OHBH - Slice

jga111

Hall of Fame
For you backhand slicers out there.

How easy is it for you to slice the ball with it leading to a straight path?

How easy is it for you to slice it with it bending, spinning away after the bounce?

Which one is more natural?

For me its the latter, and I can rarely slice it going straight. It's not a game killer for me because a slice with a less predictable bounce is beneficial. But sometimes I do want to hit it straight and I can't work out exactly what I'm doing wrong, which is annoying! I'm putting it to a natural disposition at the moment.

Would welcome your thoughts on your own personal OHBH slice experiences.

Thanks
 

silversx

New User
my slice always bounces away like federer's drop shots.. people hate it.. i think the trick to slicing straight is to get around the ball more towards the outside
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
I think it's caused by ball height at contact.
Low balls, you swing across and under, causing a DTL backhand chip to run towards the sidelines.
High balls, like over your head, a CROSSCOURT slice runs away from your opponent and towards the sidelines.
And of course, a mid height ball, like around upper chest high, the slice can be pure underspin, skidding to neither side, but more straight vertical off the bounce.
 

10isMaestro

Semi-Pro
For you backhand slicers out there.

How easy is it for you to slice the ball with it leading to a straight path?

How easy is it for you to slice it with it bending, spinning away after the bounce?

Which one is more natural?

For me its the latter, and I can rarely slice it going straight. It's not a game killer for me because a slice with a less predictable bounce is beneficial. But sometimes I do want to hit it straight and I can't work out exactly what I'm doing wrong, which is annoying! I'm putting it to a natural disposition at the moment.

Would welcome your thoughts on your own personal OHBH slice experiences.

Thanks

1. It's not necessary to point out that it is a one handed backhand slice. In contemporary tennis, the overwhelming majority of slices are struck at the baseline, on the backhand side and players perform these shots also overwhelmingly with one hand, even when they hit a two handed top spin backhand. Anything else is exceptional: two handed backhand slices are rare and so are forehand slices. So, next time, just say slice -- and people will assume it's a OHBH slice.
2. You get side spin on the ball because you move your racket side ways a tad around contact. If you catch a bit the outside of the ball as you move down, you tend to carve it toward your dominant side -- i.e., you get back spin and some side spin, causing it move toward your forehand side. Of course, if you make a low contact, you'll get the opposite spin. It's not necessarily a bad thing. What we look for in a good slice is this:
- reliable, accurate, consistent (like any other shot);
- stay low (over the net and after bounce);
- tends to break the pace patterns (it should be slow enough to break the rhythm of heavy hitting).

And, ideally, you should be able to make it a bit flatter and hard, or float it to incommodate your opponent even more depending on his strentghts, weaknesses and the situation. If you can do all of these things, your sidespin is not a problem. If you can't, then it is.
 

Lance L

Semi-Pro
I know what you mean. I've been hitting a one-handed slice my whole life and I believe the curved trajectory comes from not getting a good shoulder turn.

A problem with the one hander is that you can hit it without a good shoulder turn, but you can't hit it well. If you get a shoulder turn, shoulders are parallel with the sideline, you will find you can hit a much more straight shot, a more accurate shot I suppose. If you are late, or just not turning your shoulders, your racquet is going to tend to move left to right and slice the ball sideways.
 
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Easy Rider

Professional
It is more comfortable to hit slices like Federer than like Djokovic. You can transfer greater force hitting like Fed and motion is more relaxed
 
A

Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
If your body is front on facing the target, then you'll get more sidespin and less pace. If you get sideways to the target and get out of the way of the ball, then you can hit through it better with more pace and a straighter path. If you actually step into the shot with your left stepping behind your right foot, then you can get even more pace and directional control, and it'll also get you closer to the net for the volley. Assuming it's an approach shot.
 

