Official Wilson Clash thread

Holdfast44ID

Semi-Pro
Leaded up to 322 grams..I previously hit on a racketball court 2X but finally got on court for a practice match in the cold easily winning 6-1,6-1..My opponent is a doubles player with a bad knee...It was a good start to see how the Clash felt in a match..I had lots of set up forehands and was able to put them away with extra zip..My opponent also commented on the extra pace..I remembered reading to swing easier of the serve and that works!! So far so good with my wrist ..But i will next play a better opponent to keep testing the Clash... i am in the GREY FULL PANTS
I might lead mine up as serving felt off for me. Only tried one time. Actually, I think I will go from 48 to 52 or 55 in tension first before considering to add weight. I used to serve up to 130 at my fastest and 120 being my typical fast serve using a much heavier racquet. I am used to being relaxed and using the plow of the racquet on the serve. So it feels weird right now.

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jacob22

Professional
I might lead mine up as serving felt off for me. Only tried one time. Actually, I think I will go from 48 to 52 or 55 in tension first before considering to add weight. I used to serve up to 130 at my fastest and 120 being my typical fast serve using a much heavier racquet. I am used to being relaxed and using the plow of the racquet on the serve. So it feels weird right now.

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130kph?
 

Holdfast44ID

Semi-Pro
Miles per hour. I used to hit much harder with my old 85" ProStaff back in the late 80's/early 90's. The best I ever served was acing a world ranked player three times in a row, with the last two on my second serve (that's why I remember this, lol). I am in my 50's now.

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FuzzyYellowBalls

Hall of Fame
Comeback, why are you leading up the racket, especially with a wrist issue, I don't think you need that extra weight looking at the forehand. Nice points and play, but are you sure the leading up is making you a better player?
 
Oddly enough, I found the response more jarring and uncomfortable this time around. Perhaps more comfy than the Burn and PD, but it's hard to imagine the RA is only 55.
I was surprise at first being it is a wider beam looking frame...

I checked over 5 rackets of both the Tour and 100 on the Flex on our RDC. It came up averaging 54-55 for all of them.
The VCORE 95 which people said felt like butter and good flex was at 61 for us.
 

comeback

Hall of Fame
Comeback, why are you leading up the racket, especially with a wrist issue, I don't think you need that extra weight looking at the forehand. Nice points and play, but are you sure the leading up is making you a better player?
Thanks Fuzzy, I actually only put 1 gram at the tip and changed the grip to a Wilson Shock Shield...The Luxilon NG/ZX adds some weight plus a vibration dampener/head tape..So the Clash is 11oz stock (strung)..Mine is 11.35 oz....It just seemed a little light in stock form..sometimes if it's too light my wrist might hurt also...... so it adds stability
 
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robin1982

Rookie
Comeback, why are you leading up the racket, especially with a wrist issue, I don't think you need that extra weight looking at the forehand. Nice points and play, but are you sure the leading up is making you a better player?
Especially with wrist injuries you have to look at the weight! There are way to many light rackets! If a racket is too light, you use to much your wrist, arm and shoulder. Because of the lack of mass! You need enough mass thats comes through the ball and let the racket do the job! If not? You use your arm..
Just look to all the people with tenniselbows... Big light rackets.. And most of the times very short moves.. All the ingredients to make a perfect tennis elbow... And not even talking about the stringtension which is way to high most of the time...


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PMF

Rookie
I recently demo'd both versions of this racquet and thought they played great. The tour version was strung with Resolve 16g at 51pds, and the regular version was strung with NXT 16g at an unknown tension. I liked the tour version better, but the string on it was a little stiffer than I'm accustomed to, because I usually string my DR98's with gut mains and poly crosses. My wrist and elbow were actually sore after my first hitting session, but thankfully it went away. In my 2nd hitting session, I played in a 4.0 doubles league, and a few people who know my game mentioned my shots were packing a bigger punch with more consistency, but I'm not sure if I really noticed. However, I did notice when I played singles in my 3rd hitting session. I felt very confident going for the corners, and my opponent said he was getting pushed around much more than usual. Several people at my club have already switched to this racquet, but I'm not sure how I feel yet. Still thinking about it. I'm also wondering how the 98 will play. But I can tell you one thing. At my level, I do not wish to play against other people who will be using the Wilson Clash. I anticipate more defensive slap shots will be coming back at me, and I will have to work harder to win points. I might switch just for that reason.
 
