Old fat guys and late beginners?

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
#1
You know the threads, it's either I'm X years old and Y pounds overweight and have a bad knee and a cranky back and a dodgy shoulder but I'm rededicating myself to tennis because I used to be good or option B I'm X years old and played casually as a kid and in high school but never had any formal training but now I'm going to do whatever it takes to get to 5.5.

My question is has anyone ever done it?

Come on guys, share your success stories with us.

J
 
#5
Well I'm 53 and 20 lbs overweight and started dedicating myself to tennis 2 years ago. And guess what, I'm barely better than I was when I started. In league I've gone from being a bad court 3 player to a bad court 2 player. Which would probably be the USTA equivalent of going from weak 3.5 to decent 3.5. I've developed more shots and better court coverage. But there is no way on God's green earth that i can see myself getting to 4.0 let alone 5.5.

I still believe your final resting place in tennis is 90% innate athleticism and 10% hard work. Every 5.0 guy I've witnessed has been a high level athlete and can do virtually any sport well provided it requires a modicum of hand eye coordination. No exceptions.
 
#6
You know the threads, it's either I'm X years old and Y pounds overweight and have a bad knee and a cranky back and a dodgy shoulder but I'm rededicating myself to tennis because I used to be good or option B I'm X years old and played casually as a kid and in high school but never had any formal training but now I'm going to do whatever it takes to get to 5.5.

My question is has anyone ever done it?

Come on guys, share your success stories with us.

J
Set him straight @TimeToPlaySets
 
#9
No amount of stroke development will ever compensate for being immobile.
I've played guys with nice strokes who are almost cripple.
They will never ever get beyond 3.0

Your strokes mean zero if you can't move.
If you can't move, you're playing the wrong sport.
At the least, stick to doubles.

I've met guys who can't move 2 steps, but are 4.0 dubs players.
In singles, I would just drop shot and always hit DTL where they are not, even if bunting.

Lose the weight.
Spend 6 months dedicated to diet and extreme fitness.
 
#10
You think Pete Sampras, that skinny nerd dweeb, is some kind of super athlete?
I bet he can't even shoot a basketball, or hit a baseball.

Tennis is 90% technique. I've seen it first hand.
Division 1 baseball and football players will get bageled by a 3.5
They don't even know how to hold the racket.

Tennis is a game of learned technique.
This is why experienced 60 year olds can bagel a clueless 20 year old Div1 athlete.

If you are a clumsy oaf with zero athletic intuition base,
then yea, you will suck at tennis.

But, there is MASSIVE room for improvement, assuming you have basic ability.
 
#11
No amount of stroke development will ever compensate for being immobile.
Lose the weight.
Spend 6 months dedicated to diet and extreme fitness.
Tennis is 90% technique. I've seen it first hand.
Division 1 baseball and football players will get bageled by a 3.5
They don't even know how to hold the racket.
I know I must be dense, but why do these seem to be directly contradictory?
 
#12
I think tennis is far too physical sport to take on late and get serious, if you haven’t had a sporting life before getting on or back to tennis.

I’ve taken golf my first priority some 10 years ago and am now a solid tournament player. No big wins yet though, but in the mix. Tennis is my second best at the moment, but sailing, I think would be my best option to get back into. Trouble is, it so freaking expensive, if you wish to have competetive boat and good crew.

Ok, it may have been a bit extreme, but I attended a presentation of VandéeGlobe 2020-project. Really a small budget and not as competitive boat as I would like to have, and it was just a 2.5 M€, $3 million project and requires some 3 years prep to convince the organizers, that you are up to the task of sailing single-handed non-stop around the globe.

But, I have a 1hbh...

Anyway, making good progress on my tennis too and looking forward to be in the mix at 55’s in National Championships four years ahead.

And yes, I started tennis at the age of 7, but got off this stupid sports in my teens, cause people, who would’ve won me anyway cheated on line calls. I thought this is a sport of cons and crooks, s-hitty comp sport with no referees to put things straight, if people cannot by themselves. And till this day I believe the same.

