Non-Cat Lovers....Please unite

Zara

Legend
Yo desperado (or @Mike Bulgakov) - enough with the cat stuff already.

Btw what's the word if you spell dog the other way? That's right.

It's God in dog form on earth and men's best friend, no less. Beat that, suckers!

 

Zara

Legend
Yo Siddhārtha - my beloved Buddha would never hijack my thread let alone insist on cats. He'd live and let live. He'd always maintain to go on about one's own way and would never impose on others. He left the choice on others as it should be.

 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
The spooky history of how cats bewitched us

Fairly or not, cats have become associated with witchcraft. (iStock)

By Abigail Tucker
Oct. 31, 2016 at 5:00 a.m. PDT

Witches have always liked cats. Sure, they’ve been known to hang out with a wide variety of creatures, including lambs, hornets and crabs. But felines are their favorite consorts, according to an academic analysis that tallied up animal “familiars” from 200 historic English witch trials.

Is anybody really surprised? The hags from Macbeth didn’t dunk their “brinded” cat in the cauldron with the newt’s eye and dog tongue – they preferred to keep it alive and meowing. In America’s Salem-era scares, witches made their child victims “purr like so many cats” (which, many parents might concede, is a far more melodious alternative to normal kid noise). Today, cats – especially black ones – still pounce upon us at Halloween time, in costumes and decor.

But why are our cuddly darlings, the most popular pets in America behind freshwater fish, so persistently tied to the occult in myth and history? Superficial feline characteristics can explain some of it. But perhaps the deeper link between house cats and black magic is rooted in the very real powers they have over us.

Objectively speaking, felines are more mysterious in behavior and exotic in looks than most of our other pets and domesticated animals. For one thing, cats are alert and active while we sleep, making them seem more likely to take part in clandestine midnight gatherings. They are also ambush hunters, prone to hiding in odd places and then making sudden, startling movements — especially on dark and stormy nights. Exquisitely sensitive, cats seem to commune with the invisible, precisely because they can see and hear things that humans cannot. Their eyes glow at times, because a mirrorlike structure behind their retinas promotes their night vision.

Yet the glow is not the most unsettling thing about our cats’ eyes. Unlike tigers and jaguars and other big cats, house cats have vertically slit pupils, a common feature among small nocturnal predators that hunt close to the ground. What else has vertically slit pupils and also occasionally hisses? The serpent. And who made his first biblical appearance as a snake?

It’s not clear when Western Christians first picked up on this dark resemblance. While the Bible is full of felines, especially lions and leopards, it excludes house cats except for one iffy mention. In his book “Classical Cats,” the historian Donald W. Engels argues that ancient Egyptian religious traditions – which involved a whole lot of house cats — evolved into Roman-era pagan rituals, which competitive early Christians may have been eager to stamp out.

But it was in the Middle Ages that the tension between cats and Catholics began to escalate. In 1233, Pope Gregory IX’s “Vox in Rama,” a warning against the perils of witchcraft, accused its targets of canoodling with a black cat that was actually Lucifer in disguise. Although the pope also decried frogs and ducks, anti-feline prejudice quickly swept the church. Cats were burned and hurled from bell towers – a practice that is supposedly memorialized today in a bizarre annual festival in Ypres, Belgium. (Now, only stuffed cats are hurled, a reflection of our more humane age.)

Some historians, Engels included, even blame a resulting, continent-wide cat deficit for the subsequent devastation of the Black Death, thought to be spread by rats (though some research suggests cats can transmit plague directly to people). Left in peace, the thinking goes, Europe’s cats might have pounced upon the plague-ridden rodents, saving the lives of tens of millions of people.

