of courts doesn't necessarily translate to creating champions--there's lots of courts going empty especially at schools. Maybe USTA has to look into "coaching development".
 
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RickGoulet

New User
I'm wondering how they will pay for it. I hope they don't plan to raise the fees they already charge. With the Four Seasons closing we will be losing 14 indoor courts so we could really use some replacement courts.

More info (including a pic of location):
http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/3649353
 
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Bluefan75

Professional
Just the Executive Director.

ED of USTA Mid-Atlantic only makes about $180k.
Only. I'd really love to hear the actual business case to support paying that salary, other than all the covers the non-profit designation provides.
 

kevrol

Hall of Fame
I'd be curious how Mid-Atlantic is funding this. They are only worth around $3 million and a venture like this in that area won't be cheap.

Southern by comparison is worth about $13 million.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
What USTA misses about "growing the game" is that many if not most tennis players came out of families that played tennis together. USTA is adopting the old failed Soviet system, of cherry picking "elite" physical specimens, then sending them off to academies. Currently it doesn't seem that system is working so well for the Ruskies--lots of failures on the drug testing side of things. The US women's gymnastics program just collapsed due to the scandal by their "kiniseo-doc"--seems the families may have been better equipped to care for their children then "THE ORGANIZATION"--which just resigned enmasse.

BTW, in the interest of Grand Slam "player development", how many grass courts and red clay courts will there be in preparation for Americans winning at Roland Garos and Wimby? Building acres of courts doesn't necessarily translate to creating champions--there's lots of courts going empty especially at schools. Maybe USTA has to look into "coaching development".
USTA doesn't "send" juniors to academies - it offers them access to its own training centers, like the Orlando NTC, which can used in summer or other times. It also doesn't sponsor dorm-like facilities at its training centers. Children who go to academies are mostly sent there by their parents. Some of them may end up getting some help through USTA. Majority of academy juniors have nothing to do with the USTA. So your argument of family vs USTA is a strawman.

The training centers are also places to hold many tournaments. Last week, NCAA tennis was going on in Orlando. They are also places where tennis coaches under USPTA or USPTR can gather. But basically they are places that upcoming juniors can go to for short periods of time to face the highest quality of competition.

Some families may be better equipped, but after having known hundreds of parents driving their kids to tennis lessons, most don't even get into a D3 college. Whereas there is a long list of good players who have trained one way or another at IMG or other places.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
The US women's gymnastics program just collapsed due to the scandal by their "kiniseo-doc"--seems the families may have been better equipped to care for their children then "THE ORGANIZATION"--which just resigned enmasse.
Read Agassi's book about his father's involvement in his tennis and you will see that there are many psycho parents.

I have seen so many cases of fathers "coaching" their kids where we had to stop and glare at them as the father became more and more sarcastic and mean as the "lesson" progressed. Also have seen serious shaming talk by parents to juniors after losing a match.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
What USTA misses about "growing the game" is that many if not most tennis players came out of families that played tennis together. USTA is adopting the old failed Soviet system, of cherry picking "elite" physical specimens, then sending them off to academies. Currently it doesn't seem that system is working so well for the Ruskies--lots of failures on the drug testing side of things. The US women's gymnastics program just collapsed due to the scandal by their "kiniseo-doc"--seems the families may have been better equipped to care for their children then "THE ORGANIZATION"--which just resigned enmasse.

BTW, in the interest of Grand Slam "player development", how many grass courts and red clay courts will there be in preparation for Americans winning at Roland Garos and Wimby? Building acres of courts doesn't necessarily translate to creating champions--there's lots of courts going empty especially at schools. Maybe USTA has to look into "coaching development".
The other aspect not openly talked about is the time spent by parents ferrying their kids to lessons and tournaments, which I suppose is what you prefer, ASSUMING that the USTA runs dormitory-based training facilities, which it doesn't. Guess where that time is coming from? Often, other employees in the work place are putting in extra hours to compensate for these parents. Some parents also deliberately choose a less-challenging lower paying job to allow them more time. That is not good for economic productivity, nor for the family when the economy sours. I know one person who works in the same firm as another person who told me she seemed to be coming in early, and rushes out of the office exactly at 2. Obviously, she has negotiated an unambiguous job description which doesn't need any interaction with others during regular hours, but someone else ends up doing the unpleasant work.
 