Most seniors make foot faults and call on-line shots out and so forth. If you play for a cup, you should have some integrity and respect, if not for your opponent, for the game.
——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 
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Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
#15
You think Pete Sampras, that skinny nerd dweeb, is some kind of super athlete?
I bet he can't even shoot a basketball, or hit a baseball.
Tell us more oh wise one:

http://www.sportstarlive.com/column...y-athletes-and-athleticism/article9066055.ece

"
2. TENNIS

On his trademark slam-dunk overhead, 1990s superstar Pete Sampras once crowed, “This white boy can jump.” He and other extraordinary tennis athletes like Rod Laver, Martina Navratilova, Billie Jean King, Serena Williams, Steffi Graf, Rafael Nadal, Bjorn Borg and Roger Federer could do a lot more than jump.

“In tennis, you need everything,” Sampras averred. “You need durability, hand-eye coordination and mental endurance because it’s a one-on-one sport. There’s no help from your coach or manager or anyone out there. Tennis players are tremendous athletes, some of the best in the world. In some ways, it’s even more difficult to play tennis than to play in the NBA. There are no substitutions, no halftimes to recover. You definitely see someone’s true character on the tennis court.”

Tennis is also one of the very few sports that require both aerobic and anaerobic conditioning. Finally, the athleticism of tennis is showcased on three very different surfaces — grass, clay, and hard courts —and often in 90-degree heat."
 
#16
You know the threads, it's either I'm X years old and Y pounds overweight and have a bad knee and a cranky back and a dodgy shoulder but I'm rededicating myself to tennis because I used to be good or option B I'm X years old and played casually as a kid and in high school but never had any formal training but now I'm going to do whatever it takes to get to 5.5.

My question is has anyone ever done it?

Come on guys, share your success stories with us.

J

I kind of did that. Never played tennis as a kid or in highschool or college. Started very late. I am now mid 50.

I have only been playing tennis for about 5 years, but was a pro athlete in another ball sport. I started my tennis taking lessons with a very good pro (former US open player), only working on strokes for the first year, never played outside my training sessions. I only needed to learn tennis the proper way and not change homemade strokes. I was treated like a kid who they would teach how to play tennis like they teach the juniors. So my strokes are modern style, 2 hand backhand because I never tried anything else.

I lost weight about 30 pounds, got in shape, could still loos 5-10 pounds. That made a really big difference.

I ran into a lot of injuries because I was impatience and going too fast, so also a lot of setbacks.

The last two years I have been working with a world class pro, I have put in the hours (3 sessions a week) and also playing with friends 2-3 times a week. Improving a lot, I guess a key element is that I only have to learn new things not unlearn or change old bad habbits. Now I can play with very good players, like young former challenger players, top junior players and strong 5.5 players.

My level is now a good 5.0, but I guess that is proberly my max. If I need to improve more is is my fitness I need to focus on, BUT age kicks in and Is is difficult.

My strokes are very solid, I move very well, but cant compete with the young strong guys in their 30, I am simply not fast enough. I tell you balls comes really really fast, solid and with precition, unlike most videos you see in this forum.

My coach tells me that it takes 5 years to make a player and 10 years to make a competetative player.

I am now entering the competitions, and my training is not focus on strokes anymore, but more on playing patters, footwork, shot selections in any given moment. I work on tacticts and also on the mental game (however I am strong here due to beeing a former pro athlete)

SO I guess it is possible to become a 5.5 player, but for me I might max out at 5.0, but time will tell.

I enjoy every moment, and it is such a kick to improve at a sport even when you are past 50. My advice is to get a good coach (pro) put in the hours, make a plan with the coach on how to improve and stick to that plan, and lose weight (prevent injury, and makes you a faster player)

Cheers, Toby
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
#17
I kind of did that. Never played tennis as a kid or in highschool or college. Started very late. I am now mid 50.