Sadly, this idea doesn’t hold much water. Research has shown that cats are reluctant rat-killers at best, and cats that do kill plague-infected rodents often catch the plague themselves — and readily spread it to humans through fleas. It’s also highly unlikely that the ecclesiastical cat assassins, however hellbent, could have killed anywhere near enough cats to alter the Black Death’s trajectory. Cats are almost supernaturally good at surviving: Modern-day governments find it practically impossible to rid even small islands of invasive cat populations, let alone to purge a land mass the size of Europe. (It recently took several years and $3 million to rid one small California island of cats, which were dining on a threatened species of lizard.)

Finally, even at the height of cat-quisition, most medieval Christians probably still liked cats as much as anybody else and safeguarded their favorites from the fanatics. Indeed, Exeter Cathedral in southwest England even had its own cat door. Note that cats are not exactly rare in Europe today – and as the animal behaviorist John Bradshaw writes, black cats, generally thought to be the wickedest ones, are especially numerous in many places, with more than 80 percent of the population carrying black-coat mutations.

But let’s play devil’s advocate here. What if Pope Gregory was actually on to something? He may have had one perfectly sound reason to suspect cats of demonic mischief: allergies. Respiratory reactions to cat dander can be sudden and crippling, as University of Pennsylvania zoologist James Serpell has pointed out. Could this attribute have given the impression that a possessed cat was actually stealing a baby’s breath? In a world of limited medical knowledge, the frightening “hecticks and consumptions” triggered by the feline presence might have seemed downright malevolent.

Good thing most of us no longer believe in magic. Except that recently, scientists did stumble upon another real power of the house cat. Doctors had long known of a mysterious parasite that can cause grave birth defects in human children, but they didn’t know where it came from. It wasn’t until 1969 that scientists realized that this creepy disease, toxoplasmosis, which has likely influenced the human constitution since prehistoric times, was spread exclusively by felines.
In the decades since, the story has gotten even spookier. Human fetuses are not the only ones affected: Toxoplasmosis, some research suggests, also holds sway over healthy adults and has been linked to ailments from obesity to brain cancer to schizophrenia. Some researchers even think that the cat parasite can manipulate human personality and behavior, causing infected people to become “attracted” to cats, and to otherwise be maneuvered by them.

Yet in the years after the first wave of toxoplasmosis coverage, people did not forsake their cats, any more than most medievals did after Pope Gregory’s dire warnings. Indeed, the 1970s were when cats’ popularity as indoor pets began to skyrocket.

Logic has its limits. We prefer to stay under cats’ spell.
Abigail Tucker is the author of “The Lion in the Living Room: How House Cats Tamed Us and Took Over the World.”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2016/10/31/the-spooky-history-of-how-cats-bewitched-us/

 

Zara

Legend
"Most of Europe considers the black cat a symbol of bad luck, particularly if one walks across the path in front of a person, which is believed to be an omen of misfortune and death. In Germany, some believe that black cats crossing a person's path from right to left, is a bad omen."

But as the Wiki says, it varies from culture to culture.


 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
actually..........not bad idea to have some catwalk sporty fashion show btwn 1/2 times instead of boring cheerleaders all the time:-D:-D:-D:-D:-D:-D:-D:-D.......................
I'm a Canadian, you know what I mean
And I do my little turn on the catwalk
Yeah, on the catwalk, yeah, on the catwalk, yeah
I shake my little touche on the catwalk

I'm too sexy for my cat
Too sexy for my cat
Poor pussy, poor pussy cat
I'm too sexy for my love
Too sexy for my love
Love's going to leave me
And I'm too sexy for this song

On the catwalk, Marloes is too sexy for her pussy cat.

 
Last edited:

Genious at Work

Hall of Fame
Okay, so I am sure there will be only a few but still, I want to find out who those are.