McLovin

Legend
@McLovin - would you be willing to elaborate on this?
Sure...

<begin SoapBox>

In the DC/VA/MD region, barely anyone I know actually 'belongs' to a club. Instead, they join approx 30 different teams (not an exaggeration), and simply jump from club to club. They arrive 5-10 minutes before their match, pay the $10-15 court fee, play their match, then leave. In many instances, they do not know their opponents, and sometimes do not even know their partners. Additionally, many times they are off to a different club to play for a different league/format once finished.

When we have Virginia Districts, 90% of the people playing 4.0/4.5 (a) are not there representing a 'club' and (b), are on teams from Maryland and DC that will be having Districts in a week or two. So they really have no 'skin in the game' since if they lose here, they'll have one or two more chances to advance with another team.

What I'm referring to is playing at a local club with friends, hanging out for a beer after, seeing friends/neighbors, and simply playing 'for the fun of it'. Then, as a group, you form a team and do your best to get that team to Districts/Sectionals/Nationals/whatever.

Another example is the club tournament. We had one that had taken place every year for almost 30 years, fielding a 20+ Mens A singles draw, a 16+ Ladies A singles draw, and really decent B singles and doubles/mixed doubles draws. Then USTA leagues came around, and the tournament began to suffer because everyone had multiple 4.0/4.5 teams (as mentioned above) that were going to Districts/Sectionals and those dates conflicted w/ the tournament dates. Then we went 2 years without even holding it.

And one last example...every year we hold a couple 'team' events in our area between 3 clubs. One of those 'clubs' isn't really a club, its a recreation area, but they're included because we need a 3rd for this to work. In February we have whats called the 'Mixed Doubles Challenge', where each club fields 8 doubles teams (lines 1-8), and the respective lines play each other (e.g. 1 v 1 v 1). Last year we won it, but it came down to the final 2 matches, mine & my friend's. We won first, and while watching my friend's match I noticed no one from the other clubs were present. Everyone had left to go play their NoVA (Northern VA)/MD/DC USTA match instead of sticking around to cheer their team on. This is supposed to be a social fun event, where people who have known each other for years get together for some fun competition. Had the other team won, it would have been embarrassing as there would have been no one around to accept the trophy.

Is this 100% USTA's fault? No. But I do believe it has been a compelling factor in the decline of the 'club environment' I grew up w/ in Upstate NY, and really, how it was in VA when I first moved here over 20 years ago.

</end SoapBox>
 

McLovin

Legend
So basically McLovin is just mad it's not an elitist country club sport and can now be played by the masses.
lol. I can see how one might take what I said that way, however, you obviously don't know me, because I'm anything but elitist.

Additionally, I would hardly call my club 'a country club'. Sure, we have indoor courts (a whopping 4 of them), and 2 clay courts, but membership is cheap, and its a small family-run business.

But, that is why I qualified it by saying it isn't 100% USTA's fault. I think its great that the sport is expanding, and that many people can play now that couldn't before. But the downside is that the camaraderie that once existed within a club is shrinking.
 

winchestervatennis

Hall of Fame
So basically McLovin is just mad it's not an elitist country club sport and can now be played by the masses.
Thats a pretty narrow view of it. He said hanging around with buddies for a post match beer. Not trading stock tips and talking about their Porsches.

In my opinion a good club has a good social environment that adds to the tennis experience. Its not all about winning and advancing to districts/sectionals/nationals like USTA seems to be trending.
 

McLovin

Legend
I'm just messing with you @McLovin.
Yeah, I figured. That's why I started out my reply w/ 'lol'.

And not that it matters much, but our 'club tournament' was really a 'county tournament'. You didn't have to be a member to play. Only a resident of the county, or a neighboring county, which is how we were able to get good draws.

It was fun, and a huge (free) cookout was provided for players & spectators on the final Sunday.
 

Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
My theory is that much of this is driven by the public availability of the online rating sites (TR, etc). Everyone wants to play the matches that show up there and make you look better than the others on that list. It’s like posting grades after an exam. Everyone hates it, but secretly loves it.
 

mikeler

Moderator
One of the reasons the USTA was able to build in Orlando is they basically got the land for free. Land is still much cheaper here than that area, so I'll be curious to see how they work that out.