I have only been playing tennis for about 5 years, but was a pro athlete in another ball sport. I started my tennis taking lessons with a very good pro (former US open player), only working on strokes for the first year, never played outside my training sessions. I only needed to learn tennis the proper way and not change homemade strokes. I was treated like a kid who they would teach how to play tennis like they teach the juniors. So my strokes are modern style, 2 hand backhand because I never tried anything else.

I lost weight about 30 pounds, got in shape, could still loos 5-10 pounds. That made a really big difference.

I ran into a lot of injuries because I was impatience and going too fast, so also a lot of setbacks.

The last two years I have been working with a world class pro, I have put in the hours (3 sessions a week) and also playing with friends 2-3 times a week. Improving a lot, I guess a key element is that I only have to learn new things not unlearn or change old bad habbits. Now I can play with very good players, like young former challenger players, top junior players and strong 5.5 players.

My level is now a good 5.0, but I guess that is proberly my max. If I need to improve more is is my fitness I need to focus on, BUT age kicks in and Is is difficult.

My strokes are very solid, I move very well, but cant compete with the young strong guys in their 30, I am simply not fast enough. I tell you balls comes really really fast, solid and with precition, unlike most videos you see in this forum.

My coach tells me that it takes 5 years to make a player and 10 years to make a competetative player.

I am now entering the competitions, and my training is not focus on strokes anymore, but more on playing patters, footwork, shot selections in any given moment. I work on tacticts and also on the mental game (however I am strong here due to beeing a former pro athlete)

SO I guess it is possible to become a 5.5 player, but for me I might max out at 5.0, but time will tell.

I enjoy every moment, and it is such a kick to improve at a sport even when you are past 50. My advice is to get a good coach (pro) put in the hours, make a plan with the coach on how to improve and stick to that plan, and lose weight (prevent injury, and makes you a faster player)

Cheers, Toby
That's an awesome story, congrats on your improvement.

Did you feel like because you spent a long time working on strokes and not competing that your match results lagged behind your potential? That happened to me.

What is your UTR?

J
 

norcal

Hall of Fame
#20
And yes, I started tennis at the age of 7, but got off this stupid sports in my teens, cause people, who would’ve won me anyway cheated on line calls. I thought this is a sport of cons and crooks, s-hitty comp sport with no referees to put things straight, if people cannot by themselves. And till this day I believe the same.

Most seniors make foot faults and call on-line shots out and so forth. If you play for a cup, you should have some integrity and respect, if not for your opponent, for the game.
——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
You're not wrong about cheating, did you know that here in the US, college matches play 'let' serves because so many players would just call a 'let' on their opponents winning serve? Cheating was so rampant they had to take that temptation away. Pretty sad.
 
#21
That's an awesome story, congrats on your improvement.

Did you feel like because you spent a long time working on strokes and not competing that your match results lagged behind your potential? That happened to me.

What is your UTR?

J
Yes for sure. But that did not frustrate me that much, as I knew results would come later with experience. Part of the problem was that I was only training with very good players (much better than me) with solid modern technique and I got use to that kind of play. I struggled for a while when facing players with a different game. I have respect for pushers, junkballers and such as they were difficult to play and I would overhit. Coach told mento just keep the ball in play with solid strokes and wait for a sitter, and that kept UFE down.

I am in Europe, so nut sure what UTR are. I sometimes travel to the US and would love to hit with TT members and make friends, I will post next time I come to the US to find hitting partners.

Jolly, I enjoy your post and racquet thread.

Cheers, Toby
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
#22
Yes for sure. But that did not frustrate me that much, as I knew results would come later with experience. Part of the problem was that I was only training with very good players (much better than me) with solid modern technique and I got use to that kind of play. I struggled for a while when facing players with a different game. I have respect for pushers, junkballers and such as they were difficult to play and I would overhit. Coach told mento just keep the ball in play with solid strokes and wait for a sitter, and that kept UFE down.

I am in Europe, so nut sure what UTR are. I sometimes travel to the US and would love to hit with TT members and make friends, I will post next time I come to the US to find hitting partners.

Jolly, I enjoy your post and racquet thread.

