Not placing the volleys. Just getting it back.

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
Even on the medium pace volleys, I often just get it back and don't think about placement.

The good players seem to be be a split second quicker mentally and think about where they're gonna place the volley and then place right in the opening.

Need to figure out a way to be mentally quicker.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
Even on the medium pace volleys, I often just get it back and don't think about placement.

The good players seem to be be a split second quicker mentally and think about where they're gonna place the volley and then place right in the opening.

Need to figure out a way to be mentally quicker.
What if I told you good volleyers know where they are going to hit the ball before their opponent hits it?

J
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Even on the medium pace volleys, I often just get it back and don't think about placement.

The good players seem to be be a split second quicker mentally and think about where they're gonna place the volley and then place right in the opening.

Need to figure out a way to be mentally quicker.
Practice: have someone feed you progressively faster balls and get better at reacting.

At the same time, you should have an idea of where you'd like to put the ball based on your opponent's position, balance, speed, and tendencies [among other things]. If you serve or approach wide and come in, you have a lot of open court to potentially hit in to. If he's insanely quick, maybe you aim behind him. If he doesn't move forward well, you think about a short or even drop volley.

Ultimately, I have to react to what is given to me so I want to remain flexible but I certainly have preferences and I try to arrange things so I get my preferred shot more often than not.
 

Steady Eddy

Legend
Even on the medium pace volleys, I often just get it back and don't think about placement.

The good players seem to be be a split second quicker mentally and think about where they're gonna place the volley and then place right in the opening.

Need to figure out a way to be mentally quicker.
That's not so bad. By being at the net, you still take away their time. By being at the net they'll get rattled and make mistakes. Any ball that goes back is a good shot.

Bet it still works out for you a high percentage of the time.
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
Practice: have someone feed you progressively faster balls and get better at reacting.

At the same time, you should have an idea of where you'd like to put the ball based on your opponent's position, balance, speed, and tendencies [among other things]. If you serve or approach wide and come in, you have a lot of open court to potentially hit in to. If he's insanely quick, maybe you aim behind him. If he doesn't move forward well, you think about a short or even drop volley.

Ultimately, I have to react to what is given to me so I want to remain flexible but I certainly have preferences and I try to arrange things so I get my preferred shot more often than not.
Physically I think I am not too bad at reacting. I do the split step and get sideways and compact stroke and transfer weight. But I am mentally a split second slow with regard to the brain telling the body to place it in the opening.

As a progression drill, I might try planning ahead and try to go for a specific target almost by default like
"volley out wide". Eventually I might do it in real time.As it stands I often volley right back to the opponent and then kick myself afterwards for not volleying it out wide.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
When you are at the net in ready position, you should note where your opponents are. If a ball is hit at you, you should be able to subconciously aim for spots between them, put away into the alley or at their feet. If the shot is too hot to do that, just get it back so that the ball is in front of you. Be ready for whatever the next shot may be based on what type of shot you hit. I like to hit 'dying quails' or drop volleys just to force the next shot to be hit up. If your issue is not being in a ready position, then you need to practice volleying just inside the baseline. From there, it forces you to be ready. Just my opinion and you may not agree with it.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Physically I think I am not too bad at reacting. I do the split step and get sideways and compact stroke and transfer weight. But I am mentally a split second slow with regard to the brain telling the body to place it in the opening.

As a progression drill, I might try planning ahead and try to go for a specific target almost by default like
"volley out wide". Eventually I might do it in real time.As it stands I often volley right back to the opponent and then kick myself afterwards for not volleying it out wide.
Do you think you're volleying back to your opponent because he represents a target? If so, experiment with actual targets that are independent of the person feeding.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
What if I told you good volleyers know where they are going to hit the ball before their opponent hits it?

J
I wouldnt doubt that, they practice volleys alot and hit them during matches alot, so they must have encountered every situation probably a thousand times and its already automatic, they most likely know by instinct where to place it based on everything and where the opponent is and all.
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
Do you think you're volleying back to your opponent because he represents a target? If so, experiment with actual targets that are independent of the person feeding.
All I really remember thinking about is making clean contact. Nothing about placement. Exception is slow balls.
It could be that I am viewing the opponent as a target and subconsciously hitting back to him.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
All I really remember thinking about is making clean contact. Nothing about placement. Exception is slow balls.
It could be that I am viewing the opponent as a target and subconsciously hitting back to him.
Also, have the feeder stand somewhere else besides the traditional center of the baseline: have him stand near the alley, for example. Do variants where you approach the net as your partner is about to feed, simulating the first volley [this eliminates your approach and his passing shot as variables, allowing you to concentrate on your first volley, the key thing].
 

Off The Wall

Semi-Pro
Physically I think I am not too bad at reacting. I do the split step and get sideways and compact stroke and transfer weight. But I am mentally a split second slow with regard to the brain telling the body to place it in the opening.
It sounds like placement is the last thing on your “to do” list:

1. Split step = good. 2. Turn sideways = 45 degrees is ideal, but not a necessity. 3. Compact stroke = depends on speed of the incoming. Reflex volleys do not involve a stroke. 4. Weight transfer = good, if not a reflex volley. 5. Placement

As Jolly said, your volley placement will depend from where your opponent is hitting. Your planned volley can and sometimes change on the incoming fly, depending on your opponent’s executed shot.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
What if I told you good volleyers know where they are going to hit the ball before their opponent hits it?

J
This is so true.

In doubles, if I'm the net person, if the returner comes down the alley I'm prepping to volley deep CC behind his partner. If the returner goes CC and I'm poaching I'm prepping to put the volley at his partner's feet.

In singles if I make an approach shot to either corner, the volley is going CC. This is already pre-planned when I make the approach.

Now if I'm in the middle of a hectic net exchange, then everything is reflex volleys and I'm really just trying to keep things low and away. There's not as much plan in that situation.

But if you know where you are planning to put a volley well in advance, you don't have to think so much about it, you just set up to do it.
 
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