Oddest, Funniest, or Worst thing you've seen in a USTA match?

N

Nashvegas

Guest
The guy may have felt it was so obvious that he didn't have to actually call the let, and then that you were being a jerk for making him do so.
Perhaps an analogy is when an opponents ball is so far out that it hits the back fence without bouncing, and you don't make an explicit out call or gesture, and then your opponent wants to claim the point unless and until you make the out call.
Have you seen someone do that? That's crazy.
 

OrangePower

Legend
Have you seen someone do that? That's crazy.
Nope! Agreed that would be crazy, albeit by the book (ball is considered good unless called out).
Then again, if my opponent were to be hit by a ball from another court, I would immediately assume a let, whether he actually called for one or not.
 
I was just reminded of this the other day, and it still makes me wonder what the other guy was thinking:

Playing USTA 3.5 doubles, and a mis-hit ball from another court makes a couple of slow, mid-chest high bounces onto opponents' side of the court and makes contact with opponent. Not sure whether it was before or after he played our ball, but I hit it back for a winner. Partner and I set up for next serve. Opponent stands there looking at us like "WTF?" Here's how the rest of the conversation went:

Him: Are we going to replay the point?
Me: Sorry, I didn't hear you call a let.
Him: <Silence>
Me: Did you call a let?
Him: I got hit by the ball.
Me: Just call the let.
Him: NO!
Me: Just call the let.

At this point, my partner, who is more of a peace-maker (or perhaps more conflict-averse) than I am, opted to replay the point.

This incident rubbed me the wrong way because the opponent expected me to just give him the replay. I often let balls bounce or roll across my court without calling a let, so if he was affected by the ball, all he had to was call a 100% completely legitimate let. The ball didn't distract me or my partner...we don't get to call the let. But he didn't either, even after I gave him a chance to, well after the point was over.

Whatever...we won the replayed point, and finished these guys off pretty easily. Guy was a bit of a tool overall...loudly asking for the score every point during our service games before we even approached the baseline for the next serve.
It would never occur to me to do anything other than replay the point. Your opponent probably thought it was obvious and perhaps interpreted your demand to hear him call a let as a control/power thing.

Would you bother calling a let for:

- someone walking by your court spills a bucket of balls that scatter on to your court
- a serve which clearly hit the net, bounces 3' into the air and lands squarely in the middle of the service box

To me, these are obvious examples where no let call is needed: it's understood.

How about next time just say "Please call a let next time so there's no confusion."?

About asking for the score: did he do this throughout the match or only after the uncalled let incident? If he did it only after the incident, maybe it was to try and get back at you.
 

MiPeGr

Rookie
About asking for the score: did he do this throughout the match or only after the uncalled let incident? If he did it only after the incident, maybe it was to try and get back at you.
Nope...pretty much every point his team was returning, from our first service game on...
 

MiPeGr

Rookie
Would you bother calling a let for:

- someone walking by your court spills a bucket of balls that scatter on to your court
- a serve which clearly hit the net, bounces 3' into the air and lands squarely in the middle of the service box
1) Yes...but that's because it would most likely be a hindrance to me. But if all the balls were on my opponent's side of the net, it's up to him, and I would expect them to actually call it. It's not up to me to decide whether they were hindered or not. I don't need them to use the word "let", but I expect them to stop play. In the original incident, my opponent didn't stop play when the hindrance occurred, as the rules require...and that was the core of my beef with him.

2) Yes.

I pretty much call all out balls with an audible or visual signal, regardless of degree of "out-ness", and I expect my opponents to do the same.
 

winchestervatennis

Hall of Fame
It would never occur to me to do anything other than replay the point. Your opponent probably thought it was obvious and perhaps interpreted your demand to hear him call a let as a control/power thing.

Would you bother calling a let for:

- someone walking by your court spills a bucket of balls that scatter on to your court
- a serve which clearly hit the net, bounces 3' into the air and lands squarely in the middle of the service box

To me, these are obvious examples where no let call is needed: it's understood.

How about next time just say "Please call a let next time so there's no confusion."?