Cheers, Toby
Very cool.

UTR is a global universal rating.

myutr.com

If you have played competition you may be listed. It's a good way to track your progress.

J
 
#23
Toby has what most Jo wilfrid Ollie refers to don’t. He’s a former pro ball player. And I may have too, yet only a fighter pilot by occupation, retired now for many years with some severe health issues due to my job.

People, who never had professional sports background lack the understanding, what hard work means and they expect too much.

Yet my occupation was in the military, I used to be a national team athlete in juniors, sailing in an Olympic class dingy. The amount of work, and dedication you put into reaching your dreams, yet so many fail and never reach the peak, is enormous. If you haven’t had that desire and urge to compete in your early - teen years, you cannot comprehend and never will understand, how much effort it takes to get there.

It is really easy to admire someone. But to really see all it takes, no way. You give up everything else, yet you do not feel anything was lost till later. It is really easy to find out, what others were doing, while you were out on the sea or lake for practice, day in day out. You’d go to school, and rush to the beach hoist your sails and get out. Return really late in the evening, night even and in the morning to school. Same, same, same over and over again with your weight jacket on and off to brush off the small deficits in your execution in tacking, jibing...

Lot of work put into it, yet it never felt a burdain, cause you loved, what you did.


——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 
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#24
Very cool.

UTR is a global universal rating.

myutr.com

If you have played competition you may be listed. It's a good way to track your progress.

J
To me tennis has been kind of “zen in the art of archery”, I did so much competition in my former sport, and eveything was about winning. I wanted something else, try something new, different midset, loev of the game, not compeeting but learning.

As now becomming a player (like my coach said, it takes 5 years to make a player), I now feel it is time to start playing the game of tennis (takes 10 years to make a competative player). I am exited, and a whole new world is opening up.

So far I have no license, I have only played small local club turnament.

This summer I will get a licence, and start compeeting in turnaments +55 and others. I know it will take time to become a good competative player (I hope less than 5 years, or I will only be competative at +60

I am looking forward to new adventures, but I am kins of still in zen mode and dont care too much if I loose to players with worse stroke than mine. I hope ith experience I will will the year after, I have patience as I am improving.

Such a wonderful sport, you meet great people who become new friends, my only regrets is that I started too late.

Cheers, Toby
 
#25
Toby has what most Jo wilfrid Ollie refers to don’t. He’s a former pro ball player. And I may have too, yet only a fighter pilot by occupation, retired now for many years with some severe health issues due to my job.

People, who never had professional sports background lack the understanding, what hard work means and they expect too much.

Yet my occupation was in the military, I used to be a national team athlete in juniors, sailing in an Olympic class dingy. The amount of work, and dedication you put into reaching your dreams, yet so many failand never reach the peak, is enormous. If you havent had that desire and urge to compete in your early - teen years, you cannot comprehend and never will understand, how much effort it takes to get there.

It is really easy to admire someone. But to really see all it takes, no way. You give up everything else, yet you do not feel anything was lost till later. It is really easy to find out, what others were doing, while you were out on the sea or lake for practice, day in day out. You’d go to school, and rush to the beach hoist your sails and get out. Return really late in the evening, night even and in the morning to school. Same, same, same over and over again with your weight jacket on and off to brush off the small deficits in your execution in tacking, jibing...

Lot of work put into it, yet it never felt a burdain, cause you loved, what you did.


——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
Great post

Sailing is such a great sport. After my career ended I took 6 month off sailing with friends in the South Pacific around Solomon Island, Vanuatu and Fiji - when you are out there fighting the element, it is a life changing experience. We did not have a gps so we navigated by sextant. Great time.

Enjoy, Toby
 
#26
Jolly:

This is a great thread. I have been playing for about 5-6 years but over the last two years really making an effort to move up. I have lost 100lbs, (349 now 248) and am working on fitness/movement more than anything else. 5 years ago I was a strong 3.5 almost got bumped. I then went through divorce, gained weight, and started loosing. I actually got bumped down 2 years ago to 3.0 and that was the final straw for me. Definitely still carry some mental baggage that I am working through. But was the same for me when I was kid wrestling. Lost every match for 2 years then lost one in 3 and was ranked top 10 in nation for my weight class. I know I have to get to the point I expect to win.

