Non clean contact and hand discomfort

AnyPUG

Rookie
I'm recovering from an injury and 2 months off from serving, whenever I hit a serve without a clean contact (mainly because of bad toss or messed up timing), my serving hand feels a discomfort that lasts around 10 seconds.
How do you eliminate/reduce hits with bad contact? In the short term, I can take a break from hitting serves until the strength is completely back.
But in the long run, it appears that I'm going to put strain on my hand/wrist/arm etc whenever I fail to make a clean contact. (even though I may not feel any discomfort once the strength is 100%, but I think it's fair to assume it's going to put extra stress based on what I know now) Any tips on avoiding bad contact while serving or is it a necessary evil of playing? Of course the obvious first step is to avoid a bad toss, but it's going to happen once in a while. Probably, complete follow through is going to help. Anything else?
 

Znak

Professional
What racquet and setup are you using? Have you tried switching that up to see if it alleviates anything?
 

AnyPUG

Rookie
What racquet and setup are you using? Have you tried switching that up to see if it alleviates anything?

Racquet: Wilson Blade CV 98, String: HyperG @ 54.

6 months ago, switched from Wilson NXT(Multifilament) to HyperG (poly) - I guess, I need to go back to NXT and see if string is causing the discomfort.
 

Znak

Professional
I would just to start out with. Have you had any professional medical advice? Or physiotherapy? If it's just serving maybe take a lesson from a coach to see what's going on. If it's all strokes then something could be up with your setup. Anecdotally, I became allergic to my new Yonex EZONE 98 racquet, it was fine for months then out of nowhere I got hand pain between the metacarpal. Switched back to my DR 98 and the pain subsided.
 
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movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Bad vibrations in the hand are usually a bad sign for me. I have not had this problem in a very long time but I think that I just rested for a few weeks when this happened. It's not only on serves - it can happen on other strokes as well, especially if it's more to the side of the racquet as you get torque against your hand. One solution that's worked for me is higher twistweight on the racquet and overall more mass in the racquet. You can add mass in the handle and this will decrease bad twangs in the hand.

You could also practice your toss, watching the ball, etc. But it's hard to hit a good-contact serve all the time as you have sun, wind, etc. If you think it's a bad toss, though, just stop and say "sorry".
 
I'm recovering from an injury and 2 months off from serving, whenever I hit a serve without a clean contact (mainly because of bad toss or messed up timing), my serving hand feels a discomfort that lasts around 10 seconds.
How do you eliminate/reduce hits with bad contact? In the short term, I can take a break from hitting serves until the strength is completely back.
But in the long run, it appears that I'm going to put strain on my hand/wrist/arm etc whenever I fail to make a clean contact. (even though I may not feel any discomfort once the strength is 100%, but I think it's fair to assume it's going to put extra stress based on what I know now) Any tips on avoiding bad contact while serving or is it a necessary evil of playing? Of course the obvious first step is to avoid a bad toss, but it's going to happen once in a while. Probably, complete follow through is going to help. Anything else?
10 seconds seems like a really long time for non-clean contact. You might want to get checked out to make sure you don't have a hairline fracture.

Tightening up because you fear a mis-hit will hurt will only lead to bad technique and more possible injury.
 
I'm recovering from an injury and 2 months off from serving, whenever I hit a serve without a clean contact (mainly because of bad toss or messed up timing), my serving hand feels a discomfort that lasts around 10 seconds.
How do you eliminate/reduce hits with bad contact? In the short term, I can take a break from hitting serves until the strength is completely back.
But in the long run, it appears that I'm going to put strain on my hand/wrist/arm etc whenever I fail to make a clean contact. (even though I may not feel any discomfort once the strength is 100%, but I think it's fair to assume it's going to put extra stress based on what I know now) Any tips on avoiding bad contact while serving or is it a necessary evil of playing? Of course the obvious first step is to avoid a bad toss, but it's going to happen once in a while. Probably, complete follow through is going to help. Anything else?
The hand has only a few tissues.
Google: hand anatomy pictures
Google: hand injuries pictures

.........hand injuries tennis pictures

You can click on the picture to go to the website with the picture.

Locate you pain.
What tissues might it be? Tendons, ligaments, bones, cartilage, bursa sack.....?.......

Nerves are tricky, pinching a nerve up in your arm,or in shoulder area, or neck, etc. may cause pain in your hand. There are nerve maps relating pain to specific nerves.

One thing about developing injuries in the wrist joint, they can become very difficult to heal. See Health and Fitness forums and search the internet..

Getting advice from other players is difficult because there are different techniques being used for the serve and other strokes. Advice from someone with one technique does not necessarily apply to your technique........... Undiagnosed injuries of two players are very likely to be different ............

This gets too complicated for medically uneducated people, so see a well qualified Dr.

I had some wrist pain once while I was trying to learn both a new serve technique and a new forehand technique. When I took videos of my serve I saw that I forced an unusual angle into my wrist in comparison to high level servers. I stopped practicing both and became conscious of not putting my wrist in that stressful looking angle. The pain went away. For slice and flat serves, the arm should tilt to the right and the racket to the left to relieve stress on the wrist at impact. See frames of the serve that show the forearm to racket angle throughout the serve. The grip locks the racket shaft to the hand and then the wrist joint is nearby and can bend for adjustment. But the racket is locked to the hand at quite an angle and if you force the racket head to meet the ball as part of a defective technique, as forcing the racket more straight to the forearm, you might stress the wrist. The wrist is a common location of tennis injuries. Google: tennis wrist injuries

Forearm to racket angles as they appear from different camera viewing angles.

When you are able to serve, take high speed videos of your serve and other suspect strokes and compare. Most active tennis players have a Waiter's Tray technique, not a high level technique, so chances are you do not have a high level serving technique.

Healing time of injuries is long so see a Dr for treatment and advice.
 
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