OK, Now the Nonsense Starts in the Parking Lot

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
I played a match at an indoor facility (DMV folks, think Metroplex). For whatever reason, some genius decided to build it this facility with insufficient parking in a remote part of the county despite its location on a huge parcel of land.

When I arrived for my match about 10 minutes ahead, there were no open spots. Luckily, I saw someone walk to their mini-van and buckle in a child. I put on my blinker and waited patiently for the person to leave so I could take their spot. The driver got in, and I soon saw his face lit by his cell phone. Well, OK. I can chill while he checks his phone.

After a minute or two, he hadn't left or looked up. Maybe he is engrossed in his phone and doesn't know I'm waiting? I got out of my car and knocked on his window, whereupon we had the following conversation:

"Hi, are you leaving?"

"Not yet."

"Oh. I have a match starting soon, and all of the other spots are taken. Could I have your spot?"

"No. I'm waiting for my son."

So I got back in my car, drove to the adjacent empty skating rink parking lot, parked under a street lamp for safety, walked across the muddy field and into the tennis facility. Upon the completion of my match, I walked back across the muddy field at 11 p.m. to the empty skating rink lot, relieved not to have encountered any ne'er-do-wells lurking nearby.

Come on. Had I been this guy, I would 100% have moved my car out out of the spot and then just sat there, moving out of the way if I was blocking anyone or taking another spot if one became available.

When I got back in my car, a thought occurred to me: Just abandon my car directly in front of his; go in and tell my captain I was there; use the bathroom; then go move my car, by which time there would almost certainly be an open spot. The prevalence of lunatics in this country caused me to think better of it.
 
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I played a match at an indoor facility (DMV folks, think Metroplex). For whatever reason, some genius decided to build it this facility with insufficient parking in a remote part of the county despite its location on a huge parcel of land.

When I arrived for my match about 10 minutes ahead, there were no open spots. Luckily, I saw someone walk to their mini-van and buckle in a child. I put on my blinker and waited patiently for the person to leave so I could take their spot. The driver got in, and I soon saw his face lit by his cell phone. Well, OK. I can chill while he checks his phone.

After a minute or two, he hadn't left or looked up. Maybe he is engrossed in his phone and doesn't know I'm waiting? I got out of my car and knocked on his window, whereupon we had the following conversation:

"Hi, are you leaving?"

"Not yet."

"Oh. I have a match starting soon, and all of the other spots are taken. Could I have your spot?"

"No. I'm waiting for my son."

So I got back in my car, drove to the adjacent empty skating rink parking lot, parked under a street lamp for safety, walked across the muddy field and into the tennis facility. Upon the completion of my match, I walked back across the muddy field at 11 p.m. to the empty skating rink lot, relieved not to have encountered any ne'er-do-wells lurking nearby.

Come on. Had I been this guy, I would 100% have moved my car out out of the spot and then just sat there, moving out of the way if I was blocking anyone or taking another spot if one became available.

When I got back in my car, a thought occurred to me: Just abandon my car directly in front of his; go in and tell my captain I was there; use the bathroom; then go move my car, by which time there would almost certainly be an open spot. The prevalence of lunatics in this country caused me to think better of it.
Giving him the benefit of the doubt, maybe I would have asked one more question: "Could you pull out and wait for your son so I can have the spot? It's a win-win: you're still roughly in the same spot and I get to park."

Hopefully, most people would take a second to consider this, realize you're right, and agree.

Some are too lazy or inconsiderate and view any request as too burdensome. I'm sure if he was the one waiting, he would have gotten upset if the parked guy did not yield his spot.

Come to think of it, self-centered people like this are generally lousy doubles partners because they're only thinking of what's most convenient/best for them, not for the team.
 

silentkman

Semi-Pro
I played a match at an indoor facility (DMV folks, think Metroplex). For whatever reason, some genius decided to build it this facility with insufficient parking in a remote part of the county despite its location on a huge parcel of land.