I was clicking on McLovin's link and got down to the last paragraph...and then the garbage USTA redirected me to a page I did not choose. Who runs that thing!
 

silentkman

Semi-Pro
What USTA misses about "growing the game" is that many if not most tennis players came out of families that played tennis together. USTA is adopting the old failed Soviet system, of cherry picking "elite" physical specimens, then sending them off to academies. Currently it doesn't seem that system is working so well for the Ruskies--lots of failures on the drug testing side of things. The US women's gymnastics program just collapsed due to the scandal by their "kiniseo-doc"--seems the families may have been better equipped to care for their children then "THE ORGANIZATION"--which just resigned enmasse.

BTW, in the interest of Grand Slam "player development", how many grass courts and red clay courts will there be in preparation for Americans winning at Roland Garos and Wimby? Building acres of courts doesn't necessarily translate to creating champions--there's lots of courts going empty especially at schools. Maybe USTA has to look into "coaching development".
I totally disagree about your premise of families playing tennis together. it happens, but not that often. Grass courts are difficult, they don't have them at the national campus because it just would not work. In my view, a indoor facility is definitely needed with the closing of four seasons. I hoping the new facility will address this. The good thing is that it will be public. How exactly should training be done?
 

silentkman

Semi-Pro
Sure...

<begin SoapBox>

In the DC/VA/MD region, barely anyone I know actually 'belongs' to a club. Instead, they join approx 30 different teams (not an exaggeration), and simply jump from club to club. They arrive 5-10 minutes before their match, pay the $10-15 court fee, play their match, then leave. In many instances, they do not know their opponents, and sometimes do not even know their partners. Additionally, many times they are off to a different club to play for a different league/format once finished.

When we have Virginia Districts, 90% of the people playing 4.0/4.5 (a) are not there representing a 'club' and (b), are on teams from Maryland and DC that will be having Districts in a week or two. So they really have no 'skin in the game' since if they lose here, they'll have one or two more chances to advance with another team.

What I'm referring to is playing at a local club with friends, hanging out for a beer after, seeing friends/neighbors, and simply playing 'for the fun of it'. Then, as a group, you form a team and do your best to get that team to Districts/Sectionals/Nationals/whatever.

Another example is the club tournament. We had one that had taken place every year for almost 30 years, fielding a 20+ Mens A singles draw, a 16+ Ladies A singles draw, and really decent B singles and doubles/mixed doubles draws. Then USTA leagues came around, and the tournament began to suffer because everyone had multiple 4.0/4.5 teams (as mentioned above) that were going to Districts/Sectionals and those dates conflicted w/ the tournament dates. Then we went 2 years without even holding it.

And one last example...every year we hold a couple 'team' events in our area between 3 clubs. One of those 'clubs' isn't really a club, its a recreation area, but they're included because we need a 3rd for this to work. In February we have whats called the 'Mixed Doubles Challenge', where each club fields 8 doubles teams (lines 1-8), and the respective lines play each other (e.g. 1 v 1 v 1). Last year we won it, but it came down to the final 2 matches, mine & my friend's. We won first, and while watching my friend's match I noticed no one from the other clubs were present. Everyone had left to go play their NoVA (Northern VA)/MD/DC USTA match instead of sticking around to cheer their team on. This is supposed to be a social fun event, where people who have known each other for years get together for some fun competition. Had the other team won, it would have been embarrassing as there would have been no one around to accept the trophy.

Is this 100% USTA's fault? No. But I do believe it has been a compelling factor in the decline of the 'club environment' I grew up w/ in Upstate NY, and really, how it was in VA when I first moved here over 20 years ago.

</end SoapBox>
I agree with all of your points. Tennis is not a team sport. I actually stopped playing league tennis 17 years ago. I was forced into playing on one team this year. I was a member for 4 seasons, but we switched to the Arlington Y (horrible lights). I have much more enjoyment playing tournaments. Tennis can't capture that team spirit of true team sports.
 

Topaz

Legend
Interesting Soapbox thoughts, Mclovin...when I first started playing around here, it was in the outdoor league, 2 hour timed matches for 10 bucks. Ah, the good old days!

I've been on teams that have been like you described...going out after every match, staying together for a few years...it was fun.

