Not Made in China

Ron Lawson

New User
Are there any rackets NOT Made in China?

I see several “Engineered” elsewhere but all I’ve seen are Made in China.
 

HitMoreBHs

Rookie
Djokovic s radical mp is made in Austria. But they sell you speed made in China.
Nothing necessarily wrong with “Made in China”. Apple products are a good example of how China manufacturing can achieve the highest standards of production quality and refinement if so specified by the outsourcing brand. There will obviously be a cost premium for such.

Trouble with China manufacturing is their willingness to strip things down to a bare minimum of quality in order to minimise production cost. There is a margin of quality and reliability that Europe and North America manufacturing will absolutely refuse to cross. In no small part, this has to do with pride and tradition of the manufacturing facility (“We don’t do that sort of work”). With China manufacturing, this is a non-issue. If you’re willing to go low and cut corners, they’re happy to oblige. After all, the factory is not holding the brand warranty responsibility. I have some personal experience of this myself having been involved in tooling, design and production of sub-specialised surgical instruments and devices in the past.

Given that the most common (and despicable) human frailty is bottomless greed, there is always the temptation for the brand to cut production cost for greater profit. China manufacturing is that temptation, capitalism is the driver and human frailty is the final descent. However, the brands still have control over this and they are not so stupid as to release crap that will jeopardise the long term future of the company. Bottomless greed works in both directions and the need for long term money making assures certain standards must be met.

As such, by and large, “made in China” sports equipment and commodities in general are just fine. Being overly snobbish and mistrusting will just turn you into a miserable scrote. Let it go, dude.
 

Alexh22

Professional
Nothing necessarily wrong with “Made in China”. Apple products are a good example of how China manufacturing can achieve the highest standards of production quality and refinement if so specified by the outsourcing brand. There will obviously be a cost premium for such.

Trouble with China manufacturing is their willingness to strip things down to a bare minimum of quality in order to minimise production cost. There is a margin of quality and reliability that Europe and North America manufacturing will absolutely refuse to cross. In no small part, this has to do with pride and tradition of the manufacturing facility (“We don’t do that sort of work”). With China manufacturing, this is a non-issue. If you’re willing to go low and cut corners, they’re happy to oblige. After all, the factory is not holding the brand warranty responsibility. I have some personal experience of this myself having been involved in tooling, design and production of sub-specialised surgical instruments and devices in the past.

Given that the most common (and despicable) human frailty is bottomless greed, there is always the temptation for the brand to cut production cost for greater profit. China manufacturing is that temptation, capitalism is the driver and human frailty is the final descent. However, the brands still have control over this and they are not so stupid as to release crap that will jeopardise the long term future of the company. Bottomless greed works in both directions and the need for long term money making assures certain standards must be met.

As such, by and large, “made in China” sports equipment and commodities in general are just fine. Being overly snobbish and mistrusting will just turn you into a miserable scrote. Let it go, dude.
Well, my point is directly on how head is intentionally offering inferior graphene products to the public to maximize profit. This company literally does not allow the Chinese plant to touch their proven PT346 radical mold.
On the other hand, China can produce Federer’s personal racquets throughout his career.
 

HitMoreBHs

Rookie
Well, my point is directly on how head is intentionally offering inferior graphene products to the public to maximize profit. This company literally does not allow the Chinese plant to touch their proven PT346 radical mold.
On the other hand, China can produce Federer’s personal racquets throughout his career.
What evidence have you got that current/recent HEAD graphene racquets for the mass market are inferior? I’ve played since 1979, mostly with HEAD racquets and through the MiA years. This includes the late 80s and early 90s where the stick you bought retail had the same hairpin as the pre-mod one given to the pros. There was no magic dust then, as there is also none on the pro-stocks of today.

I have no major issue with the overall quality or performance of current MiC racquets by any mainstream big brand; aside from looser than ideal spec variances, but that’s a double edged sword and not insurmountable.