Come on, chop! chop!
Cats are very underrated. It's harder to earn their affection than dogs' affection, but when you do they go in deep. A dog will rub against anybody's leg, they are the Paris Hiltons of the animal kingdom, total sluts.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Fat cats: how to get a lazy, obese feline into perfect shape
Pet obesity is a growing problem. Here’s the best way to address any unwelcome kitty weight gain


‘Fat? Me? It’s just my fur coat.’ Photograph: Ian McGlasham/Alamy Stock Photo

When the morbidly obese cat Cinderblock embarked on a weightloss journey two weeks ago, her one-paw-on-the-treadmill efforts to get trim went viral. Since the launch of her Cinder Gets Fit YouTube channel, she has gained 16,000 subscribers and dropped 0.2lb, thanks to her strict diet and exercise regimen. Pet obesity is a growing concern among vets in the UK and is linked to health conditions such as arthritis, diabetes and heart disease. A survey of 2,100 pet owners by Direct Line pet insurance found that, in the past year, more than a million cat owners have been told by vets that their pets are overweight. Now, I have tried to get my cat to exercise more, but if I leave him outside for the day, he does much the same as he would do indoors – sleeps. Cats are notoriously lazy, so what can we do to help them effectively lose weight?

Recognise the signs
A PFMDSA 2018 report last year from the People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals found that 68% of cat owners were unaware that their pet was overweight or obese, so developing an eye for the signs is a good habit to get into. The World Small Animal Veterinary Association scores body condition in cats from 1-9. Ideally, their fat coverage should allow you to feel their ribs with a gentle touch and you should be able to visibly see their waist from above and a slight abdominal tuck from the side. A vet can show you in how to do this.

Get a specialist diet
Getting the diet right early on is key to preventing obesity, according to Daniella Dos Santos, president of the British Veterinary Association. Depending on the breed, size, age and lifestyle of the cat, they will have particular needs. A fully formulated diet accredited by the Pet Food Manufacturers Association is best because it has gone through all the nutritional tests needed for a balanced diet. Dietary control is key, says Dos Santos, as it is easy to end up overfeeding them. “When they’re sleeping they’re not using many calories, so we need to adjust for that in terms of the type and volume of food we’re feeding them.” Regular weight clinics are also an effective way to track progress with your vet and change their diet accordingly.

Limit the treats
“People tend to forget that treats aren’t the best thing for them and they have a calorie count of their own, so they need to be factored in with the rest of their food,” says Dos Santos. As for the infamous table scraps and leftovers? “The calorie requirements for a cat are much lower than for a human,” she adds. “So even foods you would think are very healthy for humans, such as chicken breast, is a huge amount of calories for a cat.”

Make them work for their food
Making your cat work to find their food, using scatter feeding and puzzle feeding is also a good way to get them to be more active. Cats Protection recommends placing some of their daily rations inside feeding balls and encouraging them to exercise by playing with fishing rod toys and light pointers.

If Cinder can do it, so can your cat!
With a well-formulated diet, portion control to suit their lifestyle and daily exercise, all informed by a vet, it should become more manageable to get your cat back to a healthy weight.
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/shortcuts/2019/nov/13/fat-cats-how-to-get-a-lazy-obese-feline-into-perfect-shape
 

TnsGuru

Professional
Fat cats: how to get a lazy, obese feline into perfect shape
Pet obesity is a growing problem. Here’s the best way to address any unwelcome kitty weight gain


‘Fat? Me? It’s just my fur coat.’ Photograph: Ian McGlasham/Alamy Stock Photo

When the morbidly obese cat Cinderblock embarked on a weightloss journey two weeks ago, her one-paw-on-the-treadmill efforts to get trim went viral. Since the launch of her Cinder Gets Fit YouTube channel, she has gained 16,000 subscribers and dropped 0.2lb, thanks to her strict diet and exercise regimen. Pet obesity is a growing concern among vets in the UK and is linked to health conditions such as arthritis, diabetes and heart disease. A survey of 2,100 pet owners by Direct Line pet insurance found that, in the past year, more than a million cat owners have been told by vets that their pets are overweight. Now, I have tried to get my cat to exercise more, but if I leave him outside for the day, he does much the same as he would do indoors – sleeps. Cats are notoriously lazy, so what can we do to help them effectively lose weight?