I live two blocks from a beautiful club, but there's no way in h*ll I can afford to join it. I take clinics at 4 Seasons and I'm not sure what I'm going to do after it closes. FFX is booked solid now, might look into HP or Mt. Vernon, but yeah...I think the location for this new facility (while not the best for me personally) certain fills a needed gap.

There was a FB post by USTA Mid-Atlantic that answered some of the questions you posted here...maybe look that up? I do remember there will be indoor and outdoor courts. My god, would be so nice to not have to travel for every single regionals (not that I go to them so much anymore).
 

Angle Queen

Professional
Sure...

<begin SoapBox>

In the DC/VA/MD region, barely anyone I know actually 'belongs' to a club. Instead, they join approx 30 different teams (not an exaggeration), and simply jump from club to club. They arrive 5-10 minutes before their match, pay the $10-15 court fee, play their match, then leave. In many instances, they do not know their opponents, and sometimes do not even know their partners. Additionally, many times they are off to a different club to play for a different league/format once finished.

...

</end SoapBox>
Yep. The Metro DC area operates quite differently than the rest of VA...and not just when it comes to tennis. :p

Here in Richmond, it's almost the exact opposite. The clubs and HOAs drive the USTA leagues; it's the rare division with an "independent" team (usually run out of a county facility...which we are extraordinarily lucky to have many of!!). And it's the clubs that set their own rules on who can play on their teams. Our club only allows members unless they could otherwise not field a team (like say a 4.5W or 5.0M) and even then the "guest" can only do it once. Other clubs are a bit more relaxed as are the HOA-based ones. I will say we have clubs of all types, from the most basic to the highest of the high end. Our club is in the middle of the pack, actually the redneck/camo-wearing/pickup-driving bunch from the boondocks. At least according to some. LOL.

It is part of the reason you don't/won't see too many Richmond teams make it to Sectionals...unless it's one of those independent/all-star type teams. I used to complain (even here on TT) about the team-jumping up there but have come to realize I much prefer our club/neighborhood approach for the long(er) haul. I no longer play USTA (for other reasons) but before doing so I'd played with the same core group for almost 10 years. We still play together socially and I value their comradery.

<begin my own darn rant>

You can bet your favorite racquet that fees are gonna go up. What a racket!

</end rant>
 

silentkman

Semi-Pro
Yep. The Metro DC area operates quite differently than the rest of VA...and not just when it comes to tennis. :p

Here in Richmond, it's almost the exact opposite. The clubs and HOAs drive the USTA leagues; it's the rare division with an "independent" team (usually run out of a county facility...which we are extraordinarily lucky to have many of!!). And it's the clubs that set their own rules on who can play on their teams. Our club only allows members unless they could otherwise not field a team (like say a 4.5W or 5.0M) and even then the "guest" can only do it once. Other clubs are a bit more relaxed as are the HOA-based ones. I will say we have clubs of all types, from the most basic to the highest of the high end. Our club is in the middle of the pack, actually the redneck/camo-wearing/pickup-driving bunch from the boondocks. At least according to some. LOL.

It is part of the reason you don't/won't see too many Richmond teams make it to Sectionals...unless it's one of those independent/all-star type teams. I used to complain (even here on TT) about the team-jumping up there but have come to realize I much prefer our club/neighborhood approach for the long(er) haul. I no longer play USTA (for other reasons) but before doing so I'd played with the same core group for almost 10 years. We still play together socially and I value their comradery.

<begin my own darn rant>

You can bet your favorite racquet that fees are gonna go up. What a racket!

</end rant>
Good Stuff, I have never been a fan of league tennis. In our area, you only have 2-3 teams which obviously increases your chances of making sectionals. I have always believed that teams in the larger areas are slighted because you have 1 out of 10 teams that make it. Obviously, teams in my area have no chance to go any further than sectionals. I do know players that have come to our area just so that they can play sectionals.
 

OrangePower

Legend
Good Stuff, I have never been a fan of league tennis. In our area, you only have 2-3 teams which obviously increases your chances of making sectionals. I have always believed that teams in the larger areas are slighted because you have 1 out of 10 teams that make it. Obviously, teams in my area have no chance to go any further than sectionals. I do know players that have come to our area just so that they can play sectionals.
In Norcal a 1 out of 10 chance for Sectionals is but a dream!