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Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
At my level, I do not wish to play against other people who will be using the Wilson Clash. I anticipate more defensive slap shots will be coming back at me, and I will have to work harder to win points. I might switch just for that reason.
Personally most of my competition uses Pure Aeros/Wilson Ultras and puts up with the elbow pain. If they switched to the Clash it might save their arm but lower their power. Now if the guys using the old Prince Exo 3 Tours and Wilson 6.1s switch then I might be in trouble.

There is no lacking of powerful rackets out there. The Clash just happens to be comfortable for its power range.
 

stickM

New User
Have any of you had the opportunity to hit both the prototype and retail versions of the Clash Tour to give your opinion on whether you think it's the identical racquet? I have had the opportunity to hit with the prototype version of the Tour for a few sets and was generally impressed. I thought that my volleys with the Clash Tour were my best ever (both forgiving and accurate), and my only real area of concern was controlling depth when going for put-away forehands. Yes... this was probably just my 4.0 mechanics. This racquet is quite a bit lighter than my Classics and I didn't have the option of adding some weight so I could have a better feeling of where the head was, and the tension on the Alu was 48. Any comment on any perceived differences noted between the Prototype and final retail frame would be appreciated. My racquet of choice has been the Pro Staff 6.1 Classics forever (16m, 18M, and Stretch versions), but I'm at the age where I need something a little lighter and less demanding.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
I went to the Clash Revolution Tour on Friday night. Got a chance to meet Kirby and demoed the Clash and Clash Tour. These are very unique feeling sticks and not in a bad way. They are just different. Comfortable, flexy, yet extremely solid and stable. Easy to generate spin. Good control but doesn’t have the precision of the prestige mp, blade 18/20 or ultra tour. As expected, the open pattern contributes to a higher launch angle. I did not have any major control issues with the frames. The regular Clash was a little light for me so it was coming through a bit too quickly. I believe adding some lead would fix this. I tried the Tour with a full bed of Alu power and the regular version with a full bed of Alu power and an Element/multi hybrid. All were exceptionally comfortable but I preferred the full poly for better control. I won’t be switching over from my Ultra Tour, but I can see this frame selling very well because it’s so comfortable and easy to play with.
 

hurworld

Hall of Fame
I note that the Tennis Brothers from youtube who did the prototype unboxing video did not switch to using the Clash.

From the reviews posted here, sounds like it would be a winner (for me, at least) if they make it 95-98 sq inch head with Tour weight and 18x20 pattern.
 

Dan Huben

Semi-Pro
I got a chance to hit with both the regular and tour version last night. I prefer the tour version as it's a bit more solid. Although I wouldn't really call it a tour at all as it's very much a tweener. The feel is definitely different and needs getting used to. The racquet is flexible but the harder you hit the racquet stiffens up. The racquet is very easy to swing and I think a lot of beginners/intermediate players are gonna love it and will probably switch to it. I think what Wilson is trying to do here is poach the APD/PD players that you see everywhere on the local tennis scene from Babolat with an easy to use racquet that has plenty of easy power but much more arm friendly. The racquet has a lot of power but a surprising amount of control. Although, control is not it's standout point. It's not like you can take a big swing at the ball and expect it to go in type of racquet. I didn't like it too much at net especially during quick volley exchange as I felt the racquet too clunky despite it's low weight and sw. The hoop is so thick that I felt like I was hitting with an oversized racquet, which also makes the sweetspot very generous. Oddly, I found that the racquet totally lacks spin. You'd have to brush up on the ball quite a bit to generate spin. The paintjob is disappointing and very boring. Overall, it was fun hitting with it but it's not the revolutionary racquet that Wilson hyped it up to be. Usually when I enjoy a playtest, I get really excited and can't wait to pick it up and hit with it again. That was not the case with the Clash. It didn't really excite me in any way. It's not something I'd consider switching to as I find that it lacks spin and not enough control. However, I do think Wilson does have a hit on their hand as it's different from the rest of their lineup and they'll sell plenty of these racquets to the beginners/intermediate type players.
my wife plays with a vinyl V1os 104 sqin and I could see she got similar power of the racket when we were hitting harder, the v just gave her more of a drive at lower speeds. When swinging harder, the v gave her more spin, she really had to brush to keep it in and that's not where her game is and likely not where she wants it to go. I could see that she really wanted to like it but it wasn't so different to pull her away
 