About asking for the score: did he do this throughout the match or only after the uncalled let incident? If he did it only after the incident, maybe it was to try and get back at you.
Asking him to call a let next time is prolly the best way to go about this, but I'd suspect the same power/control issues would arise.
 

tennis_ocd

Hall of Fame
Nope! Agreed that would be crazy, albeit by the book (ball is considered good unless called out).
Then again, if my opponent were to be hit by a ball from another court, I would immediately assume a let, whether he actually called for one or not.
lol. Watched my daughter's college match several weeks ago where she got hit by ball from outside court and stopped play. Opposing girl saw what happened and claimed the point because she didn't call out LET. I really don't get into the matches but was irked that my daughter didn't call the coaches over and make the opposing girl publicly state her position to all.
 
lol. Watched my daughter's college match several weeks ago where she got hit by ball from outside court and stopped play. Opposing girl saw what happened and claimed the point because she didn't call out LET. I really don't get into the matches but was irked that my daughter didn't call the coaches over and make the opposing girl publicly state her position to all.
Yeah, that's lame. Maybe it's how the coach taught them. In volleyball, you are taught never to call your own touch no matter how obvious. However in rec play, we all call our touches because that's just how we play. If the two groups never meet, no problem. The conflict starts when one team calls their touches and the other doesn't.
 

Simon_the_furry

Hall of Fame
lol. Watched my daughter's college match several weeks ago where she got hit by ball from outside court and stopped play. Opposing girl saw what happened and claimed the point because she didn't call out LET. I really don't get into the matches but was irked that my daughter didn't call the coaches over and make the opposing girl publicly state her position to all.
I'll admit that I do stuff like that for competitive matches (and I personally don't see much wrong with it in a competitive match), but if it's just a friendly hitting session I agree with being irked 100%.
 

tennis_ocd

Hall of Fame
Seems to bother you more than the players
I've yet to see any player enjoy stepping on unseen balls or moving around ones on court.

If you notice, tourneys even employee kids to keep the court free.

Competitive or fun; there's special thoughts for a guy who doesn't warn another of pending danger.
 
Last edited:

MiPeGr

Rookie
Competitive or fun; there's special thoughts for a guy who doesn't warn another of pending danger.
OK...I was going to let this slide, but you're impugning my character here:

1) Remember, the intruding ball was a slow bouncer, not a line-drive, and not likely a ball someone would trip over, as it was bouncing and in motion. I did not see the opponent get contacted ("hit") by the ball...I only became aware of this after the point was over

2) I did see the ball enter the opponents side of the court, but I was not hindered by it, so I or my partner did not call a let. It is not my responsibility to determine if my opponent was hindered. In fact, it could have resulted in my loss of point if the opponent felt that he was not hindered. (FAC 2016, Rule 26, Case 2)

Case 2: A player claims to have stopped play because the player thought that the
opponent(s) was being hindered. Is this a hindrance?
Decision: No, the player loses the point.

3) After the ball entered the opponents side of the court, and certainly after he was contacted by the ball, the opponent had an opportunity to call a let but did not. He did not even ask to replay the point after the point was over. He simply lined up as if we were going to replay the point, and then objected when my partner and I lined up as if we had won the point.

How am I in the wrong for asking and expecting my opponent to actually ask for a replay of the point, which is his right and responsibility?

That's all I'm gonna say about this. Feel free to distort away...
 
OK...I was going to let this slide, but you're impugning my character here:

1) Remember, the intruding ball was a slow bouncer, not a line-drive, and not likely a ball someone would trip over, as it was bouncing and in motion. I did not see the opponent get contacted ("hit") by the ball...I only became aware of this after the point was over
If you only saw the ball after the point was over, no one can criticize you for not saying anything. However...

2) I did see the ball enter the opponents side of the court, but I was not hindered by it,
this contradicts what you said in "1)": in #1 you said you didn't see the ball; in #2 you said you did see it. Or am I not interpreting what you wrote correctly?

so I or my partner did not call a let. It is not my responsibility to determine if my opponent was hindered. In fact, it could have resulted in my loss of point if the opponent felt that he was not hindered. (FAC 2016, Rule 26, Case 2)
This is where our actions would have differed: if I saw a ball come on the court and it came to rest near the fence, I might not say anything because there's no more chance of them stepping on that ball than any other ball that's resting near the fence. But if it was anywhere near the playing area [including the out court where they might step when going for a lob or a wide shot], I would likely say something because I don't want them to step on the ball and get injured.

Yes, some opponents might get irked because they think I'm doing to get an advantage. I'm not, but I can't prove that. My thinking is "how would I feel if I didn't call it and they did step on it and got injured?". I'd feel like an idiot, that's how. In that case, I'm willing to look foolish or like I'm engaging in gamesmanship to avoid that scenario.