Recognise the signs
A PFMDSA 2018 report last year from the People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals found that 68% of cat owners were unaware that their pet was overweight or obese, so developing an eye for the signs is a good habit to get into. The World Small Animal Veterinary Association scores body condition in cats from 1-9. Ideally, their fat coverage should allow you to feel their ribs with a gentle touch and you should be able to visibly see their waist from above and a slight abdominal tuck from the side. A vet can show you in how to do this.

Get a specialist diet
Getting the diet right early on is key to preventing obesity, according to Daniella Dos Santos, president of the British Veterinary Association. Depending on the breed, size, age and lifestyle of the cat, they will have particular needs. A fully formulated diet accredited by the Pet Food Manufacturers Association is best because it has gone through all the nutritional tests needed for a balanced diet. Dietary control is key, says Dos Santos, as it is easy to end up overfeeding them. “When they’re sleeping they’re not using many calories, so we need to adjust for that in terms of the type and volume of food we’re feeding them.” Regular weight clinics are also an effective way to track progress with your vet and change their diet accordingly.

Limit the treats
“People tend to forget that treats aren’t the best thing for them and they have a calorie count of their own, so they need to be factored in with the rest of their food,” says Dos Santos. As for the infamous table scraps and leftovers? “The calorie requirements for a cat are much lower than for a human,” she adds. “So even foods you would think are very healthy for humans, such as chicken breast, is a huge amount of calories for a cat.”

Make them work for their food
Making your cat work to find their food, using scatter feeding and puzzle feeding is also a good way to get them to be more active. Cats Protection recommends placing some of their daily rations inside feeding balls and encouraging them to exercise by playing with fishing rod toys and light pointers.

If Cinder can do it, so can your cat!
With a well-formulated diet, portion control to suit their lifestyle and daily exercise, all informed by a vet, it should become more manageable to get your cat back to a healthy weight.
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/shortcuts/2019/nov/13/fat-cats-how-to-get-a-lazy-obese-feline-into-perfect-shape
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
A version of this was posted on this forum a long time ago.



From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 9.26am
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Re: Poster


Dear Shannon,
That is shocking news.
Although I have two clients expecting completed work this afternoon, I will, of course, drop everything and do whatever it takes to facilitate the speedy return of Missy.
Regards, David.

From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 9.37am
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Re: Poster


yeah ok thanks. I know you dont like cats but I am really worried about mine. I have to leave at 1pm today.

From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 10.17am
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Poster


Dear Shannon,
I never said I don’t like cats. Attached poster as requested.
Regards, David.

From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 10.24am
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Poster


yeah thats not what I was looking for at all. it looks like a movie and how come the photo of Missy is so small?

From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 10.28am
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Poster


Dear Shannon,
It’s a design thing. The cat is lost in the negative space.
Regards, David.

From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 10.33am
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Poster


Thats just stupid. Can you do it properly please? I am extremely emotional over this and was up all night in tears. you seem to think it is funny. Can you make the photo bigger please and fix the text and do it in colour please. Thanks.

From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 10.46am
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Poster


Dear Shannon,
Having worked with designers for a few years now, I would have assumed you understood, despite our vague suggestions otherwise, we do not welcome constructive criticism. I don’t come downstairs and tell you how to send text messages, log onto Facebook and look out of the window. I have amended and attached the poster as per your instructions.
Regards, David.


From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 10.59am
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Poster


This is worse than the other one. can you make it so it shows the whole photo of Missy and delete the stupid text that says missing missy off it? I just want it to say Lost.

From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 11.14am
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re:



From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 11.21am
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Poster


yeah can you do the poster or not? I just want a photo and the word lost and the telephone number and when and where she was lost and her name. Not like a movie poster or anything stupid. I have to leave early today. If it was your cat I would help you. Thanks.