FuzzyYellowBalls

Hall of Fame
I note that the Tennis Brothers from youtube who did the prototype unboxing video did not switch to using the Clash.

From the reviews posted here, sounds like it would be a winner (for me, at least) if they make it 95-98 sq inch head with Tour weight and 18x20 pattern.
I think the brothers are a little bit too advanced to use the Clash, it's a tweener, even at 18x20, if you hit full out with advanced strokes, the control won't be there, hence the tennis warehouse reviews I referenced and my own review. It's powerful, like a pure drive, like an aero, too much power unless you need that. Professionals that endorse the power rackets aren't playing with them, they are playing with heavy control rackets, closer to Pure Strikes or ProStaff Autograff or the heavy Yonex Pro. Those brothers won't play with a pro stock racket, but something closer to it than a Clash.
 

Strange hit

New User
Professionals that endorse the power rackets aren't playing with them
So wrong!!! Tons of professionals are playing with real Pure Drive or Aeropro\Pure Aero... On of them won the french open more than 10 times...

It is true though, that some professionals endorse power tweeners racquet while actually playing with control players racquets, but it is far from being an absolute rule.
 

robin1982

Rookie
So wrong!!! Tons of professionals are playing with real Pure Drive or Aeropro\Pure Aero... On of them won the french open more than 10 times...

It is true though, that some professionals endorse power tweeners racquet while actually playing with control players racquets, but it is far from being an absolute rule.
Most of them do play with pro stock models!!
And Nadal plays with the very first edition of the earo pro drive. And customized!
Some brands dont have special pro stocks like Wilson and Head but the frames are customized for them. And some WTA players plays with the exact retail models. And its not a rule, but the most good players play with pro stock models!
 

nvr2old

Hall of Fame
Just got done watching Nicole Gibbs at IW play with her Clash. She played very well. Great match but she lost unfortunately. Can’t compare it with her prior stick though but seemed like she got nice spin but didn’t seem as though she could power ball through court easily. Could be her opponent or just her style though.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Just got done watching Nicole Gibbs at IW play with her Clash. She played very well. Great match but she lost unfortunately. Can’t compare it with her prior stick though but seemed like she got nice spin but didn’t seem as though she could power ball through court easily. Could be her opponent or just her style though.
How do you know it was the Clash and not a PJ?
 

JoelDali

Talk Tennis Guru
Just got done watching Nicole Gibbs at IW play with her Clash. She played very well. Great match but she lost unfortunately. Can’t compare it with her prior stick though but seemed like she got nice spin but didn’t seem as though she could power ball through court easily. Could be her opponent or just her style though.
Her game is definitely improving with a big fresh scoop of Clash and looser strings.

Moar Clash should be distributed to the top 10 in the women’s and men’s tours.

Wilson has a remarkable game changer on their hands at an affordable price point.
 

Adm

Rookie
Hi everyone,

I have play tested both the 100 and 100 tour, I can analyse and write for hours in relation to these 2 frames, but I will try to keep it as short as possible.

The main reason of my review is in order to thank Wilson for providing such a racquet in the market.


Is this racquet revolutionary?

Yes, it is! Why?

Because it is really soft, and it is very stable!

It feels like an old school softy but it is modern and powerful!