When I arrived for my match about 10 minutes ahead, there were no open spots. Luckily, I saw someone walk to their mini-van and buckle in a child. I put on my blinker and waited patiently for the person to leave so I could take their spot. The driver got in, and I soon saw his face lit by his cell phone. Well, OK. I can chill while he checks his phone.

After a minute or two, he hadn't left or looked up. Maybe he is engrossed in his phone and doesn't know I'm waiting? I got out of my car and knocked on his window, whereupon we had the following conversation:

"Hi, are you leaving?"

"Not yet."

"Oh. I have a match starting soon, and all of the other spots are taken. Could I have your spot?"

"No. I'm waiting for my son."

So I got back in my car, drove to the adjacent empty skating rink parking lot, parked under a street lamp for safety, walked across the muddy field and into the tennis facility. Upon the completion of my match, I walked back across the muddy field at 11 p.m. to the empty skating rink lot, relieved not to have encountered any ne'er-do-wells lurking nearby.

Come on. Had I been this guy, I would 100% have moved my car out out of the spot and then just sat there, moving out of the way if I was blocking anyone or taking another spot if one became available.

When I got back in my car, a thought occurred to me: Just abandon my car directly in front of his; go in and tell my captain I was there; use the bathroom; then go move my car, by which time there would almost certainly be an open spot. The prevalence of lunatics in this country caused me to think better of it.
You always have to aware of parking in each facility you play at. Why didn't you arrive earlier? whenI played, allplayers arrived 30 minutes before the match. As the captain, i would arrived 45 minutes before.
 

silentkman

Semi-Pro
I always allow more time. Except when I can't. On account of how I work for a living.
Cmon, most people on the board work for a living as well. I live a hour or more or way from my office. If I had a match, i would come in a bit early so that i could be on time. I was never late for match. I Would never play a match that I would have concerns about the time. I'm sorry your issue is not one.
 

Fairhit

Professional
I don't know, excuse but maybe you guys see things under another light where you live but if someone is using a parking spot it is theirs no matter what and I don't see anything wrong with him staying in the spot he has, he could do a favor by moving but is not a rude thing not to.
 

mucat

Hall of Fame
It is his spot, his choice and he seems to be using the parking spot properly...it is not like he is double parking or parking his donkey.
But he should have signal you that he was not ready to leave yet (assuming he saw you).
 
Cmon, most people on the board work for a living as well. I live a hour or more or way from my office. If I had a match, i would come in a bit early so that i could be on time. I was never late for match. I Would never play a match that I would have concerns about the time. I'm sorry your issue is not one.
So you've never been less than 30 minutes early? There's never been an emergency at the office? A traffic jam/accident?

Life happens. it's great if you're perfect in your attendance but I'm not going to fault someone for imperfection. [It's a different matter if they are habitually late.]
 
I don't know, excuse but maybe you guys see things under another light where you live but if someone is using a parking spot it is theirs no matter what and I don't see anything wrong with him staying in the spot he has, he could do a favor by moving but is not a rude thing not to.
Technically, you're right. Mr. Parked does not have to give up his spot. He also doesn't have to open the door for someone or help with a load or tell someone they dropped their wallet or...I guess it depends on one's view of the social norms.
 

Fairhit

Professional
Technically, you're right. Mr. Parked does not have to give up his spot. He also doesn't have to open the door for someone or help with a load or tell someone they dropped their wallet or...I guess it depends on one's view of the social norms.
Is not the same, if she goes to him and explains the situation he has a choice to make, he could've helped or not but if he decides he's not giving up his spot is not something that can be judged but by posting this thread OP is judging his behavior when he did nothing wrong, he was waiting for his son to finish practice, if the OP were to just vent I would get it, it's frustrating but it is on her because she didn't arrived on time, in this case the culprit is a guy that was waiting for his son to finish his practice, a little entitled to me.
 