Case 2: A player claims to have stopped play because the player thought that the
opponent(s) was being hindered. Is this a hindrance?
Decision: No, the player loses the point.

3) After the ball entered the opponents side of the court, and certainly after he was contacted by the ball, the opponent had an opportunity to call a let but did not. He did not even ask to replay the point after the point was over. He simply lined up as if we were going to replay the point, and then objected when my partner and I lined up as if we had won the point.

How am I in the wrong for asking and expecting my opponent to actually ask for a replay of the point, which is his right and responsibility?

That's all I'm gonna say about this. Feel free to distort away...
Counter-argument isn't necessarily distortion. It's just a difference of opinion.

As to your question, he assumed it would be a replay because it was obvious to him. It was not obvious to you so you assumed no replay. The question isn't who is right or wrong: it's that the two of you have different expectations of what is "obvious". You explained you would call a let on virtually everything [even if someone spilled a bucket of balls on your court] whereas most people, I'm guessing, would consider certain things obvious and not bother to call them.

The rules say he was supposed to call a let. But many of us do not follow every rule 100%. I know I don't.
 

OrangePower

Legend
If I see a ball come into my opponent's court where there is any chance he may end up stepping on it, I'm going to immediately stop play. IMO doing anything else is just irresponsible.

Think of it from the other perspective. Let's say you are at net and a ball rolls into the court behind you. You don't see it but your opponent does. It's not bothering him, so he does not call a let. He lobs, you backpedal, step on the ball, and get injured. As you are being carried off the court you ask your opponent if he saw it, he says "yeah, but it wasn't bothering me". How would you feel about the situation?
 

Minion

Hall of Fame
Not a USTA match, but pretty entertaining nonetheless. Long story short: I ran and slipped, face first into the corner of some stairs - luckily my left eye socket cushioned the fall - hospital visit, 13 stitches, eye patch etc.. Our neighbours had a tennis court, and we played there often. So, once i was able to take off the patch, and sort of open my left eye, i went and played. I hit an approach, and rushed the net (in sort of a serpentine fashion, as things were a bit blurry), my friend hit a cracking FH, yep, right into my left eye. Stitches tore loose, blood everywhere, shirt covered in blood, etc...back to square one. Was my own fault, being half blind rushing the net though:confused: Took months for my vision to restore. For years after that, you couldn't get me close to the net, even if you paid me.
 

winchestervatennis

Hall of Fame
Not a USTA match, but pretty entertaining nonetheless. Long story short: I ran and slipped, face first into the corner of some stairs - luckily my left eye socket cushioned the fall - hospital visit, 13 stitches, eye patch etc.. Our neighbours had a tennis court, and we played there often. So, once i was able to take off the patch, and sort of open my left eye, i went and played. I hit an approach, and rushed the net (in sort of a serpentine fashion, as things were a bit blurry), my friend hit a cracking FH, yep, right into my left eye. Stitches tore loose, blood everywhere, shirt covered in blood, etc...back to square one. Was my own fault, being half blind rushing the net though:confused: Took months for my vision to restore. For years after that, you couldn't get me close to the net, even if you paid me.
I'm not sure this qualifies since it sounds like you didn't technically "see" it. :)

Just kidding. I took a ball in the eye once as a junior - not nearly as serious as yours. It did blur my vision for a day or so but not long term effects thankfully.
 

tennis_ocd

Hall of Fame
not likely a ball someone would trip over, as it was bouncing and in motion....
An unseen low bouncing ball, or one rolling on a court, is every bit as likely to get stepped on as one sitting still. In fact, if seen, in motion, and played around, it's probably even more likely to end up under foot. It's just totally unnecessary for a tennis point. No distortion just a difference in opinion.

(If an opposing team clearly sees a ball and chooses to start point or play around I'll keep quiet. Although rare, I have seen some players require every ball at net be picked up.)
 
Not a USTA match, but pretty entertaining nonetheless. Long story short: I ran and slipped, face first into the corner of some stairs - luckily my left eye socket cushioned the fall - hospital visit, 13 stitches, eye patch etc.. Our neighbours had a tennis court, and we played there often. So, once i was able to take off the patch, and sort of open my left eye, i went and played. I hit an approach, and rushed the net (in sort of a serpentine fashion, as things were a bit blurry), my friend hit a cracking FH, yep, right into my left eye. Stitches tore loose, blood everywhere, shirt covered in blood, etc...back to square one. Was my own fault, being half blind rushing the net though:confused: Took months for my vision to restore. For years after that, you couldn't get me close to the net, even if you paid me.
Uh, you don't wear goggles now when playing [racquetball players do, some BB players, etc.]?
 