As one crazy guy asked in the past traveljam and zalize (about 3 years ago) if is possible to develop a PT57A - soft and plush racquet that plays as a Babolat Pure Drive... well, Wilson has almost done it... I am sure more versions will follow.

It is not a PT57A, and by default it cannot feel the same when you have such a wide beam... but you can understand the revolutionary Wilson concept while playing with it...

Revolutionary! Is that all?

Do you want something more? There is!

The amazing thing is that it plays soft when you hit an easy going shot, and it stiffens up when you go big!

In a few words

It is like this racquet (especially the Tour) is consisted from 2 frames:

1st frame is activated and is very flexible when you hit an easy going shot. Let's say you are a descent player (ATP 1000) and you hit at 50%. This 1st frame will be in charge of the shot by 80-90%.

2nd frame which feels like it is within the 1st is activated when you go bigger... the bigger you go the more stiffness and stability you get. But there is always the 1st frame to absorb the initial shock, and give a higher amplitude regarding the frequency. I would not like to analyze in detail what is going on with the vibration and frequencies in these frames, overall they did fantastic job.

It is revolutionary, it is really fun to play with, it is arm friendly.

Arm friendly is a big thing nowadays... THANK YOU WILSON!


Clash 100 Tour

This is a Tour version, indeed. If you have played with genuine pro stocks you can feel straight away that the mass distribution in this racquet follows a proper (customized by the big guys) Tour Pro Stock... and it is amazing because it a light frame... but it is so stable when you go big.

The twist weight feels amazing. Great blend of control and power. A modern stick, and of course you can adjust the lunch angle with proper strings and stringing method.

No time to analyze every stroke in here, but what you may find interesting is my review regarding the volleys. It felt very different to me.

Volleys

It has the stability of a pure drive... but it is not sparky and does not transfer energy straight away to the ball (the racquet is too flexible).

As a result being super compact (as required let's say with 70+ RA frames) produces short volleys.

Therefore an advanced player has to treat the racquet as a literally old school racquet, and kind of follow through (still shortly - but longer than usual) during this compact volley in order to adjust the "absorbed energy" volley. I guess for a beginner or intermediate player (who are not efficient) it is totally fine at the net kind of straight away.

The racquet is different...

Slices is a dream...

Serves are fantastic.


Clash 100

I have found it too light, but I guess it should be fine for regular recreational players.

Big problem is that if you hit lower in the string pattern you get disproportionally big power, it goes erratic, especially if the stringing job is not ideal. Of course this also has to do with stringing job, but in my review I take into consideration what comes from the strings, what from the frame, and what from the stringer... This frame has not a totally uniform reaction throughout the string pattern especially if you go flatter.

I also have to mention that the Clash 100 (not the Tour version) was strung with Luxilon Smart and dynamic tension at 24...

In a few words

With Luxilon Smart = Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde racquet.

Nevertheless, recreational players who muscle the ball, who try to hit the ball big like Kyrgios in rage forehand mode or the eternally average recreational players... this racquet is just right... The frame stiffens up, the string stiffens up, the overall experience remains big time arm friendly, this stick works wonders for the masses.

All shots are acceptably* fine, taking into consideration the target group.

* Acceptably because it can obviously go erratic, and it takes time... possibly long time (ooohhh, but it is fun) to learn its nature.

The less soft and less experienced hands you have... the more erratic nature it has (unless you are registered - due to lack of competence - to always swing at a specific speed), especially if the string job is not super.

Something more?

Keep in mind that with Luxilon Smart at VERY low tension and Clash 100 .....
The Spins Are Sick!



Disadvantages

- Its price.

- The Clash 100 Tour is one of its kind in the market. Yes, you can find more controllable frames in the market, but its control is acceptable (and nothing else incorporating all these amazing properties of the Tour version at the same time).

- The Clash 100 is light for an advanced player. Is it good for the ordinary recreational player? Yes, it is good... BUT there are alternatives out there. For example Yonex 98 DR or Prince Tour 100T (customized) or 100P, even custom Radical microgel, etc. If you string the racquets that I have mentioned in my examples low then you will get the same power, but with more control, better understanding of how the racquet works, and less erratic moments. These alternative frames are still arm friendly.