Is not the same, if she goes to him and explains the situation he has a choice to make, he could've helped or not but if he decides he's not giving up his spot is not something that can be judged but by posting this thread OP is judging his behavior when he did nothing wrong, he was waiting for his son to finish practice, if the OP were to just vent I would get it, it's frustrating but it is on her because she didn't arrived on time, in this case the culprit is a guy that was waiting for his son to finish his practice, a little entitled to me.
The point of comparing Mr. Parked with the other situations is that none of them required any great effort on his part [well, maybe helping with a load]. He could have vacated the spot, let Cindy park and then moved right back behind Cindy to continue waiting for his son. It didn't require him to leave the parking lot or even start circling the parking lot. For the 30 seconds it would have taken, he would have been in the roughly same position to wait for his son and Cindy would have avoided trekking across the field. Win-win, in my book.

Was it his right to stay put? Sure. Did Cindy slash his tires or put sugar in his gas tank or put a boot on his wheel? No.

If I was in her place, I would have been a bit miffed also, even if it was my fault that I wasn't early. My line of thinking would be "It would have taken you almost no effort, you still would have accomplished your goal, and you would have helped me but you chose not to."

You're saying you would not be miffed?

[Edit] if his son wasn't coming out for some time, then I could see him not wanting to be parked in the aisle. But if that was the case, he probably would have said so. Therefore, I assume this was not the case [and I could be dead wrong].
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
Dunno. When I was picking up a son or daughter, I've always taken great care to be where I was expected at the right time. I doubt I would jeopardize their trust or safety for the convenience of a tennis player who planned poorly.

If there was somewhere I could wait and complete the pick-up easily without delay or risk to my son or daughter, I may have done it. But the OP pointed out it was a shady neighborhood, so I'm not making my own son or daughter wait even 30 seconds longer in a shady neighbor for the convenience of a stranger to make her tennis thing.
 

r2473

Talk Tennis Guru
I played a match at an indoor facility (DMV folks, think Metroplex). For whatever reason, some genius decided to build it this facility with insufficient parking in a remote part of the county despite its location on a huge parcel of land.

When I arrived for my match about 10 minutes ahead, there were no open spots. Luckily, I saw someone walk to their mini-van and buckle in a child. I put on my blinker and waited patiently for the person to leave so I could take their spot. The driver got in, and I soon saw his face lit by his cell phone. Well, OK. I can chill while he checks his phone.

After a minute or two, he hadn't left or looked up. Maybe he is engrossed in his phone and doesn't know I'm waiting? I got out of my car and knocked on his window, whereupon we had the following conversation:

"Hi, are you leaving?"

"Not yet."

"Oh. I have a match starting soon, and all of the other spots are taken. Could I have your spot?"

"No. I'm waiting for my son."

So I got back in my car, drove to the adjacent empty skating rink parking lot, parked under a street lamp for safety, walked across the muddy field and into the tennis facility. Upon the completion of my match, I walked back across the muddy field at 11 p.m. to the empty skating rink lot, relieved not to have encountered any ne'er-do-wells lurking nearby.

Come on. Had I been this guy, I would 100% have moved my car out out of the spot and then just sat there, moving out of the way if I was blocking anyone or taking another spot if one became available.

When I got back in my car, a thought occurred to me: Just abandon my car directly in front of his; go in and tell my captain I was there; use the bathroom; then go move my car, by which time there would almost certainly be an open spot. The prevalence of lunatics in this country caused me to think better of it.
I was in “Mr Parked’s” situation before. And I moved to one of 3 open handicap spots, stayed in the car and left it running. I must have had 10 different people scream at me and tell me to get out of the handicapped spot in the 5 minutes I was waiting.

But there was no other place to sit and wait unless I wanted to block traffic
 
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Dunno. When I was picking up a son or daughter, I've always taken great care to be where I was expected at the right time. I doubt I would jeopardize their trust or safety for the convenience of a tennis player who planned poorly.

If there was somewhere I could wait and complete the pick-up easily without delay or risk to my son or daughter, I may have done it. But the OP pointed out it was a shady neighborhood, so I'm not making my own son or daughter wait even 30 seconds longer in a shady neighbor for the convenience of a stranger to make her tennis thing.
Are you jeapordizing their safety? It's not like you would have been forced to leave the lot. Instead of in the parking spot, you would have been behind that car. So you would have been 10-15' away.

