Novak Djokovic has played 35 tennis matches over 82 consecutive days in 2021

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
Two weeks rest after Wimbledon. And 2 week Wimbledon itself was an easy cakewalk draw. Plenty of time to be rested for Tokyo.
 
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HelenCH

Rookie
Would have been interesting to see all these calculations 24 hours ago right after Zverev got fed a breadstick following on from the Nishikori bagel the day before.
But eventually he hit the wall. It's not surprising that it happened just unlucky timing.
 

threehandedbackhand

Hall of Fame

ghostofMecir

Hall of Fame
Would have been interesting to see all these calculations 24 hours ago right after Zverev got fed a breadstick following on from the Nishikori bagel the day before.
Strangely somehow, it only caught up to him the minute Zverev started blowing him off the court. Also, one would think “tiredness” or “several injuries” against GenZ and Busta wouldn’t be as debilitating as a “torn abdominal muscle” in winning matches.

Wouldn't mind a comparison to other players in the past. Is this a record?
looooooooooooooooool
 
Wouldn't mind a comparison to other players in the past. Is this a record?
LOL.

I've no idea what the actual record is, but just as an example, Ivan Lendl in 1980.

He started his season that year in February. Thereafter he played 138 singles and 66 doubles matches during the season, all the way through to the Masters which was actually played in January 1981. So that's 204 matches in 48 weeks. Among those were 26 singles and 4 doubles played in Bo5. But it gets crazier when you look at it closely.

From his first event at Rancho Mirage in California starting 11 February, he played a tournament every week for 16 consecutive weeks, culminating at the French Open. During that time he played 88 matches in 112(?) days. One singles title captured (highlighted in bold). The consecutive weeks break down as: Rancho Mirage, Denver, Memphis, Washington, Rotterdam, Frankfurt, Milan, Monte Carlo, Houston (S), Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Dallas, Dusseldorf, Hamburg, Rome, Paris. So he had to somehow squeeze three transatlantic flights in there as well as part of his schedule, without a week off.

He then played six consecutive weeks in the run-up to and including the US Open. Singles and doubles combined was 43 matches in 47(?) days. Another one singles title captured. Kitzbuhel, North Conway, Indianapolis, Toronto (S), Cincinnati, US Open, with a transatlantic flight after the first event.

Then in the autumn, he played eight events in consecutive weeks. 47 matches in 56 days, five singles and a doubles title won. Madrid, Barcelona (S & D), Basel (S), Tokyo-1 (S), Tokyo-2, Hong Kong (S), Taipei (S), Bangkok, with a Europe-to-Far East flight in the middle.

His total also includes ten Davis Cup matches played for Czechoslovakia as they won the title for the first time.
 
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HelenCH

Rookie
Strangely somehow, it only caught up to him the minute Zverev started blowing him off the court. Also, one would think “tiredness” or “several injuries” against GenZ and Busta wouldn’t be as debilitating as a “torn abdominal muscle” in winning matches.



looooooooooooooooool
LOL.

I've no idea what the actual record is, but just as an example, Ivan Lendl in 1980.

He started his season that year in February. Thereafter he played 138 singles and 66 doubles matches during the season, all the way through to the Masters which was actually played in January 1981. So that's 204 matches in 48 weeks. Among those were 26 singles and 4 doubles played in Bo5. But it gets crazier when you look at it closely.

From his first event at Rancho Mirage in California starting 11 February, he played a tournament every week for 16 consecutive weeks, culminating at the French Open. During that time he played 88 matches in 112(?) days. One singles title captured (highlighted in bold). The consecutive weeks break down as: Rancho Mirage, Denver, Memphis, Washington, Rotterdam, Frankfurt, Milan, Monte Carlo, Houston (S), Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Dallas, Dusseldorf, Hamburg, Rome, Paris. So he had to somehow squeeze three transatlantic flights in there as well as part of his schedule, without a week off.

He then played six consecutive weeks in the run-up to and including the US Open. Singles and doubles combined was 43 matches in 47(?) days. Another one singles title captured. Kitzbuhel, North Conway, Indianapolis, Toronto (S), Cincinnati, US Open, with a transatlantic flight after the first event.

Then in the autumn, he played eight events in consecutive weeks. 47 matches in 56 days, five singles and a doubles title won. Madrid, Barcelona (S & D), Basel (S), Tokyo-1 (S), Tokyo-2, Hong Kong (S), Taipei (S), Bangkok, with a Europe-to-Far East flight in the middle.

His total also includes ten Davis Cup matches played for Czechoslovakia as they won the title for the first time.
LOL. Lendl was 20. At 20 I thought jet-lag was an urban myth and rest was generally over-rated.
 
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