I currently am ranked 3.5, but struggle with playing less clean players (like above poster respect pushers). I am told I have 4.5 ground strokes and serve - and constantly am accused of "sandbagging" to be 3.5, but I still get tight and loose matches I definitely should win. Will see how this season goes, it will be my first real test but I typically split sets when playing 4.0 and 4.

I will let you know how things go. I think 4.0 is realistic, 4.5 if I loose some more weight and get a little fitter and father time doesn't hurt me too much (46yo). I do hit with a pro who is hitting partner for many of the WTA Americans. He says- my ground strokes are stronger on both wings than those players, and serves are significantly stronger. But they have butter movement and consistency.

So I work on shot tolerance and movement all the time now. Will let you know how it goes.
 
#27
I know I must be dense, but why do these seem to be directly contradictory?
Yes, you are very dense if you can't understand something so basic.

Imagine Sampras with his legs cut off.
Do you think you can beat him?

Imagine Michael Jordan, who doesn't even know how to hold the racket.
Do you think you can beat him?
 
#29
Tell us more oh wise one:


http://www.sportstarlive.com/column...y-athletes-and-athleticism/article9066055.ece

"
2. TENNIS

On his trademark slam-dunk overhead, 1990s superstar Pete Sampras once crowed, “This white boy can jump.” He and other extraordinary tennis athletes like Rod Laver, Martina Navratilova, Billie Jean King, Serena Williams, Steffi Graf, Rafael Nadal, Bjorn Borg and Roger Federer could do a lot more than jump.

“In tennis, you need everything,” Sampras averred. “You need durability, hand-eye coordination and mental endurance because it’s a one-on-one sport. There’s no help from your coach or manager or anyone out there. Tennis players are tremendous athletes, some of the best in the world. In some ways, it’s even more difficult to play tennis than to play in the NBA. There are no substitutions, no halftimes to recover. You definitely see someone’s true character on the tennis court.”

Tennis is also one of the very few sports that require both aerobic and anaerobic conditioning. Finally, the athleticism of tennis is showcased on three very different surfaces — grass, clay, and hard courts —and often in 90-degree heat."
There is a difference between potential and actually realizing that potential.
This is why Sampras can serve faster than a body builder who is 5x stronger.

Basic.
 
#31
Yes, you are very dense if you can't understand something so basic.

Imagine Sampras with his legs cut off.
Do you think you can beat him?

Imagine Michael Jordan, who doesn't even know how to hold the racket.
Do you think you can beat him?

Come on TimeToPlaySets, lets have some positive vibrations here - we do not grow on negative stuff.

This is a great place (I am even improving in writing English), I enjoy the good people here, but these dogfights is not necessary - you win

Peace, Toby
 
#32
Jolly:

This is a great thread. I have been playing for about 5-6 years but over the last two years really making an effort to move up. I have lost 100lbs, (349 now 248) and am working on fitness/movement more than anything else. 5 years ago I was a strong 3.5 almost got bumped. I then went through divorce, gained weight, and started loosing. I actually got bumped down 2 years ago to 3.0 and that was the final straw for me. Definitely still carry some mental baggage that I am working through. But was the same for me when I was kid wrestling. Lost every match for 2 years then lost one in 3 and was ranked top 10 in nation for my weight class. I know I have to get to the point I expect to win.

I currently am ranked 3.5, but struggle with playing less clean players (like above poster respect pushers). I am told I have 4.5 ground strokes and serve - and constantly am accused of "sandbagging" to be 3.5, but I still get tight and loose matches I definitely should win. Will see how this season goes, it will be my first real test but I typically split sets when playing 4.0 and 4.

