Official Wilson Clash thread

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
I hit with the clash today. It did not feel like the most flexible racquet ever made. Intact it felt stiffer than my Prestige Classic.
 

Holdfast44ID

Semi-Pro
I think the idea with the Clash is to have a frame that hits like a stiff, higher powered frame while being a high flex, arm-friendly stick. I think it succeeds in these areas. I have had no arm issues with the Tour. I am curious how the 98 Tour will feel.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
I think the idea with the Clash is to have a frame that hits like a stiff, higher powered frame while being a high flex, arm-friendly stick. I think it succeeds in these areas. I have had no arm issues with the Tour. I am curious how the 98 Tour will feel.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
The hype of it being the most flexible racquet ever is BS. It does feel more comfortable than a Babolat Pure Drive, I’ll give them that. All you have to do is pick up a Rossignol F200 and hit a few with that and compare it to the Clash as which is more flexible.
 

Adm

Rookie
I hit with the clash today. It did not feel like the most flexible racquet ever made. Intact it felt stiffer than my Prestige Classic.

It is like you are comparing a Formula 1 car with the fastest SUV car on the market, and saying "ahhhh, this SUV is not the fastest thing ever made".

Totally different racquets.

Wilson Clash Tour is the softest racquet ever made that it is so flexible and so stable at the same time (and even so much lighter from the Preestige Classic?). And keep in mind the profile of Wilson Clash and that of prestige classic (is it 19mm?).
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
It is like you are comparing a Formula 1 car with the fastest SUV car on the market, and saying "ahhhh, this SUV is not the fastest thing ever made".

Totally different racquets.

Wilson Clash Tour is the softest racquet ever made that it is so flexible and so stable at the same time (and even so much lighter from the Preestige Classic?). And keep in mind the profile of Wilson Clash and that of prestige classic (is it 19mm?).
The Clash Tour is not the most flexible ever made. That is the biggest bunch of BS ever put out by a racquet company. I hit with it and have seen RDC measurements. It is not let me repeat it is not the just flexible racquet ever made. There are wood and other composite racquets that are way more flexible.
 

mhkeuns

Hall of Fame
Most flexible & comfortable tweeners ever made? Doesn't sound all that bad. However, just like @vsbabolat mentions, the Clash is definitely not the most flexible frame ever made. And, it is not a bad thing that it isn't. A frame that thick and light should come with some rigidness, imo.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Most flexible & comfortable tweeners ever made? Doesn't sound all that bad. However, just like @vsbabolat mentions, the Clash is definitely not the most flexible frame ever made. And, it is not a bad thing that it isn't. A frame that thick and light should come with some rigidness, imo.
It’s much more comfortable than a Pure Drive
 
I have been teaching and hitting with students with my Clash 100 and its just a touch light, but the flex feels good, its a nice racket to feed with. Youn can definitely can feel the dwell time of the ball on the strings. One of the more unique feeling rackets I have ever hit with, and I have been playing for over 40 years. I put some Luxilon at around 55 and its gotten lower and it feels like a good combo for spin and power. I can hit with my better students but i will be getting the tour model soon so I can make a better comparison. My intermediate students really like it and I think a couple of them are going to buy it.
 

Adm

Rookie
The Clash Tour is not the most flexible ever made. That is the biggest bunch of BS ever put out by a racquet company. I hit with it and have seen RDC measurements. It is not let me repeat it is not the just flexible racquet ever made. There are wood and other composite racquets that are way more flexible.

Which company has claimed that this is the most flexible racquet EVER MADE???


Anyone who appreciates soft racquets should give a big thumb up for Wilson coming up with something so modern and yet so flexible.


And yes, it is revolutionary... fixed beam width... thick profile... so flexible... so super stable in relation to its weight.
 

Automatix

Hall of Fame
Which company has claimed that this is the most flexible racquet EVER MADE???
Ummm... Wilson?
"With an SI of 11.2 and a TS score of 3.9, Clash not only became the most flexible racket ever, but its baseline stability lived up to industry standards. It was a huge win for the team. "
* FLEXIBILITY CLAIM: BASED UPON INTERNAL STIFFNESS INDEX TESTING PERFORMED AT WILSON INNOVATION CENTER BETWEEN OCTOBER 2016 – OCTOBER 2018.