And if the area was really that shady, would you let your kid walk from the facility to the car?
 

Fairhit

Professional
The point of comparing Mr. Parked with the other situations is that none of them required any great effort on his part [well, maybe helping with a load]. He could have vacated the spot, let Cindy park and then moved right back behind Cindy to continue waiting for his son. It didn't require him to leave the parking lot or even start circling the parking lot. For the 30 seconds it would have taken, he would have been in the roughly same position to wait for his son and Cindy would have avoided trekking across the field. Win-win, in my book.

Was it his right to stay put? Sure. Did Cindy slash his tires or put sugar in his gas tank or put a boot on his wheel? No.

If I was in her place, I would have been a bit miffed also, even if it was my fault that I wasn't early. My line of thinking would be "It would have taken you almost no effort, you still would have accomplished your goal, and you would have helped me but you chose not to."

You're saying you would not be miffed?

[Edit] if his son wasn't coming out for some time, then I could see him not wanting to be parked in the aisle. But if that was the case, he probably would have said so. Therefore, I assume this was not the case [and I could be dead wrong].
We don't know how much he had to wait for his son, is easier to think I would have been seconds only so we can judge him for being unhelpful but the reality is that we don't know how much he had to wait.

Are you jeapordizing their safety? It's not like you would have been forced to leave the lot. Instead of in the parking spot, you would have been behind that car. So you would have been 10-15' away.

And if the area was really that shady, would you let your kid walk from the facility to the car?
He had two children, maybe it was the safer option, maybe he was waiting for practice to finish so he could go back and get his son, the point again is that we don't know, what we do know is that Cindy arrived late and felt this guy had to give up his space because it was more convenient for her regardless of if it was convenient for the guy and his two children.

Anyway, if I'm waiting in a certain spot for my child I wouldn't want to move from there if it wasn't an urgent situation, in this case it wasn't.
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
Are you jeapordizing their safety? It's not like you would have been forced to leave the lot. Instead of in the parking spot, you would have been behind that car. So you would have been 10-15' away.

And if the area was really that shady, would you let your kid walk from the facility to the car?
Once they were teens, they usually walked from the building to the car if I could see them the whole way and it was well lit. But a lot comes down to the set-up for an alternate spot to wait. If I'm behind a legally parked vehicle, but not legally parked myself, can I still see the entrance from which my son or daughter will appear? In that location, am I obstructing the flow of traffic? Will remaining there indefinitely be a problem? What if my son or daughter does not show on time? How do I then go in and look around for them?

I was the parent taxi literally hundreds of times. Maybe thousands. About 10% of the time, unexpected stuff happens that requires the parent to go in and handle something. Harder to do if the parent has relinquished the last legal parking spot in the lot.
 
Once they were teens, they usually walked from the building to the car if I could see them the whole way and it was well lit. But a lot comes down to the set-up for an alternate spot to wait. If I'm behind a legally parked vehicle, but not legally parked myself, can I still see the entrance from which my son or daughter will appear? In that location, am I obstructing the flow of traffic? Will remaining there indefinitely be a problem? What if my son or daughter does not show on time? How do I then go in and look around for them?

I was the parent taxi literally hundreds of times. Maybe thousands. About 10% of the time, unexpected stuff happens that requires the parent to go in and handle something. Harder to do if the parent has relinquished the last legal parking spot in the lot.
Fair enough.
 
We don't know how much he had to wait for his son, is easier to think I would have been seconds only so we can judge him for being unhelpful but the reality is that we don't know how much he had to wait.


He had two children, maybe it was the safer option, maybe he was waiting for practice to finish so he could go back and get his son, the point again is that we don't know, what we do know is that Cindy arrived late and felt this guy had to give up his space because it was more convenient for her regardless of if it was convenient for the guy and his two children.