Absolutely wrong.

MTM is no longer a part of CPR for sudden cardiac arrest, because it works just as well as compressions. If you have a CPR mask, then you can use it. The only people who carry around CPR masks with them are trained professionals. I have not ever seen or heard of a "random" person carrying one around.

If you didnt know this, your CPR certification has to be long expired. IIRC, MTM was no longer a part of CPR for at least 5 years, probably more.
According to the ER nurse I spoke to, here are the following options in order of most preferred to least preferred:

- 2 people: one doing chest compressions + one doing MTM [they use a bellows-type device]
- 1 person doing chest compressions
- 1 person doing MTM
- nothing

Her statement echoed my original thought: the change in guidelines was due to people being freaked out over having to do MTM and potentially catching some communicable disease so they avoided rendering any aid whatsoever. Since compressions are more valuable than MTM, they compromised and introduced the new guidelines [ie "hands-on" CPR].

Professionals like the nurse I spoke to do both which implies there is value in MTM; otherwise, why would they waste their time?

Of course, in an ER there are usually at least 2 people. In an "on the street" scenario, there may not be.
 

Mac33

Hall of Fame
Playing in a pennant match a few years ago - I was suffering from a mild pinched nerve in my back that was in the healing stage. At the start of the match I could hardly run or pick the ball up!

As the Match went on it warmed up considerably and I started playing much better!

At match point to myself my opponent hits the ball well long.

I go to retrieve the ball from the back fence,then I turn around to shake my opponents hand.

As I approach the net I see his racquet on the grass over the fence.

His girlfriend then comes and picks it up and as I leave the court she apologises to me - I thought it was just funny.

It didn't end at that though - he did not stay for the doubles match which resulted in two of our other players missing out on a match. We still lost the match though.
 

pyk64

New User
lol about the doc. What is the doc's specialty? Do you think that would make a difference? I mean with an ankle injury there is nothing he can do. He won't have pain meds to give, and can't fix the injury right there. I'm sure if someone passed out for no apparent reason he would jump in because there are things he knows how to do until paramedics arrive.
So not at USTA match, but I was playing a USTA doubles practice match with my friend. As I pushed off to return a serve I felt like someone had shot me or clubbed me with a baseball bat on my left calf. After getting situated and trying to stand up, I inquired or my friend, "so what do you think? Achilles or torn calf?" His reply was classic, "heck if I know, I'm just a shoulder surgeon!"
 

Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
Our Line #1 doubles team in high school had an ongoing bet ... for every time one of them hit an opposing player the other would owe him a dollar. The dollar soon became more important than anything else. Anytime a sitter came up they would always hit someone, no matter how easy it would have been to just put the ball away.

During one match, after hitting their opponents multiple times. A short lob went up and the opposing players ran off the court one of them hiding behind the water cooler near the net post … the guy on our team hit the short overhead nailing the side fence just over his head … lol The opposing player’s dad came out of the stands to voice his displeasure at the shot.
My high school team ran similar bets. Coaches never knew, so they could deny knowledge... but they knew. Goal #1 was intimidate the opponent. You can't play doubles if you are scared. And if you can't hit a solid second serve, your partner is going to hate you, either that or move to two back.

A husband-wife 4.5/3.5 team in 8.0 MXD where he went off on her so bad, his captain had to come calm him down (after he actually threw his racket at the wall, narrowly missing his wife)...and her teammates offered to drive her home afterwards because he was still steaming. Sad, that, they actually won the match -- but we made it way too close for comfort in the second set, 7-5.
Damn.

Also, had an ALTA teammate that says he got distracted and lost his mixed doubles match because the female player on the court beside them had a thong on under her skirt. I didn't get a look at her undergarments and my guess it was probably a case of wedgey instead of a thong.
Ahhh, the ATL. Doesn't get better than ALTA. Heard it's a great way to meet women.
 

dizzlmcwizzl

Hall of Fame
I usually just read posts, but I had to log in to respond. Two incidents stand out in my "career" ....