You can find this here: https://www.wilson.com/en-us/explore/labs/clash-tennis-racket
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
How does it compare to Vantage Bastcore which has an RA of 49?

Mods: delete if inappropriate as TW doesn't carry this.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Which company has claimed that this is the most flexible racquet EVER MADE???


Anyone who appreciates soft racquets should give a big thumb up for Wilson coming up with something so modern and yet so flexible.


And yes, it is revolutionary... fixed beam width... thick profile... so flexible... so super stable in relation to its weight.
HEAD had nice light widebody's in the 90's made out of graphite and Twaron that was stable, light, and soft. There is nothing revolutionary about the Clash. Its going against the trend of stiffer lighter modern racquets. It's marketing spin. You seem to be a Wilson fanboy.

It is Wilson's claim that its the most flexible racquet ever. What a joke.
 
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MRfStop

Hall of Fame
Has anyone had chipping paint problems with their Clash? I demoed a couple at my club and they all look pretty beaten up even though they have only had them for a couple of months. A lot worse than normal wear and tear. Anybody else notice this?
I just got a dime size paint chip from my racquet hitting my partners racquet on a volley. I really hate the velvet paint.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Has anyone had chipping paint problems with their Clash? I demoed a couple at my club and they all look pretty beaten up even though they have only had them for a couple of months. A lot worse than normal wear and tear. Anybody else notice this?
My buddy's Clash Tour has chipping rubber paint already. Rubber paint is the worst for racquets and Wilson's QC for fit and finish is the worst in the industry.
 
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Holdfast44ID

Semi-Pro
My buddy's Clash Tour has chipping rubber paint already. Rubber paint is the worst for racquets and Wilson's QC for fit and finish is the worst in the industry.
Maybe we should coat the racquet with a protective finish? Lol. I think I just invented a new product! "Racquet Seal"

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

babar

Professional
In my limited experience with each, the Clash 100 Tour will be softer, get more spin, more power, less control, with more stability and a higher launch angle.
I play with the current Speed 360 Pro and have played a few matches with the Clash Tour.
First, CTour was strung with 4G 125 at a low tension. Felt like it was in the high 40s.
I loved the feel of the CTour. Very solid and stable. Great spin and good power.
Didn't feel too bulky and unwieldy, but more so than the Speed 360 Pro.
Definitely more power than the 360 Pro and more depth on strokes. Net game was also solid and serves were more powerful.
The biggest difference to me was the Speed Pro 360 felt faster and more maneuverable, but a lot less powerful.
I had a brand new demo with no use on it and just putting it in my bag with the Speed Pro, some of the paint chipped off the throat and head.
I've heard the new velvety smooth Wilson paint is not the most durable, so I guess that's how it is.
 

Adm

Rookie
HEAD a nice light widebody's in the 90's made out graphite and Twaron that was stable, light, and soft. There is nothing revolutionary about the Clash. Its going against the trend of stiffer lighter modern racquets. It's marketing spin. You seem to be a Wilson fanboy.

It is Wilson's claim that its the most flexible racquet ever. What a joke.

No, Wilson has not done such a claim, this is a lie.

This is what Wilson says:
*FLEXIBILITY CLAIM: BASED UPON INTERNAL STIFFNESS INDEX TESTING PERFORMED AT WILSON INNOVATION CENTER BETWEEN OCTOBER 2016 – OCTOBER 2018.

And I am not a fan of Wilson, I am not a fan of HEAD. I am also not a hater of either...

As a matter of fact I dislike most Wilson models, not to mention their quality control. You look the hater. You are so obsessed with your Head fantasy that you widespread a lie against another company, and you even throw Rossignol F200 on the table as a matter of comparison with the Clash? This is hate :(

I would support any company that produces racquets like the Clash.

Give me the specific HEAD model please... Keep the hate aside, keep the personal stuff away, and give me some facts, I would truly appreciate it.
 