From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 11.32am
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Awww


Dear Shannon,
I don’t have a cat. I once agreed to look after a friend’s cat for a week but after he dropped it off at my apartment and explained the concept of kitty litter. I have attached the amended version of your poster as per your detailed instructions.
Regards, David.



From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 11.47am
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Awww


Thats not my cat. where did you get that picture from? That cat is orange. I gave you a photo of my cat.

From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 11.58am
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Re: Re: Awww


I know, but that one is cute. As Missy has quite possibly met any one of several violent ends, it is possible you might get a better cat out of this. If anybody calls and says “I haven’t seen your orange cat but I did find a black and white one with its hind legs run over by a car, do you want it?” you can politely decline and save yourself a costly veterinarian bill.
Regards, David.

From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 12.07pm
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Awww


Please just use the photo I gave you.

From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 12.22pm
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Awww




From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 12.34pm
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Awww


I didnt say there was a reward. I dont have $2000 dollars. What did you even put that there for? Apart from that it is perfect can you please remove the reward bit. Thanks Shan.

From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 12.42pm
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Awww




From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 12.51pm
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Awww


Can you just please take the reward bit off altogether? I have to leave in ten minutes and I still have to make photocopies of it.

From: David Thorne
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 12.56pm
To: Shannon Walkley
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Awww




From: Shannon Walkley
Date: Monday 21 June 2010 1.03pm
To: David Thorne
Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Awww



Fine. That will have to do.


 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Russian's 22-pound cat was too fat to fly. So he called in an understudy.
Anna Schaverien, New York Times


A man who tricked his way into getting his overweight cat into the passenger cabin of a plane has been penalized by a Russian airline.

Aeroflot stripped the passenger, Mikhail Galin, of his air miles and removed him from its frequent-flyer program after he bragged on social media about sneaking his hefty pet onboard by switching him for a lighter cat during check-in.

When airline employees told Galin that his 22-pound cat, Viktor, was simply too heavy to fly in the passenger cabin on a flight to Vladivostok, in eastern Russia, he devised a plan to ensure his kitty did not wind up in the cargo hold.

Galin said in a post on Facebook that he delayed his flight and used air miles to secure a business class seat for himself and Viktor. After asking friends for help, he then sourced a 15-pound feline called Fibi, describing her as an “understudy cat.”

When he presented the slimmer pet at check-in, she came under the airline’s limit of 8 kilograms, or about 17 pounds, for animals flying in the passenger cabin. Galin and Fibi were approved for takeoff.
But unknown to Aeroflot and its staff, Galin swapped Fibi for his real pet, Viktor, before boarding the plane.
Galin, unable to resist the temptation to capture the moment, took photographs and posted them on Facebook and Instagram.

Viktor, a brown cat with black stripes and long white whiskers, was snapped in a pet carrier in front of a glass of what appears to be sparkling wine.
He was also shown being held up to the plane window by Galin, with Aeroflot’s branding clearly visible on the headrest.



Those images eventually played a role in his downfall.

The airline told Agence France-Presse that it opened an investigation after Galin’s post caught their attention, and that it eventually found video surveillance footage of the cat swap at check-in.

“Aeroflot has taken the decision to take this passenger out of its frequent flyer program,” Aeroflot told the news agency. “All of the miles collected during his time in the program will be annulled.”

According to news reports, Galin had nearly 400,000 miles on his account.

Aeroflot did not respond to requests for comment. In a message, Galin confirmed that his frequent flyer account had been blocked and said that he found out about the penalty through news reports.

The story of the cat swap became so widespread in Russia that it was even mentioned Wednesday in a daily call between President Vladimir Putin and Russian journalists.

Putin said that the Kremlin did not comment about cats.

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.
https://www.sfgate.com/news/article/His-22-Pound-Cat-Was-Too-Fat-to-Fly-So-He-Called-14832362.php
http://instagr.am/p/B4g4L1EB_4w/
 
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