Official Sureshs tribute thread

Not clear whom you are addressing since I have never ignored you and I am not magnificent. I take it you are referring to The Great Shooresh.
You mean this isn't you ? :(


I am not sure how big the market is for circus tents these days. You need a lot of cloth to put even a small portion of suresh on it.
That reminds me of an old joke I had read about three men talking about their fat wives...and one says that when he takes his wife's skirt to the laundry, the owner of the laundry sees him from afar and shouts out that they don't launder tents in there.
 
You mean this isn't you ? :(



That reminds me of an old joke I had read about three men talking about their fat wives...and one says that when he takes his wife's skirt to the laundry, the owner of the laundry sees him from afar and shouts out that they don't launder tents in there.
Is it @Genious at Work that is from that neck of the woods and claims endowment like a sequoia???
 
Played some table tennis yesterday. Quite humiliating being schooled by grandma Joan and coach grandpa Steve who charges 5 $ a head for group lessons in Balboa Park.

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Sad to see you fall so low and use such a noble implement (a table) for matters far below its intended utility (AYCE food receptacle.) What is next? A treadmill? Disgust and enrage.
 
I learnt that there is a no-man's land in table tennis: the center of the baseline. It seems it is most prone to the "elbow attack" which confuses you whether to hit forehand or backhand. So the right thing to do in TT is to always be on side to the other, and moving to the other side as necessary with two giant steps only.

Since I had to pick up the balls manually rather than the tennis racket-leg trick, I was bending down very frequently and that gave me a lot of dizziness due to my progressive lenses.

I find TT more physically demanding than tennis.
 
I learnt that there is a no-man's land in table tennis: the center of the baseline. It seems it is most prone to the "elbow attack" which confuses you whether to hit forehand or backhand. So the right thing to do in TT is to always be on side to the other, and moving to the other side as necessary with two giant steps only.

Since I had to pick up the balls manually rather than the tennis racket-leg trick, I was bending down very frequently and that gave me a lot of dizziness due to my progressive lenses.

I find TT more physically demanding than tennis.
Moast uv us have fownd TT moar mintally demanding bcoz uv ewe.
 
I find TT more physically demanding than tennis.
Just remember this: You must be shapeless, formless, like water. When you pour water in a cup, it becomes the cup. When you pour water in a bottle, it becomes the bottle. When you pour water in a teapot, it becomes the teapot. Water can drip and it can crash. Become like water my friend.

Word of advice. If you cannot become water at least drink a lot so you can take frequent bathroom breaks to recover.
 
I learnt that there is a no-man's land in table tennis: the center of the baseline. It seems it is most prone to the "elbow attack" which confuses you whether to hit forehand or backhand. So the right thing to do in TT is to always be on side to the other, and moving to the other side as necessary with two giant steps only.

Since I had to pick up the balls manually rather than the tennis racket-leg trick, I was bending down very frequently and that gave me a lot of dizziness due to my progressive lenses.

I find TT more physically demanding than tennis.
You should start teaching table tennis too in related boards. I think you are ready.
 
Just got my copy of "Suresh Drop Volley: A Bottom-Up approach" from amazon.

Am excite as I rip off the packaging. Can't weight to see what lies beneath the covers.
Why must everything turn into a discussed fecal joak concerning Safroosh?

I go on sabbatical for a few months and still you appear excite for painful and dangerous STC auto release.

Have you not seen the actual drop volley?

Please advice.
 
Why must everything turn into a discussed fecal joak concerning Safroosh?

I go on sabbatical for a few months and still you appear excite for painful and dangerous STC auto release.

Have you not seen the actual drop volley?

Please advice.
The Safroosh nickname should bee mildly adapted to Sureshmooch bcoz Hee likes a free meal AND Hee haz ma.s.s.tered the fandango single foot split step preceding the droop volley.
 
Since I had to pick up the balls manually rather than the tennis racket-leg trick, I was bending down very frequently and that gave me a lot of dizziness due to my progressive lenses.
Somehow I have no problem imagining you picking your balls and bending down frequently. What doesn't quite add up is the dizziness part. Are you sure it wasn't your opponent and the spectators who had to deal with constant dizziness? With you picking your balls and bending down frequently?
 
I learnt that there is a no-man's land in table tennis: the center of the baseline. It seems it is most prone to the "elbow attack" which confuses you whether to hit forehand or backhand. So the right thing to do in TT is to always be on side to the other, and moving to the other side as necessary with two giant steps only.
What I do know is that there is a no-man's land in dining, and that is the AYCE when you appear in the horizon. Ennio Morricone wrote a fitting main theme for that scenario.

 
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Somehow I have no problem imagining you picking your balls and bending down frequently. What doesn't quite add up is the dizziness part. Are you sure it wasn't your opponent and the spectators who had to deal with constant dizziness? With you picking your balls and bending down frequently?
The dizziness part is a consequence of the motion blur caused by scene shift across the refractive index gradient of the progressive lens. A rapidly dropping or rising ball in tennis also causes me this problem.

Interestingly, when I told the coach about this, he said more likely you have an inner ear imbalance issue. Then I realized my father has had the same problem for the last 50 years and 2 months ago, fell down with dizziness in a restaurant and fractured his knee.
 
The dizziness part is a consequence of the motion blur caused by scene shift across the refractive index gradient of the progressive lens. A rapidly dropping or rising ball in tennis also causes me this problem.

Interestingly, when I told the coach about this, he said more likely you have an inner ear imbalance issue. Then I realized my father has had the same problem for the last 50 years and 2 months ago, fell down with dizziness in a restaurant and fractured his knee.
I hope your father recovers promptly. And whatever you do don't step on his knee.

Inner ear problems can be a huge problem. Imagine how many slams you could have won if not for your inner ear imbalance.
 
I hope your father recovers promptly. And whatever you do don't step on his knee.

Inner ear problems can be a huge problem. Imagine how many slams you could have won if not for your inner ear imbalance.
Eye <3 srshs’ purRFect balance displayed on his single foot split step just prior to releasing Hiz intoxicating pheromones wile Hee droop volleys four awl uv humanity two disgust.
 
Interestingly, when I told the coach about this, he said more likely you have an inner ear imbalance issue. Then I realized my father has had the same problem for the last 50 years and 2 months ago, fell down with dizziness in a restaurant and fractured his knee.
That's what occurred to me, too. My dad also had it and called it Vertigo. He was given some medication for it too. There were also some exercises (rolling) that he had to do.

Is your dad still with the in-laws ? Has he recovered ?
 
That's what occurred to me, too. My dad also had it and called it Vertigo. He was given some medication for it too. There were also some exercises (rolling) that he had to do.

Is your dad still with the in-laws ? Has he recovered ?
He is with my father-in-law. He has 2 more weeks of physio to go before he can stand on that leg. That is what he has been told.
 
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