Easy Rider

Professional
If your body is front on facing the target, then you'll get more sidespin and less pace. If you get sideways to the target and get out of the way of the ball, then you can hit through it better with more pace and a straighter path. If you actually step into the shot with your left stepping behind your right foot, then you can get even more pace and directional control, and it'll also get you closer to the net for the volley. Assuming it's an approach shot.

I would dissagree on all mentioned above
 

Easy Rider

Professional
First video : Very traditional thing, cant see it even on junior tour

Second video : Carioca step died long time ago.

Feel free to haha as much as you like
 
A

Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
First video : Very traditional thing, cant see it even on junior tour

Second video : Carioca step died long time ago.

Feel free to haha as much as you like

I'm just answering the OP's question by giving the facts. This is how to slice if you want a straight path with pace. If you don't turn sideways enough, you will inevitably come more across the ball, lose pace and add sidespin. Whether you like this kind of slice, is irrelevant, these are the facts. I don't think anybody needs instruction for this stuff cos it's common sense if you play and practice enough, you will work this out for yourself. But I added the videos to demonstrate.

But let's not make this a thread about you and I. Why don't you contribute by giving your own ideas about the slice backhand?
 

Easy Rider

Professional
It is not about you and me from the start. I did explain my thoughts about slicing b4 your post. And when dissagreed with you, I didnt haha at you.

In upper position of the tacket racket face should be open (hit the gas on motorcycle with wrist). On contact racket face is closed (release the gas on motorcycle). Chest to the side fence always while racket after contact goes down and to the side of the body with racket face pointing to the target. That way you can create more force that can be used for more speed or sidespin. Underspin comes naturally cuz you hit from high to low. Better posture, balance, hidden drop shot option is better, less energy consumption.
If you uncoil at some point, dont hit/release the gas, dont hit from highrst to low but lower the racket to somewhat contact level and than go with first forward move, you end up slicing it instead of hitting it with bending in waist level for better directional and height control with low sidespin effect.
 
A

Attila_the_gorilla

Guest
You never clarified what you disagreed with out of what I said. Most likely you're just trolling.

All you said before was a generalized comment about Djokovic and Federer.

The Op gave a specific question about how to make the slice straight, instead of sidespin. Lance and I gave a clear and correct answer and you disagreed without any clarification.
 

Easy Rider

Professional
Ok, than my apologies to OP.
Here it is :

How easy is it for you to slice the ball with it leading to a straight path?

- I can do it but have to be fully concentrated about follow through and it feels weird


How easy is it for you to slice it with it bending, spinning away after the bounce?

- Feels really comfortable and natural


Which one is more natural?

Read my previous posts
 

SystemicAnomaly

Bionic Poster
I have no problem hitting either type of BH slice -- either a straight slice (no sidespin) or your inside-out slice (underspin + sidespin). The swingpath is a bit different for these 2 versions. For the the 1st version, try to swing so that you contact the ball a bit to the outside (see the YES contact below). Chances are that you are dragging the racket from left to right and contacting the inside (NO) part of the ball.
2006_04_18_effective_slice_2.jpg

Note: If you contact far enough to the outside of the ball, you might get the ball to curve the other way (outside-in). You might even get some extra spiral spin to get the ball to bounce more to the side. However, if you attempt to contact slightly to the outside of the ball, you should be able to get a true slice (little of no sidespin).

The article below talks about the idea about contact the outside rather than the inside of the ball.

http://www.active.com/tennis/articles/keys-to-an-effective-backhand-slice
http://www.active.com/tennis/articles/keys-to-an-effective-backhand-slice?page=2
 
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jga111

Hall of Fame
Thanks for your input guys, much appreciated. I'm going to make a focus on rotating my shoulder more for the slice and try and get contact on that outside edge. Even though my slice twirls slightly, its very effective but I want to be able to control it and make it do what I want it to do! Have a game tomorrow with someone who has the best spin/kicker-service game i've seen in club tennis so I need that weapon to be active, especially on his serve as I plan to cut in early (wrote a thread on this guys game a while back - and will be employing the advice you gave me then!).

Many Thanks.
 
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