Anyway, if I'm waiting in a certain spot for my child I wouldn't want to move from there if it wasn't an urgent situation, in this case it wasn't.
Yeah, I see that viewpoint also.
 

ChrisG

Semi-Pro
This thread is hilarious. From the “property right on a parking spot” to the “safety of my children” argument, oh and I forget “mr I’m never never never late to any kind of event of my life”, you guys gave me a reason to live another day to witness human nature at his finest !
 

Flootoo

Rookie
As someone who feels guilty for parking in a 1-hour spot when I know I'm only going to be a few minutes, who passes on the paid parking sticker, and who will ALWAYS hover rather than taking up a spot if waiting for someone, I can only imagine this driver had some sort of drama going on and had to write a message on his phone, and couldn't afford the mental space to deal with your reasonable suggestion.
 

Fxanimator1

Hall of Fame
Life happens...deal. No one is entitled to anything. What’s the next thread, the horror of stepping on someone’s gum left on the sidewalk?
 

Rubens

Hall of Fame
The guy broke the 2-seconds rule. If you go back to your parked car, you have to free up the parking spot within 2 seconds. It is forbidden to stay in your parked car for whatever reason. How dare he.
 

Matthew ATX

Semi-Pro
Such dramatics in here. Breaking their trust if you're not in the exact spot they think you'll be in? Having to see your teenage children the entire way from car to door? Do y'all live in Kabul and are dropping your kids off under sniper fire?

I'm glad my parents weren't like that. Yeesh.
 

TennisDawg

Professional
Mr. Parked was not obligated to Cindy, but he could have decided to be kind and let this stranger have the spot. It would have helped her out and made her day a little easier and wouldn’t inconvenienced him a whole lot, well other than having to get off his
cell phone for a bit. It’s not like she was preventing him from picking up his son. Possibly, maybe Cindy repays a simple favor to another stranger. Instead she’s miffed about this and writes it on TT. “Pay it forward” right!
 
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Turbo-87

Legend
This kind of stuff would be great for the Court of Appeals in Tennis magazine. Life is too short to get worked up over trivial things. I only came here because I 1) thought it was a dgold44 thread and 2) there may have been a fight.
 

zaskar1

Semi-Pro
I played a match at an indoor facility (DMV folks, think Metroplex). For whatever reason, some genius decided to build it this facility with insufficient parking in a remote part of the county despite its location on a huge parcel of land.

When I arrived for my match about 10 minutes ahead, there were no open spots. Luckily, I saw someone walk to their mini-van and buckle in a child. I put on my blinker and waited patiently for the person to leave so I could take their spot. The driver got in, and I soon saw his face lit by his cell phone. Well, OK. I can chill while he checks his phone.

After a minute or two, he hadn't left or looked up. Maybe he is engrossed in his phone and doesn't know I'm waiting? I got out of my car and knocked on his window, whereupon we had the following conversation:

"Hi, are you leaving?"

"Not yet."

"Oh. I have a match starting soon, and all of the other spots are taken. Could I have your spot?"

"No. I'm waiting for my son."

So I got back in my car, drove to the adjacent empty skating rink parking lot, parked under a street lamp for safety, walked across the muddy field and into the tennis facility. Upon the completion of my match, I walked back across the muddy field at 11 p.m. to the empty skating rink lot, relieved not to have encountered any ne'er-do-wells lurking nearby.

Come on. Had I been this guy, I would 100% have moved my car out out of the spot and then just sat there, moving out of the way if I was blocking anyone or taking another spot if one became available.