- The Clash 100 has too high lunch angle in case you like to play kind of flat, but a good stringer will be able to help you with that.

- The paintjob does not feel durable... (maybe Wilson has a reason? not sure)

- The Clash 100 Tour is a ready to play racquet (no customization for the big majority required - forget you usual racquet stats - these racquets play differently). On the other hand the Clash 100 feels that it needs something... but I will not bother you further with customization options!

Last but not least, it will be interesting to play with the Clash for long time... when you take a very stiff racquet to try back the Stiff Era... ooooohhhh... you will love the responsiveness of the stiff racquet in comparison to the flexibility of the Clash... on the other hand you will realize that the Stiff Racquet is nothing more than a drug (side effects included). If you are into drugs then Wilson Clash has a big disadvantage!


The Clash is good for your health!


Main reason for my review is to say a big THANK YOU to Wilson, and I am sure that more companies will try to catch up.


Please accept my apologies for:

A. my poor English
B. the long review
C. not mentioning details (following the review guidelines of other posts within this forum)
 
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Eh. Haven’t hit with a clash yet, but it sounds like there isn’t really any category in which the donnay hexacore formula doesn’t beat it out. Super arm friendly with sub 60 flex, yet xenecore filling maintains stability in hard shots. Easy playability akin to a pure drive, yet on the more control-oriented side of the spectrum. Even still, perhaps its best attribute is the feel, which it sounds like clash users are saying is a little erratic. Tennisnerd dude did a review on it, but I think he should have given more mention to how delicate things like touch volleys can be with it. I don’t like the amount of confidence Wilson has in charging such a premium price for a product which doesn’t match up, while their competitors are making equally arm-friendly frames with similar playability and build quality for much less.


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Adm

Rookie
I have just watched the video of the dude you mentioned... it is obvious even from the video that we are talking for a babolat pure drive bad copy (ok Donnay guys dropped the RA reading) ... nothing to compare with the Clash.

Eh. Haven’t hit with a clash yet, but it sounds like there isn’t really any category in which the donnay hexacore formula doesn’t beat it out. Super arm friendly with sub 60 flex, yet xenecore filling maintains stability in hard shots. Easy playability akin to a pure drive, yet on the more control-oriented side of the spectrum. Even still, perhaps its best attribute is the feel, which it sounds like clash users are saying is a little erratic. Tennisnerd dude did a review on it, but I think he should have given more mention to how delicate things like touch volleys can be with it. I don’t like the amount of confidence Wilson has in charging such a premium price for a product which doesn’t match up, while their competitors are making equally arm-friendly frames with similar playability and build quality for much less.


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I have not tested the Donnay Hexacore Formula.


But it is way obvious that it is a totally different racquet from the Clash.

The Donnay can not be compared, and placed in the same basket with the Clash simply because Wilson has managed its magic with a constant beam while Donnay is "cheating" with a crazy tapered beam width that drops the RA reading due to the 20mm throat. At the same time the Donnay guys got it at 27mm at 3-9!!! Then they must add "a technology" to silence the beast somehow!

This Donnay can not reach the genius engineering of the Clash, its truly rich and fun nature... and don't get me wrong > the Clash is not an out of control racquet...

The Clash Tour is a tour version, this Donnay can not be.

And I am sure that that the Wilson is 2 steps ahead with the 98 version coming soon... and then another version...
 