For example 4.0 is the most populous league here... last year there were a total of 182 men's teams for Adult 18 and over 4.0.
Sectionals was the top 8 teams. So 1 out of 23.

3.5 had 'only' 147 teams, but only top 4 represented in Sectionals.
So odds even worse, at 1 in 37.

4.5 had 102 teams with 4 Sectionals spots, so 1 out of 26.

I play 4.5 and have made it to sectionals exactly once. I doubt it will happen again since only purpose-built 'superteams' really have a chance to get that far.
 
I totally disagree about your premise of families playing tennis together. it happens, but not that often.
You disagree--but present NO evidence for your opinion. I can give a slew of evidence for my opinion--but will not waste my time. It is incumbent on YOU to state evidence for why you "totally disagree". I will give one bit of evidence--look at the sorry state of US players in the finals of men's grand slams. Building hundreds of courts does not translate into building champions--there are hundreds of empty courts across America, especially at public schools. You don't build champions by solely constructing tennis courts.
 
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Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
I do know players that have come to our area just so that they can play sectionals.
That is one thing that USTA provides that local club based leagues do not - the ability to play people from other sections and even their parts of the country via sectionals, regionals, nationals, etc.
 

McLovin

Legend
@tennis tom, I may be in the minority, but I can tell you that:
  • both my parents play
  • both me & my wife play
  • my oldest daughter plays, as does her boyfriend.
In fact...my oldest has an interview this afternoon w/ the USTA National Campus in Orlando for a tech summer internship (she plays club tennis at FSU). So while I may be on the fence about the new campus in Manassas, I am grateful for the job opportunities the facilities present (so long as she gets the internship :) ).
 

OrangePower

Legend
Easily fixed. Get bumped down to 4.0 and you will recruited to the best NorCal 4.0 teams and be a fixture at nationals.
That is the only reason I frequent these forums - to pick up tips on how to tank down to 4.0, and then how to sandbag and manage my rating effectively once that happens.
I am building up my knowledge base and soon I will rule the world muahahahahahahahaha
 

silentkman

Semi-Pro
You disagree--but present NO evidence for your opinion. I can give a slew of evidence for my opinion--but will not waste my time. It is incumbent on YOU to state evidence for why you "totally disagree". I will give one bit of evidence--look at the sorry state of US players in the finals of men's grand slams. Building hundreds of courts does not translate into building champions--there are hundreds of empty courts across America, especially at public schools. You don't build champions by solely constructing tennis courts.
I totally disagree that it is incumbent upon me to provide evidence. i can tell you that I don't see a whole lot of families playing tennis. Honestly, i see some but not a whole lot. The finals of the mens grand slams is a weak argument. using that argument, Switzerland and South Africa are doing better in tennis. and one more thing Bulgarian is a powerhouse. I would go with the top 20. USA has three players in the top 20. Hey may never to get a grand slam, but they are top 20 players which is pretty darn good. The USA will never get the top athletes to play tennis. at this point, I'm content with 3 in the top 20.
 

silentkman

Semi-Pro
@tennis tom, I may be in the minority, but I can tell you that:
  • both my parents play
  • both me & my wife play
  • my oldest daughter plays, as does her boyfriend.
In fact...my oldest has an interview this afternoon w/ the USTA National Campus in Orlando for a tech summer internship (she plays club tennis at FSU). So while I may be on the fence about the new campus in Manassas, I am grateful for the job opportunities the facilities present (so long as she gets the internship :) ).
congrats, please provide an update. attended a 3 day camp there in December, had a great time. My only complaint there was no singles instruction. Open the red clay courts to the Public.
 

silentkman

Semi-Pro
Thanks for proving my argument, all three come from tennis families.
Wow, You take out one sentence to validate your point. Since you appear to know everything, Jack played with brother Eric and I can't any information on John or Sam. The point is elite athletes will never play tennis. Sam's father was a baseball player, so he has something there. I would love to hear your ideas.
 

mikeler

Moderator
congrats, please provide an update. attended a 3 day camp there in December, had a great time. My only complaint there was no singles instruction. Open the red clay courts to the Public.
It is annoying that you can't just pay an extra fee to hit on the red clay. They just need to check people's shoes before going on so that you don't have to worry about them tearing up the court.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Tiafoe and Opelka: both from the Boca Raton USTA training center, not from "family tennis."