When I got back in my car, a thought occurred to me: Just abandon my car directly in front of his; go in and tell my captain I was there; use the bathroom; then go move my car, by which time there would almost certainly be an open spot. The prevalence of lunatics in this country caused me to think better of it.
CS
sorry to hear that this guy was obviously not a league player, and did not sympathize with the fact that you were trying to be on time for your tennis match. i guess society has gotten to "only i matter" attitude. just chalk it up to experience and hopefully future interactions with other people will be more positive.
hopefully at your match the opponents didnt "hook" you on their linecalls
z
 

jered

Rookie
I’m baffled at so many people defending the OP’s outrageous sense of privilege. You ask someone to give up their parking spot in a completely full lot when they are not ready to leave and then get upset they won’t do it? Crazy pills! The reason he wasn’t leaving is irrelevant. The spot isn’t available. Asking to take the spot when he wasn’t ready to leave is pretty ballsy, too. OP was rude IMO.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
I played a match at an indoor facility (DMV folks, think Metroplex). For whatever reason, some genius decided to build it this facility with insufficient parking in a remote part of the county despite its location on a huge parcel of land.

When I arrived for my match about 10 minutes ahead, there were no open spots. Luckily, I saw someone walk to their mini-van and buckle in a child. I put on my blinker and waited patiently for the person to leave so I could take their spot. The driver got in, and I soon saw his face lit by his cell phone. Well, OK. I can chill while he checks his phone.

After a minute or two, he hadn't left or looked up. Maybe he is engrossed in his phone and doesn't know I'm waiting? I got out of my car and knocked on his window, whereupon we had the following conversation:

"Hi, are you leaving?"

"Not yet."

"Oh. I have a match starting soon, and all of the other spots are taken. Could I have your spot?"

"No. I'm waiting for my son."

So I got back in my car, drove to the adjacent empty skating rink parking lot, parked under a street lamp for safety, walked across the muddy field and into the tennis facility. Upon the completion of my match, I walked back across the muddy field at 11 p.m. to the empty skating rink lot, relieved not to have encountered any ne'er-do-wells lurking nearby.

Come on. Had I been this guy, I would 100% have moved my car out out of the spot and then just sat there, moving out of the way if I was blocking anyone or taking another spot if one became available.

When I got back in my car, a thought occurred to me: Just abandon my car directly in front of his; go in and tell my captain I was there; use the bathroom; then go move my car, by which time there would almost certainly be an open spot. The prevalence of lunatics in this country caused me to think better of it.
take Uber. problem solved
 

Fairhit

Professional
I’m baffled at so many people defending the OP’s outrageous sense of privilege. You ask someone to give up their parking spot in a completely full lot when they are not ready to leave and then get upset they won’t do it? Crazy pills! The reason he wasn’t leaving is irrelevant. The spot isn’t available. Asking to take the spot when he wasn’t ready to leave is pretty ballsy, too. OP was rude IMO.
Entitled.
 

Scoop

Rookie
This is a lot of hoopla about nothing.

Parked guy - sure he could have been more accommodating.

Time crunched Cindy - could have realized it's not his obligation to move for her just because she's running late.

This is pretty standard life stuff. I don't understand why drama is created out of nothing.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
I played a match at an indoor facility (DMV folks, think Metroplex). For whatever reason, some genius decided to build it this facility with insufficient parking in a remote part of the county despite its location on a huge parcel of land.

When I arrived for my match about 10 minutes ahead, there were no open spots. Luckily, I saw someone walk to their mini-van and buckle in a child. I put on my blinker and waited patiently for the person to leave so I could take their spot. The driver got in, and I soon saw his face lit by his cell phone. Well, OK. I can chill while he checks his phone.

After a minute or two, he hadn't left or looked up. Maybe he is engrossed in his phone and doesn't know I'm waiting? I got out of my car and knocked on his window, whereupon we had the following conversation:

"Hi, are you leaving?"

"Not yet."

"Oh. I have a match starting soon, and all of the other spots are taken. Could I have your spot?"

"No. I'm waiting for my son."

So I got back in my car, drove to the adjacent empty skating rink parking lot, parked under a street lamp for safety, walked across the muddy field and into the tennis facility. Upon the completion of my match, I walked back across the muddy field at 11 p.m. to the empty skating rink lot, relieved not to have encountered any ne'er-do-wells lurking nearby.

Come on. Had I been this guy, I would 100% have moved my car out out of the spot and then just sat there, moving out of the way if I was blocking anyone or taking another spot if one became available.