I will let you know how things go. I think 4.0 is realistic, 4.5 if I loose some more weight and get a little fitter and father time doesn't hurt me too much (46yo). I do hit with a pro who is hitting partner for many of the WTA Americans. He says- my ground strokes are stronger on both wings than those players, and serves are significantly stronger. But they have butter movement and consistency.

So I work on shot tolerance and movement all the time now. Will let you know how it goes.
A comp sports is not possible to do successfully, if your mind is on devorce or any other issues in life. Fact.

Rushing off from work to play a set or two, and you under achieve by a mile. Hitting and rallying will do in any circumstances, but to play a comp set, no. You need to be at the task at hand and not distracted by other issues. Most of us cannot shut off life, the minute a game starts.


——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 
#33
You know the threads, it's either I'm X years old and Y pounds overweight and have a bad knee and a cranky back and a dodgy shoulder but I'm rededicating myself to tennis because I used to be good or option B I'm X years old and played casually as a kid and in high school but never had any formal training but now I'm going to do whatever it takes to get to 5.5.

My question is has anyone ever done it?

Come on guys, share your success stories with us.
I moved quickly from 3.5 to 4.0 and was doing well to get to 4.5....and then got hurt, got fatter, got hurter, and got worser.

I gave up until I retire in a few years. Then we will see. I've said a bunch of times, I am registered with the ITF Seniors and plan to play when I can. At least to say I did it.

Then end.
 

nvr2old

Professional
#35
Well I’m 61 and weigh 150 after losing 35 pounds a couple of years ago. As I’ve stated before I return to tennis about a year ago after not playing for probably the least 35 years. I grew up playing when I was very young took lessons at a park and rec at eight years old and played till I was about 25 mostly casually. Never played in high school or college in an organized fashion because I was playing baseball which conflicted with tennis and also played football. I play multiple sports and consider myself to have excellent hand eye coordination . I played college baseball and actually had a tryout with the Angels which again I’ve mentioned here. Currently I play golf, race motocross, ride road and mountain bikes, used to ski and am very active. When I first came back last year to tennis things fell into place really quickly in terms of my strokes. I had at that time thought I’d like to get to USTA 5.0 level and maybe play tournaments. My Achilles’ heel however it is a completely ruptured left PCL playing baseball about 40!years ago. Until tennis it had never really bothered me. But I have a lot of laxity in the leg and the forward and backward as well side to side movement of tennis on a hard court has really caused what I assume is arthritis to flareup. As such I can only play about 4-5 sets a week at the most and I have to give the leg quite a break after this. I suspect this would be a limiting factor in serious tournament play so I really think that likely I will never get to 5.0 or be able to sustain enough tournament time or practice time to go any higher. I still plan on entering some tournaments fun. As a side note I’ve noticed that if you try to rank yourself as a senior players above say proximally 50 to 55 years old without results that about the highest you can rate is about a 3.5. That’s not surprising because I think the assumption is that at that age that even if you have the skill set or had the skill set that physical limitations such as movement would limit your game.
 
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#37
On his heels and defending already.

Well, some take these forum things way too seriously and get stranded.

I’ve noticed, there are allways some, who put on their helmets on and drop their gloves right from the start and really dig into others posts to find even a minor harrasment to attack back.

Have been a victim many times on golf boards, cause have so wide athletetic approach and often lack the sports precise vocabularly.


——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 
#38
There is a difference between potential and actually realizing that potential.
This is why Sampras can serve faster than a body builder who is 5x stronger.

Basic.
Not quite so. Cause tennis strokes are not all about strength, but sequencing - spelling rythm.

You may hit as hard as you can, put all the 5x’s into the shot, but still gain no ball speed.

There was an intrview on a top golfer, Ernie Els. Big guy and goes by the nick name ”Big Easy”. He was once asked on an interview, how he can hit the ball so far with putting so little effort into the shot.

The answer was: - I hit it as hard as I can.