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TypeRx

Semi-Pro
Maybe we should coat the racquet with a protective finish? Lol. I think I just invented a new product! "Racquet Seal"

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
Although I have some scuffs on the sides of my Clash Tours, I was most concerned about the head as the grommet strip/protector doesn't fully cover things. So, after stringing I've been putting on some Wilson Racket Head Tape. Unlike the stuff from other brands (1"), Wilson is 1.25" and covers better.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
No, Wilson has not done such a claim, this is a lie.

This is what Wilson says:
*FLEXIBILITY CLAIM: BASED UPON INTERNAL STIFFNESS INDEX TESTING PERFORMED AT WILSON INNOVATION CENTER BETWEEN OCTOBER 2016 – OCTOBER 2018.

And I am not a fan of Wilson, I am not a fan of HEAD. I am also not a hater of either...

As a matter of fact I dislike most Wilson models, not to mention their quality control. You look the hater. You are so obsessed with your Head fantasy that you widespread a lie against another company, and you even throw Rossignol F200 on the table as a matter of comparison with the Clash? This is hate :(

I would support any company that produces racquets like the Clash.

Give me the specific HEAD model please... Keep the hate aside, keep the personal stuff away, and give me some facts, I would truly appreciate it.
You have a reading comprehension problem:
With an SI of 11.2 and a TS score of 3.9, Clash not only became the most flexible racket ever, but its baseline stability lived up to industry standards. It was a huge win for the team. "


This is a lie and not true. There are many racquets made by many companies that are more flexible over the years.
 
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GLten

New User
You have a reading comprehension problem:
With an SI of 11.2 and a TS score of 3.9, Clash not only became the most flexible racket ever, but its baseline stability lived up to industry standards. It was a huge win for the team. "


This is a lie and not true. There are many racquets made by many companies that are more flexible over the years.
vsbabolat please post the link, I can not find that
 

Goldie

Rookie
Bottom line is the Clash tour is a great racket. It is flexible and is a heck of a lot softer than the Babolat Pure Drive and the Wilson Blade. I have played with the blades for 8 years, and now have wrist issues. I can play with the Clash, and no pain afterwards. Big improvement, and save your joints and buy one. Compared to what is on the market today, it is the most flexible racket in production today, you might try one and see for yourself. Title formerly held by Prokennex!

I like the way it plays, solid from all parts of the court. Took me 2 weeks to completely move off the Blades. Game hasn't suffered.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Based on Wilson SI this is likely true. Based on RA it is not. However RA will likely no longer be used in 5-10 years since babolat is no longer producing RDC machines and you cannot calibrate the current ones.
There are racquets that have been made that are more flexible than the Clash. There are racquets more flexible than the Jack Kramer Autograph.
 
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TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
Just bought my 2nd Clash Tour today off the Bay. ($35 less than retail) I'm not a string breaker, but I hate having just one racquet in my bag. I know it's not for everyone, but I can't imagine playing with any other racquet now.
 

tim-ay

Rookie
You have a reading comprehension problem:
With an SI of 11.2 and a TS score of 3.9, Clash not only became the most flexible racket ever, but its baseline stability lived up to industry standards. It was a huge win for the team. "


This is a lie and not true. There are many racquets made by many companies that are more flexible over the years.
Yeah but who the F cares. Man....some perspective.
 

Hankenstein

Hall of Fame
Just bought my 2nd Clash Tour today off the Bay. ($35 less than retail) I'm not a string breaker, but I hate having just one racquet in my bag. I know it's not for everyone, but I can't imagine playing with any other racquet now.
The new LXN Smart last maximum 90 minutes of play at 44 lbs for me in the Clash. I only have one Clash 295 gram customized to 305 grams. Waiting for Wilson sweden to get a new delivery so i can buy a bunch more. Really love everything with the Clash-racket.
 