Family tennis days are over. Tennis is now a global professional sport with all round skill requirements, not a sport for wimpy kids wearing short shorts. USTA is the way to go.
 

Ft.S

Semi-Pro
What I'm referring to is playing at a local club with friends, hanging out for a beer after, seeing friends/neighbors, and simply playing 'for the fun of it'. Then, as a group, you form a team and do your best to get that team to Districts/Sectionals/Nationals/whatever.
I am having hard time relating to your broader comments. I am one of those who quit the club and play 100% USTA league and few tournaments. The club I was a member of was a pure tennis club with good facilities, and I had maybe a dozen friends where we would play and have a beer afterwards. It was certainly fun to some extent.

I realized few problems however; first was that I kept playing with the same people over and over again, not much competitiveness and no one was improving. It was all about having a social connection and spending time with good group of people. What I wanted was competitive tennis, playing against better and better players for achieving some set objective. The club environment did not offer that, instead I was paying $4-600 every month to be able to play 3-4 times a week, including clinics, match play and occasional club tournaments.

I am grateful for USTA MAS offering various options that we have. My monthly tennis costs went down to about $200, I have now three to four dozen regular players I am in contact with, and we all play competitively, while keeping everything civil. We don't have beers afterwards, most of the time, but we still socialize and have superb fun.

The clubs in our DC Metro area are mostly doing well, they have your type of clientele and I don't think there is anything wrong with it. However, clubs really do not offer any decent adult programs, nor do they care about adults improving or competing, their focus is on juniors whose parents pay $1-1.5K a month for their tennis lessons and coaching, which is understandable.

How can it be USTA's fault if they are offering programs for players like me, and we are many. If clubs want to attract players like me, which they don't, they would change their service and fee structures.
 

silentkman

Semi-Pro
Thank you for your kind words--actually I'm just good at googling.



You are once again RIGHT--Roger Federer would be lucky to make it onto a mixed-curling team.
Stay focus, the discussion was about Americans. Its possible that Roger Federer was born in Minnesota.
 

Topaz

Legend
Tiafoe and Opelka: both from the Boca Raton USTA training center, not from "family tennis."

Family tennis days are over. Tennis is now a global professional sport with all round skill requirements, not a sport for wimpy kids wearing short shorts. USTA is the way to go.
No, Tiafoe grew up around Junior Tennis Champions Center in MD, where his dad worked. That's where he learned tennis and was first discovered and received training.
 

Bluefan75

Professional
USTA, like FIFA and the IOC is corrupt to the core:

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/23/sports/tennis/intersecting-interests-at-the-top-of-us-tennis.html

I don't understand why some of them aren't in jail.
Sure was a lot of spin in there to make it seem like they "took steps to remain impartial."

I find the "there are only a few people" comments quite hilarious. They really mean "there are only a few people who have passed the test and have shown loyalty to the familia and know how to play this game without wrecking it."

If there was no funny business going on, why don't they disclose it up front? Someone also needs to tell the one guy that the appearance of a conflict of interest *is* as a bad as an actual conflict of interest.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
Sure was a lot of spin in there to make it seem like they "took steps to remain impartial."

I find the "there are only a few people" comments quite hilarious. They really mean "there are only a few people who have passed the test and have shown loyalty to the familia and know how to play this game without wrecking it."

If there was no funny business going on, why don't they disclose it up front? Someone also needs to tell the one guy that the appearance of a conflict of interest *is* as a bad as an actual conflict of interest.
It's happening everywhere in the non profits. American Universities have the same professor/lecturer/TA to student ratio as 30 years ago. The number of administrators have gone up exponentially. Many administrators make bigger salary than the professors and the tuition has also gone up exponentially.
 

Bluefan75

Professional
It's happening everywhere in the non profits. American Universities have the same professor/lecturer/TA to student ratio as 30 years ago. The number of administrators have gone up exponentially. Many administrators make bigger salary than the professors and the tuition has also gone up exponentially.
Yep. Up here in Canada(socialized medicine), our local hospital just announced they are closing a cardiac rehab facility. The space is needed for management offices. Yeah sounds like a proper use of funds towards the mandate they were given.
 
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