When I got back in my car, a thought occurred to me: Just abandon my car directly in front of his; go in and tell my captain I was there; use the bathroom; then go move my car, by which time there would almost certainly be an open spot. The prevalence of lunatics in this country caused me to think better of it.
He did the right thing. You're not supposed to wait on the pavement which is reserved for moving traffic, not waiting cars. Waiting cars on pavement create their own problems for people entering or leaving or pulling out of parking spaces

Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
It's simple really.

People can choose to be nice about things, or they can choose not to be. He chose not to be.

That makes him not nice. There's no law that says anyone has to be nice.

And . . . if I caught one of my adult children refusing to give someone a parking spot under these circumstances, I would scold them good. I would certainly hope I raised them with a bit more consideration for others, and my disappointment in them would be palpable.

Cindy -- who also gives up her seat on the train for people in greater need, even though she doesn't have to and even if they don't ask
 
I don't understand why drama is created out of nothing.
Slow news day...compared to impeachment hearings it's pretty entertaining...real-life drama outside the beltway. I had drama of equal gravity until I found a shirt I could wear untucked.
 
Oh yeah, how'd the match go? Maybe the parkee was a shill planted by the home team to get into OP's head to cause stress and game penalty for delay?
 

mucat

Hall of Fame
OP, he might not do nice to you (give up his parking space to a stranger) but he was doing nice thing to his son (waiting for his son close by).
Also, he is not doing anything rude to you. If you are genuinely asking him, 'no' should be an acceptable answer as well. Otherwise, you might as well demand him to leave.
 

Fairhit

Professional
It's simple really.

People can choose to be nice about things, or they can choose not to be. He chose not to be.

That makes him not nice. There's no law that says anyone has to be nice.

And . . . if I caught one of my adult children refusing to give someone a parking spot under these circumstances, I would scold them good. I would certainly hope I raised them with a bit more consideration for others, and my disappointment in them would be palpable.

Cindy -- who also gives up her seat on the train for people in greater need, even though she doesn't have to and even if they don't ask
You're biased, that guy can be telling the story about a person who demanded him to leave his parking spot regardless of his child.

Is not the same thing as to give your seat in the bus or train, you're judging him because you assume he did not give you his spot out of lack of manners or because he was rude but in reality you don't know anything about his situation and even if he didn't want to give up the spot, he didn't have to.

If I ever caught my children being this entitled I will scold them so hard.
 

jered

Rookie
It's simple really.

People can choose to be nice about things, or they can choose not to be. He chose not to be.

That makes him not nice. There's no law that says anyone has to be nice.

And . . . if I caught one of my adult children refusing to give someone a parking spot under these circumstances, I would scold them good. I would certainly hope I raised them with a bit more consideration for others, and my disappointment in them would be palpable.

Cindy -- who also gives up her seat on the train for people in greater need, even though she doesn't have to and even if they don't ask
Wow, the lack of self awareness is stunning.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
People can choose to be nice about things, or they can choose not to be. He chose not to be.
‘Nice’ being defined here as ‘acquiescing to what is convenient for me’.

You’re not really in a position here to judge whether he or you were in greater need. It’s fairly normal for someone who is picking up children to not want to double park, lest they need to leave the vehicle and go in search of them.

Perhaps you should suggest to your club that they institute ‘League Players’ parking spaces, to go with the Disabled and Parents With Prams spots. I dare say such a suggestion will get the consideration it deserves.
 

Flootoo

Rookie
This kind of stuff would be great for the Court of Appeals in Tennis magazine. Life is too short to get worked up over trivial things. I only came here because I 1) thought it was a dgold44 thread and 2) there may have been a fight.
It sounds like he was actually involved.... lol
 
I have some empathy for the OP, no harm in asking, and the "parkee" could have been more forthcoming as to why he needed to remain in the space. I would have probably moved but I don't have any kids to pick-up, maybe diapers to change, or other extenuating circumstances creating a need to remain parked. The "parkee" could have been more sympathetic to the OP's plight in explaining his overriding needs to remain parked.
 
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