The new LXN Smart last maximum 90 minutes of play at 44 lbs for me in the Clash. I only have one Clash 295 gram customized to 305 grams. Waiting for Wilson sweden to get a new delivery so i can buy a bunch more. Really love everything with the Clash-racket.
You also have the VCore 100, right? How do they compare (control, power, feel, spin) ? And how would you rate control when playing with vs. without spin?
I had the feeling to have more control with Clash while playing flat.
 

Hankenstein

Hall of Fame
You also have the VCore 100, right? How do they compare (control, power, feel, spin) ? And how would you rate control when playing with vs. without spin?
I had the feeling to have more control with Clash while playing flat.
I really liked Vcore 100 in the beginning when I got a demo-frame, but when i later bought 3 more, I felt it had a different feel compared to the one i tested. More hollow, stiff. Even with exact same specs, setup etc. Strange.. I would say the Vcore is more sluggish. Intended more for really aggressive baseline-players with tons of spin and power. The Clash provides more spinn and power.

Ezone 100 is more towards the dampend feel of the Clash imo compared to the Vcore 100.
 

tim-ay

Rookie
Right, we live in a society where the truth Has no place and it’s all about the hyperbole. The only thing that matters is Wilson will sell racquets
Nah, it’s just that enough is enough. Your 40 posts make it clear you have busted them, at least using statistics that align with your point.

Yawn.

I actually hit with one - and while I’m not giving up my six ones- it was interesting. Wilson is on to something, it’s just not for me in this format yet.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Nah, it’s just that enough is enough. Your 40 posts make it clear you have busted them, at least using statistics that align with your point.

Yawn.

I actually hit with one - and while I’m not giving up my six ones- it was interesting. Wilson is on to something, it’s just not for me in this format yet.
Shocking a flexible racquet. Who knew!?
 

ericg

Rookie
They have control.. just got to find the right string and tension set up... What makes them different is the soft flex so your normal sting and tension in your current racket probably will not work.
I put RPM blast 17g in a full bed at 44lbs..just not feeling connected to it and no pocketing. Any recommendation for a different setup ?

I’ve been playing with a PA with RPM at 48/50 lbs
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
I put RPM blast 17g in a full bed at 44lbs..just not feeling connected to it and no pocketing. Any recommendation for a different setup ?

I’ve been playing with a PA with RPM at 48/50 lbs
Try the same tension next. I strung up my clash at the same tension as my sticks with the same pattern and head size. Worked just fine at the same tension.
 

tim-ay

Rookie
Shocking a flexible racquet. Who knew!?
But you hit with it, you know it’s not just a flexible racket. It really has a unique feel. I’m not ready for that as I’m so locked in on six ones right now. But I played two years with modded pure drive plus(es), so I get what’s going on here. It’s promising tech. And not just a normal, flexy racket. I also played 2 years with a pro staff 95s.... which is nothing at all like the clash, although very low RA
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
The new LXN Smart last maximum 90 minutes of play at 44 lbs for me in the Clash. I only have one Clash 295 gram customized to 305 grams. Waiting for Wilson sweden to get a new delivery so i can buy a bunch more. Really love everything with the Clash-racket.

I tried the Smart and it just didn’t work for me. I had it strung at a low tension and it was basically a trampoline for me. Went back to Alu Power 16L at 55lbs and it plays like a dream. I may experiment with Alu hybrids on my next restringing.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
But you hit with it, you know it’s not just a flexible racket. It really has a unique feel. I’m not ready for that as I’m so locked in on six ones right now. But I played two years with modded pure drive plus(es), so I get what’s going on here. It’s promising tech. And not just a normal, flexy racket. I also played 2 years with a pro staff 95s.... which is nothing at all like the clash, although very low RA
I don’t find it that unique. It was muted, no vibration, had thicker feel. But didn’t feel flexible. I guess that’s unique in today's market place. The Pro Sraff 95S is that low. It’s 64 strung. I like flexible racquets and prefer them. I play with a flexible racquet.
 

mhkeuns

Hall of Fame
But you hit with it, you know it’s not just a flexible racket. It really has a unique feel. I’m not ready for that as I’m so locked in on six ones right now. But I played two years with modded pure drive plus(es), so I get what’s going on here. It’s promising tech. And not just a normal, flexy racket. I also played 2 years with a pro staff 95s.... which is nothing at all like the clash, although very low RA
Could you elaborate on what you mean by the unique feel?
 