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nvr2old

Hall of Fame
How do you know it was the Clash and not a PJ?
Well demoed the frame 2 weeks ago, took note in person of it's obvious very singular beam and throat construction for a Wilson stick, sat in 1st row behind her player seating about 15-20 feet away on the court since it was free admission to IW today for qualifying, and am very observant when it comes to equipment. Guess that'a about it.
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
I have a Clash Tour and I played a guy tonight who had the regular Clash. We're both 4.0 players, but I beat him 6-1. After the match, I suggested to him that he try my racquet to see the difference between the two. We hit a few balls and from the very first stroke he said "WOW"! He said my Tour version felt much more powerful and solid then his regular Clash. I could tell the difference in his shots as well, it was effortless hitting, because the racquet was doing most of the work. I told him about the 60 day guarantee Wilson is offering and that he should exchange his Clash for the Tour version. He agreed and said he'll be switching to the Tour. My Clash Tour is strung with Alu Power at 55lbs. Every time I hit with this racquet, I like it more and more. It's a solid stick, that plays like no other. I'm sure when the 98 version comes out, it'll be a success as well.-
 

Holdfast44ID

Semi-Pro
I have a Clash Tour and I played a guy tonight who had the regular Clash. We're both 4.0 players, but I beat him 6-1. After the match, I suggested to him that he try my racquet to see the difference between the two. We hit a few balls and from the very first stroke he said "WOW"! He said my Tour version felt much more powerful and solid then his regular Clash. I could tell the difference in his shots as well, it was effortless hitting, because the racquet was doing most of the work. I told him about the 60 day guarantee Wilson is offering and that he should exchange his Clash for the Tour version. He agreed and said he'll be switching to the Tour. My Clash Tour is strung with Alu Power at 55lbs. Every time I hit with this racquet, I like it more and more. It's a solid stick, that plays like no other. I'm sure when the 98 version comes out, it'll be a success as well.-
I have a feeling it will feel better with poly at 55 than 48 lbs. I strung my second Tour with X-Perience 17g at 55/53. Since it is raining around here, all I could do was hit a ball into the sofa a few times (before my wife came home as she would yell at me for doing that in the house, haha). Seems it will have a more crisp and controlled power type feel at higher tension. Hey, if it won't bother my arm, I will use it at whatever tension feels best.

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Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
Every time I hit with this racquet, I like it more and more. It's a solid stick, that plays like no other. I'm sure when the 98 version comes out, it'll be a success as well.-
What will be the difference between 98 version and tour 100 ?
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
What will be the difference between 98 version and tour 100 ?

I honestly don’t know, I’m only speculating because of the history of Wilson. I imagine it’ll be 18x20 string pattern and a heavier frame. I do believe it’ll be released later this year. I personally don’t think that Wilson should named the Clash 100 a Tour model. It doesn’t fit the specs to be called a Tour racquet
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
I honestly don’t know, I’m only speculating because of the history of Wilson. I imagine it’ll be 18x20 string pattern and a heavier frame. I do believe it’ll be released later this year. I personally don’t think that Wilson should named the Clash 100 a Tour model. It doesn’t fit the specs to be called a Tour racquet
I play with a heavy low power flexible racquet. Prince Tour 95. Pretty happy with that... Maybe I should wait for the heavy Clash to come out.
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
I play with a heavy low power flexible racquet. Prince Tour 95... Maybe I should wait for the heavy one to come out.
If you’re interested in the Clash, I think that’s a smart move. I went from a Wilson Ultra 100 CV to a Clash Tour, so it wasn’t a difficult transition for me.
 

Adm

Rookie
I play with a heavy low power flexible racquet. Prince Tour 95. Pretty happy with that... Maybe I should wait for the heavy Clash to come out.

You have a fantastic racquet. The Clash Tour is kind of comparable, you can try it straight away. I would suggest not to try to match you usual specs when switching to Clash, it is a different philisophy racquet.
 

robin1982

Rookie
I honestly don’t know, I’m only speculating because of the history of Wilson. I imagine it’ll be 18x20 string pattern and a heavier frame. I do believe it’ll be released later this year. I personally don’t think that Wilson should named the Clash 100 a Tour model. It doesn’t fit the specs to be called a Tour racquet
My test Clash 98 was 310 grams and 16x19 pattern. I hope it will be heavier and 18x20 but dont count on it..


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Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
You have a fantastic racquet. The Clash Tour is kind of comparable, you can try it straight away. I would suggest not to try to match you usual specs when switching to Clash, it is a different philisophy racquet.
Interesting. I suppose Prince Tour 95 is similar to WilsonPro Staff 6.1...It's a little confusing because Wilson had always said that with the flexible "player" racquets like Pro Staff 6.1 you are sacrificing power for more arm comfort and more control. Now I guess the Wilson "stiffness index" guidelines all goes out the window...