There’s no magic wand and the PT346 is not going to give you super powers. Find something that feels right for you, then concentrate on the more important aspect of the game which is improving your technique. Constant axe grinding over pro-stocks not being easily available to the common market just cheapens your enjoyment of the game.
 

HuntV10

New User
assuming that you don't want made in china frames because of the quality control then you should give Yonex a try, they are made in Japan and have some of the best quality control. You can also try Angell's tc line since they are made to match the spec you want, altho they don't have any demo program. There are also other brands people mentioned here that you can try.
 

socallefty

Hall of Fame
This post from three months ago addresses the same issue.
If you look at the supply chain of almost any product in electronics, medicines like antibiotics, medical equipment, materials used in semiconductor chips, heavy industry equipment etc. these days, it is bound to have raw materials, components or parts made in China. I work in high-tech and it is certainly true for equipment that sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars. If you look at an Apple iPhone for instance, you’ll be amazed at how many of the components inside are made in China in addition to assembly and test.

So, one of the posters above is right in saying that if a company is willing to pay the costs needed to have tight specifications for a product, it can be done irrespective of whether it is made in a China or other cheap-labor countries in South-East Asia. Most of the Racquet manufacturers don’t see the need to have tighter QC than what they provide because 99.9% of consumers are not trying to match their racquet specs. Even in my case, I have never measured the weight, SW or balance of any of my racquets - when I play with them during the warmup, I am sure that I automatically adjust my swing to account for the spec variances between my identical racquets that are not matched.

If the racquet companies decided to have tighter specs, it would cost them more and it would decrease their profit because it is unlikely that the added quality would give them any significant sales volume increase. It sounds like Yonex is willing to have higher costs to have tighter specs and their gross profit margins might be lower as a result, but their company owners might be fine with it for tennis equipment. As @dr325i states above, they might be doing this as a differentiating feature from their competitors and part of the ‘Made in Japan’ mystique that they promote.

A tennis racquet is a very low-tech product relatively speaking to manufacture and other companies are probably fine with the quality they provide for a mass-manufactured product in a small market volume industry as their customers don’t demand anything better. The entire tennis racquet industry is only a few hundred million in total revenue globally and the quality control is probably more a function of corporate culture than answering the needs of the customers.
 

dr325i

G.O.A.T.
Angell racquets are designed in the UK, but manufactured in China. Then they are shipped back to the UK where they are matched to the desired specs.
There is nothing wrong with things manufactured in China. They can make things better than anywhere else in the world and they can make them lower quality. All depends on how much you want to spend for the margins you get.
iPhone is an example of great quality no different if it were manufactured in California. head, wilson, other manufacturers specify the margins and they build it. And the quality is good and within those margins.
 

flanker2000fr

Professional
There is nothing wrong with things manufactured in China. They can make things better than anywhere else in the world and they can make them lower quality. All depends on how much you want to spend for the margins you get.
iPhone is an example of great quality no different if it were manufactured in California. head, wilson, other manufacturers specify the margins and they build it. And the quality is good and within those margins.
You don't need to convince me that there's nothing wrong with goods produced in China. Manufacturers there can produce at the highest level of quality, as long as their customers are prepared the price for it. And what it's virtually unbeatable at is its capacity to mass produce goods at huge scale, acceptable quality, and at a low cost.
 
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dr325i

G.O.A.T.
Sometimes you need to check your facts before opening your dirty mouth. Just because you talk up some head codes doesn’t make you any better. Many players you list use custom layup and drill pattern. They do NOT use the retail graphene. One thing is for sure: They sure play much better than you.
No, ALL of them I listed as “Graphene” (except Cilic, my bad, using MG layup) use same layups (and materials and from same factories) as sold to the public. As for drill patterns - that does not alter the quality or layup of the frame, just the preference of a pro. You are a very clueless poster that does not understand the basics.
 
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