tim-ay

Rookie
Could you elaborate on what you mean by the unique feel?
First, I think string set up makes a big difference. A hitting friend of mine has a couple and let me hit with one. He had Alu power mains and some syn in the crosses, 4 grams of lead at 12 and some on the handle. I could feel the frame flex but not as much as I expected, not like a PS95 for instance. And the feel seems to change based on if you’re going for it or not. At times it felt like the pre 2015 pure drive to me.... that very muted disconnected feel (edited to add I love that frame, the black orange/ play model).... and other times it felt like something else (maybe a dr+). I don’t know, others have described it better.

I like that very crisp control feel right now I’m getting from k factor six ones so it’s hard for me to compare. And it deserves some longer hitting sessions (from me). I’m just too dialed in right now and not looking for a change otherwise I might buy a tour version, play around with lead, and see if I could like it. Maybe when the 98 version comes out in the fall.
 

tim-ay

Rookie
I don’t find it that unique. It was muted, no vibration, had thicker feel. But didn’t feel flexible. I guess that’s unique in today's market place. The Pro Sraff 95S is that low. It’s 64 strung. I like flexible racquets and prefer them. I play with a flexible racquet.
I think you were trying to say the PS95S “isn’t” that low? Yeah I know the RA but I’m telling you that thing is a noodle when you unload on the ball. Which I loved the feel, but once I started playing 4.5’s it just didn’t have enough ooommmph. I felt knocked around, which put me on the hunt and had me playing the pure drive + for awhile. And eventually... the pure drive + started causing pain.

I think the clash could be set up (with lead) to not get pushed around like the 95S but the flex is lower. But I’m playing too well with the six ones to mess with my head ( I have 10 matched at 358 grams. Haha. Maybe the weight?) Those things just don’t hurt me at all but play like a modern frame with control too. I don’t know why as they are stiff on RA compared to say a 93p. There is more to arm pain than RA, that’s for sure. Maybe there is something to this SI measurement.
 
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SpinToWin

Talk Tennis Guru
Could you elaborate on what you mean by the unique feel?
Gosh it’s so hard to explain. It doesn’t feel hollow like comparable tweeners I find, particularly on full strokes. Hard serves make the frame feel solid.

Feel definitely is vague and weird on slower swings I find. But ramp up the swing speed and you have an intriguing mix of pocketing you’d associate with flexible frames, a crisp/direct response you’d associate with more modern frames, and the lively response of a modern racquet. It’s really nice for teeing off from the baseline I find.

But words fail me describing this one really, you should demo it for yourself
 

TypeRx

Semi-Pro
Could you elaborate on what you mean by the unique feel?
Here are some of my observations after having played with the Clash Tour for ~6 weeks. This translates into >100 hours as I play quite frequently.
  • It has a VERY muted feel. More than any racket I have played with before. Note I always play with a "Sampras" dampener which further mutes things.
  • You CAN feel the racket flex under certain circumstances. For instance, on shots (esp. 2HBH) hit on the upper half of the head. But you certainly do not feel it all the time.
  • I perceive a very large sweetspot, but interesting that others report they feel the sweetspot is small. Honestly I can hit the ball anywhere on the head without harshness and this was not the case with other rackets -- especially the RF97A. Now, I am not saying off-center harshness equates with sweetspot, but it is a metric IMO.
  • On volleys and touch shots, I can perceive/feel a longer dwell time than other "tweener" rackets. My net game has improved after switching to this racket.
  • The racket is VERY stable, especially given its weight (mine are 338 and 339g strung with dampener and OG, respectively)
  • I don't like the wide-beam construction, but surprisingly the racket cuts through the air without any problem
  • The racket has a reasonable level of power, allowing me to get defensive shots back that would otherwise go into the net
  • It is very head light, which may not be for all. But, I have found I serve better with this racket than what I have been using previously
  • There are times when I do feel like the stringbed plays slightly erratic, but it isn't frequent enough for me to blame anyone but myself
  • It is ultra-comfortable and plush. I can play 5-6 hours in a day with absolutely no elbow fatigue/pain. I have previously suffered from GE.
  • It has a high launch-angle and appears to fare better when I hit with more topspin than trying to hit very flat (SW FH grip)
Now, the above may seem overly optimistic but it is my impression. I still don't believe the Clash Tour is the *perfect* stick as it is definitely not a control frame and the high launch-angle may require slightly different stroke path depending on what you are used to. I also wish the beam width was a little thinner. Finally, I really don't understand the hate it receives by some here (e.g. "its a girl's racket", "only suited for the low-level club player", "if it is so good there would be a lot of pros using it", etc.). Nonsense.