Doesn’t look like much of an effort, but since all perfectly in sync and happening at the right time in the sequence, it looks effortless.
——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 
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#40
Take a look at the last year of my posting. In 100% of the cases, I am the one who is attacked first. I am just reacting as any one would. Have a nice day
Just turn the other cheek when beeing attacked - be kind - dont start attacking your self - be proactive and positive in the forum and you will gain respect.

Remember for others just reading the dogfights finds it boresome and not constructive, does not really do anyone any good.

Have a great day too
 

sredna42

Professional
#44
I started tennis at the age of 7, but got off this stupid sports in my teens, cause people, who would’ve won me anyway cheated on line calls. I thought this is a sport of cons and crooks, s-hitty comp sport with no referees to put things straight, if people cannot by themselves. And till this day I believe the same.

Most seniors make foot faults and call on-line shots out and so forth. If you play for a cup, you should have some integrity and respect, if not for your opponent, for the game.
Sad to report that this holds true where I play also.
The most frustrating part to me is that right at the crucial moments they will do it, the good ones, right when you hit that winner at break point that lands near the baseline and you can't see it, though you know off the racquet that it was good. It's gotten to the point, if the point is a big one and I hit a deep shot, I'm already wondering to myself as the shot is in the air if they are going to hook me, the pattern is becoming that obvious.

But they will act like they are your best friend, want to talk to you about your life, the footy, tell you that you hit a great shot at other times, and put on a show of being normal people.

When I give up tennis, this is going to be a major contributing factor
 
#45
I started my tennis taking lessons with a very good pro (former US open player), only working on strokes for the first year, never played outside my training sessions.
I only needed to learn tennis the proper way and not change homemade strokes.

The last two years I have been working with a world class pro, I have put in the hours (3 sessions a week) and also playing with friends 2-3 times a week.
I only have to learn new things not unlearn or change old bad habbits.
You have identified THE biggest factor in learning to play "real" tennis.
You did it right, like the juniors. Almost no one does this.
They would have to spend months or years breaking down all the bad self-taught natural habits.
I did this, and it was WORK. And money. And time.
But, it's been totally worth it. I never thought I would be this good.
Complete transformation that very few will ever do.
Most are stuck for decades with broken strokes.
 
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#46
You have identified THE biggest factor in learning to play "real" tennis.
You did it right, like the juniors. Almost no one does this.
They would have to spend months or years breaking down all the bad self-taught natural habits.
I did this, and it was WORK. And money. And time.
But, it's been totally worth it. I never thought I would be this good.
Complete transformation that very few will ever do.
Most are stuck for decades with broken strokes.
Why not STFU and just beat your opponents instead of preaching?!
 
#47
You have identified THE biggest factor in learning to play "real" tennis.
You did it right, like the juniors. Almost no one does this.
They would have to spend months or years breaking down all the bad self-taught natural habits.
I did this, and it was WORK. And money. And time.
But, it's been totally worth it. I never thought I would be this good.
Complete transformation that very few will ever do.
Most are stuck for decades with broken strokes.
So are you ranked in the ATP now? I thought you just did lessons last year.
 
#48
Thank you for this and for mentioning your feelings about tennis.

Although I will never likely acheive anything much past a competent 4.0 level at my age, I am deeply proud of where I am nonetheless. I work hard and work to improve (and have seen enormous improvement in the 18 months I have been back playing), and that brings deep satisfaction.

But, I also find true joy on the court. I love the poetry of a well played match, the beauty of a well designed point, the elation and the sorrow that plays itself out in a deuce game. I can become quite meta-physical about the game.
 
#49
[QUOTE="J011yroger, post:
UTR is a global universal rating.
[/QUOTE]

Yep. Just like all the other “World Series” that has no concept of the rest of the world :)
 
#50
I played with a guy who's about 30 years old and took up tennis 5 years ago. He was one of the best college hockey goalies in the country, had an outside shot of making the NHL. He started playing because his girlfriend (now his wife) played #1 singles for an Ivy League school and taught him how to play. He only plays for fun, but he would do well in a 4.5 league. Bad serve but incredible return; he returned my serve better than most 5.0s do. Which is unsurprising considering his background.
 
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