Wilson says its TWICE as flexible as the Wilson player racquets!

 
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Adm

Rookie
I honestly don’t know, I’m only speculating because of the history of Wilson. I imagine it’ll be 18x20 string pattern and a heavier frame. I do believe it’ll be released later this year. I personally don’t think that Wilson should named the Clash 100 a Tour model. It doesn’t fit the specs to be called a Tour racquet

TagUrIt,

The wooden tour frames had different specs from the tour frames nowadays...

The Clash is a different racquet, I suggest not look for the "conventional tour racquet stats"...


There is a hint in my review why the Clash Tour is a truly Tour version. I will give some more info.

- Take a proper platform frame that it can turn into a "Tour Version". The proper platform frame has Nature X

- A good customizer, not just good in theory but experienced guy in the Tour with solid background will prepare the Pro Stock, and the new nature of the racquet will usually be Nature X+

- Most of the customization incidents that I read in this forum usually transform Nature X platform racquet into Nature Y racquet, and sometimes if they are lucky into Nature X-


Wilson has provided a frame (Clash Tour) that its nature is right with an excellent mass distribution - you do not need to change it - in contrast to most platform pro stocks that you must create a Nature X + Tour situation. A top customizer, even if he would adjust to the demands of the players (with very subtle alternations) he would still not mess up with the nature of the Clash Tour, the Clash 100 is a different story.
 

Adm

Rookie
Interesting. I suppose Prince Tour 95 is similar to WilsonPro Staff 6.1...It's a little confusing because Wilson had always said that with the flexible "player" racquets like Pro Staff 6.1 you are sacrificing power for more arm comfort and more control. Now I guess "stiffness index" guidelines all goes out the window...
This is why I said comparable, and not the same.

Yes, you are right. The stiffness index as used nowadays goes out the window... and it had too... And this is a reason that Wilson will be thanked in the future... Moving away from RA was about time...
 

Adm

Rookie
Interesting. I suppose Prince Tour 95 is similar to WilsonPro Staff 6.1...It's a little confusing because Wilson had always said that with the flexible "player" racquets like Pro Staff 6.1 you are sacrificing power for more arm comfort and more control. Now I guess the Wilson "stiffness index" guidelines all goes out the window...

Wilson says its TWICE as flexible as the Wilson player racquets!

Keep in mind that the Prince Textreme racquets are not any random racquets, if you remember Prince had to come out in the market with really good frames...

And as I have mentioned in another post there are Wilson competitors who are trying during the last 3 years to produce something such as The Clash.
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
Keep in mind that the Prince Textreme racquets are not any random racquets, if you remember Prince had to come out in the market with really good frames...

And as I have mentioned in another post there are Wilson competitors who are trying during the last 3 years to produce something such as The Clash.
My old Prince Tour 95 is cracked... Is the Textreme Tour 95 the closest thing in the current Prince line?

https://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/T95/T95Review.html
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Well demoed the frame 2 weeks ago, took note in person of it's obvious very singular beam and throat construction for a Wilson stick, sat in 1st row behind her player seating about 15-20 feet away on the court since it was free admission to IW today for qualifying, and am very observant when it comes to equipment. Guess that'a about it.
Since she lost, do you think she will stick with it, pardon the pun? Players are very superstitious. First pro match with this frame resulting in a loss is not going to make a positive impression on other pros either.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
Since she lost, do you think she will stick with it, pardon the pun? Players are very superstitious. First pro match with this frame resulting in a loss is not going to make a positive impression on other pros either.
Wasn’t her first match. Yesterday was the 2nd day of WTA qualifying. She won her first round qualifying match on Monday.
 
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jacob22

Professional
Has anyone been able to lead up this racquet enough to be able to his through the court? Feels good to just practice rally with, but I can't hit accurate flat serves with it, nor put away short balls easily.
 
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