Finally, I have tried the Clash Tour with Wilson Sensation Plus Multi at 55 lbs, Volkl Cyclone 17 at 50 lbs, and my current string setup which is unorthodox (Ash Kev/ZXP at 75/45lbs). With the Multi and Cyclone I still knew I liked the racket and it had a unique feel, but I felt like I had trouble "taming" the somewhat erratic stringbed. With my current string setup that issue is pretty much gone. The biggest factor for me is now my day-to-day variability.

In the past 2 years I have used or given significant demo to the following rackets:
  1. Prince CTS Graduate MP (circa 1988-2002) -- owned
  2. Babolat 2015 Pure Drive + -- owned
  3. Volkl V-Sense 8 315g -- owned
  4. Volkl V-Sense 10 325g -- owned
  5. Wilson RF97A 2018 -- owned
  6. Yonex EZone DR98 + -- demo
  7. Prince Phantom Pro 100p -- demo
  8. Prince Phantom Pro 100 -- demo
  9. Prince Phantom Pro 93p (18x20) -- demo
  10. Babolat Pure Strike 2018 (16x19) -- demo
  11. ProKennex Ki Q+ Tour Pro 325g -- demo
I can say with confidence that the Wilson Clash Tour has a unique feel relative to all of the above. The easiest way to explain it is that it is a very comfortable Pure Drive, but that doesn't really explain the whole thing.

Demo it and see if you agree/disagree with my assessment.
 

mhkeuns

Hall of Fame
Here are some of my observations after having played with the Clash Tour for ~6 weeks. This translates into >100 hours as I play quite frequently.
  • It has a VERY muted feel. More than any racket I have played with before. Note I always play with a "Sampras" dampener which further mutes things.
  • You CAN feel the racket flex under certain circumstances. For instance, on shots (esp. 2HBH) hit on the upper half of the head. But you certainly do not feel it all the time.
  • I perceive a very large sweetspot, but interesting that others report they feel the sweetspot is small. Honestly I can hit the ball anywhere on the head without harshness and this was not the case with other rackets -- especially the RF97A. Now, I am not saying off-center harshness equates with sweetspot, but it is a metric IMO.
  • On volleys and touch shots, I can perceive/feel a longer dwell time than other "tweener" rackets. My net game has improved after switching to this racket.
  • The racket is VERY stable, especially given its weight (mine are 338 and 339g strung with dampener and OG, respectively)
  • I don't like the wide-beam construction, but surprisingly the racket cuts through the air without any problem
  • The racket has a reasonable level of power, allowing me to get defensive shots back that would otherwise go into the net
  • It is very head light, which may not be for all. But, I have found I serve better with this racket than what I have been using previously
  • There are times when I do feel like the stringbed plays slightly erratic, but it isn't frequent enough for me to blame anyone but myself
  • It is ultra-comfortable and plush. I can play 5-6 hours in a day with absolutely no elbow fatigue/pain. I have previously suffered from GE.
  • It has a high launch-angle and appears to fare better when I hit with more topspin than trying to hit very flat (SW FH grip)
Now, the above may seem overly optimistic but it is my impression. I still don't believe the Clash Tour is the *perfect* stick as it is definitely not a control frame and the high launch-angle may require slightly different stroke path depending on what you are used to. I also wish the beam width was a little thinner. Finally, I really don't understand the hate it receives by some here (e.g. "its a girl's racket", "only suited for the low-level club player", "if it is so good there would be a lot of pros using it", etc.). Nonsense.