First) 5 Years ago at sectionals we were playing the team from West Virginia. At one point my partner hits a ball long (maybe 3 feet). The opponent on the baseline stops the ball with his racket. We claim the point ... to which they yell at us that if we are going to play with the rule books in our pockets, they are just going to leave ... which they 5 minutes later when we explained that they were not allowed to yell at us as we were hitting overheads.


Second) 8 years ago I am playing a singles match. I always used to hit a big serve on the first with about a 30% success rate. Any who, my opponent had the annoying habit of constantly returning out serves with a full swing. The ball would roll all over the place and I would have to clear it before the second serve. At first, I politely asked him to stop ... he refused saying he wanted the practice. I explained that this was against the code but he was adamant. I can become a real turd, and proceeded to do bad, bad things. I would hit his practice returns back and then insist he clear his side of the court. He got upset and called his captain, who told him to stop returning out serves.... he of course refused and continued to practice on my serve. Then I started doing quite a bit of trash talking ... each time letting him know that if he would stop I would stop ... he persisted, so I became a bigger pile. Finally serving up 30-love to win the match I hit a drop shot, which he got, only to allow me to line up a forehand to his chest. After clocking him good, I asked him if my ball was in, and if was that the reason why he did not return it ..... He swore in his native language, slammed his racket on the court and walked off. HIs captain apologized to me repeatedly, but really ... I should have apologized.
 

OrangePower

Legend
Second) 8 years ago I am playing a singles match. I always used to hit a big serve on the first with about a 30% success rate. Any who, my opponent had the annoying habit of constantly returning out serves with a full swing. The ball would roll all over the place and I would have to clear it before the second serve. At first, I politely asked him to stop ... he refused saying he wanted the practice. I explained that this was against the code but he was adamant. I can become a real turd, and proceeded to do bad, bad things. I would hit his practice returns back and then insist he clear his side of the court. He got upset and called his captain, who told him to stop returning out serves.... he of course refused and continued to practice on my serve. Then I started doing quite a bit of trash talking ... each time letting him know that if he would stop I would stop ... he persisted, so I became a bigger pile. Finally serving up 30-love to win the match I hit a drop shot, which he got, only to allow me to line up a forehand to his chest. After clocking him good, I asked him if my ball was in, and if was that the reason why he did not return it ..... He swore in his native language, slammed his racket on the court and walked off. HIs captain apologized to me repeatedly, but really ... I should have apologized.
That one is hilarious!
What if your opponent starts returning your serves 'for practice', so then you start hitting the returns back 'for practice', then he starts returning your shot, and so on... next thing you know, you are playing out long rallies 'for practice' :)
 

dizzlmcwizzl

Hall of Fame
That one is hilarious!
What if your opponent starts returning your serves 'for practice', so then you start hitting the returns back 'for practice', then he starts returning your shot, and so on... next thing you know, you are playing out long rallies 'for practice' :)
The only problem is that I am not good enough to hit it more than once or twice .... I don't have long rallys .... even in practice.
 

dizzlmcwizzl

Hall of Fame
This reminded me of another funny moment ... caught on tape. My buddy Sean and I were drilling. He was serving/volleying and I was returning. At one point I coughed up a mishit sitter which he proceeded to hit right at me. I jokingly told him I would get him back ... then three serves later I drilled him right in the back.

The video is of the initial shot which prompter my threat ... then fast forward through 3 serves ... and my revenge. There has been no editing other than to speed up the three uninteresting points in the middle.


My favorite part is apologizing for doing exactly what I told him I was going to do 2 minutes earlier. I smiled posting this.
 

OrangePower

Legend
This reminded me of another funny moment ... caught on tape. My buddy Sean and I were drilling. He was serving/volleying and I was returning. At one point I coughed up a mishit sitter which he proceeded to hit right at me. I jokingly told him I would get him back ... then three serves later I drilled him right in the back.

The video is of the initial shot which prompter my threat ... then fast forward through 3 serves ... and my revenge. There has been no editing other than to speed up the three uninteresting points in the middle.

My favorite part is apologizing for doing exactly what I told him I was going to do 2 minutes earlier. I smiled posting this.
Looks like you were doing crosscourt drills for dubs, so smaller area to hit into and more likelihood of hitting the other guy :)
When you hit him though it looks like he had enough time to attempt a BH volley rather than turn his back... but hard to judge ball speed via video.
 

stapletonj

Professional
On behalf of all WV players, let me say they were the exception.

We know the rules better than that, and there is very little drama at our clubs, even amongst the women (sigh, yeah, I know, sexist)
 
Top