Finally, I have tried the Clash Tour with Wilson Sensation Plus Multi at 55 lbs, Volkl Cyclone 17 at 50 lbs, and my current string setup which is unorthodox (Ash Kev/ZXP at 75/45lbs). With the Multi and Cyclone I still knew I liked the racket and it had a unique feel, but I felt like I had trouble "taming" the somewhat erratic stringbed. With my current string setup that issue is pretty much gone. The biggest factor for me is now my day-to-day variability.

In the past 2 years I have used or given significant demo to the following rackets:
  1. Prince CTS Graduate MP (circa 1988-2002) -- owned
  2. Babolat 2015 Pure Drive + -- owned
  3. Volkl V-Sense 8 315g -- owned
  4. Volkl V-Sense 10 325g -- owned
  5. Wilson RF97A 2018 -- owned
  6. Yonex EZone DR98 + -- demo
  7. Prince Phantom Pro 100p -- demo
  8. Prince Phantom Pro 100 -- demo
  9. Prince Phantom Pro 93p (18x20) -- demo
  10. Babolat Pure Strike 2018 (16x19) -- demo
  11. ProKennex Ki Q+ Tour Pro 325g -- demo
I can say with confidence that the Wilson Clash Tour has a unique feel relative to all of the above. The easiest way to explain it is that it is a very comfortable Pure Drive, but that doesn't really explain the whole thing.

Demo it and see if you agree/disagree with my assessment.
Thank you for the detailed review. That was awesome.
 

weelie

Semi-Pro
I shortly demoed the lighter Clash today. Strung with Smart at 20kg, I think. It felt and sounded like a thrift store find. :D But while it felt way too light in my hands and was grip size 2 (I usually play like 4)... it played surprisingly solid, ...like I expected it to. I was almost tempted to lead it up, but then thought what the heck, I'll demo the Tour version next time. It did not feel muted to me, not like I remember the DR98 for example, where I felt disconnected, like I did not know if I hit the ball or missed it. And not like some real old rackets like the trampoline Rossignol F300 I played in a couple of doubles matches a year ago. The Clash felt cushioned, but still modern.

Anyway, do not like the look of the racket (the wide body, the boring gray paint scheme), but am really intrigued and could well see myself buying one sometime in the future. After I tested the Clash for a while, went back to my own racket... which felt like home... so I am no hurry to change. :)
 
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Adm

Rookie
Here are some of my observations after having played with the Clash Tour for ~6 weeks. This translates into >100 hours as I play quite frequently.
  • It has a VERY muted feel. More than any racket I have played with before. Note I always play with a "Sampras" dampener which further mutes things.
  • You CAN feel the racket flex under certain circumstances. For instance, on shots (esp. 2HBH) hit on the upper half of the head. But you certainly do not feel it all the time.
  • I perceive a very large sweetspot, but interesting that others report they feel the sweetspot is small. Honestly I can hit the ball anywhere on the head without harshness and this was not the case with other rackets -- especially the RF97A. Now, I am not saying off-center harshness equates with sweetspot, but it is a metric IMO.
  • On volleys and touch shots, I can perceive/feel a longer dwell time than other "tweener" rackets. My net game has improved after switching to this racket.
  • The racket is VERY stable, especially given its weight (mine are 338 and 339g strung with dampener and OG, respectively)
  • I don't like the wide-beam construction, but surprisingly the racket cuts through the air without any problem
  • The racket has a reasonable level of power, allowing me to get defensive shots back that would otherwise go into the net
  • It is very head light, which may not be for all. But, I have found I serve better with this racket than what I have been using previously
  • There are times when I do feel like the stringbed plays slightly erratic, but it isn't frequent enough for me to blame anyone but myself
  • It is ultra-comfortable and plush. I can play 5-6 hours in a day with absolutely no elbow fatigue/pain. I have previously suffered from GE.
  • It has a high launch-angle and appears to fare better when I hit with more topspin than trying to hit very flat (SW FH grip)
Now, the above may seem overly optimistic but it is my impression. I still don't believe the Clash Tour is the *perfect* stick as it is definitely not a control frame and the high launch-angle may require slightly different stroke path depending on what you are used to. I also wish the beam width was a little thinner. Finally, I really don't understand the hate it receives by some here (e.g. "its a girl's racket", "only suited for the low-level club player", "if it is so good there would be a lot of pros using it", etc.). Nonsense.

Finally, I have tried the Clash Tour with Wilson Sensation Plus Multi at 55 lbs, Volkl Cyclone 17 at 50 lbs, and my current string setup which is unorthodox (Ash Kev/ZXP at 75/45lbs). With the Multi and Cyclone I still knew I liked the racket and it had a unique feel, but I felt like I had trouble "taming" the somewhat erratic stringbed. With my current string setup that issue is pretty much gone. The biggest factor for me is now my day-to-day variability.

In the past 2 years I have used or given significant demo to the following rackets:
  1. Prince CTS Graduate MP (circa 1988-2002) -- owned
  2. Babolat 2015 Pure Drive + -- owned
  3. Volkl V-Sense 8 315g -- owned
  4. Volkl V-Sense 10 325g -- owned
  5. Wilson RF97A 2018 -- owned
  6. Yonex EZone DR98 + -- demo
  7. Prince Phantom Pro 100p -- demo
  8. Prince Phantom Pro 100 -- demo
  9. Prince Phantom Pro 93p (18x20) -- demo
  10. Babolat Pure Strike 2018 (16x19) -- demo
  11. ProKennex Ki Q+ Tour Pro 325g -- demo
I can say with confidence that the Wilson Clash Tour has a unique feel relative to all of the above. The easiest way to explain it is that it is a very comfortable Pure Drive, but that doesn't really explain the whole thing.

Demo it and see if you agree/disagree with my assessment.

Thank you for the great review, it is very accurate. I would like to add some comments:

- The racquet feels muted, but it is not the same muted feeling such as Yonex Exone DR 98 or Prince Textreme Tour 95. It is not a high frequency vibration racquet with a hollow feeling that somehow the manufacter muted the "extra noise". Practically, that means that the racquet gives a rich feedback to the player (even if muted) without vibrating, without feeling hollow or brittling.

- You can definetely feel the flexibility of the racquet, big time. But the brilliant thing is that the racquet alters its nature when hitting big, and its flex feels less while its comfort remains remarkable.

- The sweetspot feels remarkably big, this is thanks to the A. high twistweight B. Mass distribution of the racquet C. Uniform vibration feedback no matter where you hit the ball in the string pattern. If the sweetspot feels small in this racquet then I would recommend to check the quality of the stringing job.

- On volleys absolutely true... the dwell time is way longer than most racquets in the market.

- Stability is what makes it an all time unique racquet if you combine it with its weight, flex, and fixed beam width.

Wilson could easily make its RA even lower ( I mean way lower than 40) but that would add negative things to the racquet without adding anything better than what it already has. Instead of that Wilson is using much more meaningful metrics than the RA.

- This racquet needs to have a thick beam...


X The negative thing is that it can feel eratic, but that does not mean that it is an uncontrolable racquet. In each case you can not place it in the same category with control Tour oriented racquets (ex Head Prestige).

* The amazing thing is that players with injuries, they are saved since they use this racquet - even if they have bad tecnique and they have not changed it!


For someone who wants SICK CONTROL I would not recommend the Clash Tour.

For the big majority of players who want a comfortable all round racquet, this is a fantastic choice.

For those who have injuries, this is the best choice (all round racquet) in the market right now; the racquet is ready to play, no need to customize, and super stable.


P.S. If this racquet was produced by HEAD, Volkl or anyone else I would tell you the same things. I just wish that every other company follows the example of Wilson Clash and if possible to bring in the market similar models - competitors of the Clash, it is a good thing for the tennis community.
 
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