One Handed Backhand Racquet

Pure Babs

Rookie
I might be switching to a one handed backhand pretty soon. I was wondering those of you with one handed backhands, are there especially good racquets for one handers, or it does it really not matter?
 

RoddickAce

Hall of Fame
I'm not sure of what racquets are especially good for 1-handers, but I think the more flexible it is, the better it is for a 1 handed backhand.
 

beckham

Semi-Pro
I hit both a one and two handed backhand, and prefer a Aerogel 300. I've added a lot of lead tape to make it heavier to increase the swing weight and "plow through". IMO for a one handed backhand, I don't believe the racquet matters to much, but I would lean on a heavier racquet with more mass for increased racquet acceleration and drive through the ball.
 

skyzoo

Banned
K(90). I don't have a one hander except when i'm using that racquet. The racquet will change your style of play though. beware
 

steve728

Rookie
K(90). I don't have a one hander except when i'm using that racquet. The racquet will change your style of play though. beware

Totally agree. One-handed topspin and slice backhands are incredible with this racquet --- has both the "plow through" weight and the smaller head.
 

Automatix

Legend
I might be switching to a one handed backhand pretty soon. I was wondering those of you with one handed backhands, are there especially good racquets for one handers, or it does it really not matter?

Headsize: 98 or less
Length: 27 inches

A small headed standard length racquet makes playing a 1hbh easier. That of course doesn't mean it's impossible with let's say 28 inch frames... it's just more difficult.

Some examples...
Henin - 27,5 inch frame, 95 sq. inch with head heavy balance.
Federer - 27 inch frame, 90 sq. inch with head light balance.
O. Rochus - 28 inch frame, 95 sq. inch with head light balance.
Blake - 27 inch frame, 97 sq. inch with head light balance.
Haas - 27 inch frame, 630cm2 with head light balance.
Mauresmo - 27 inch frame, 98 sq. inch with head light balance.
 

lobolouie

New User
If you are just switching over to a 1hbh, then i would stick to rackets with these specs:

-27 inch length
-At least 62 stiffness
-Swing Weight 300-320 (need some mass to block, but not too much so that you can't get the racket head around on time).
-18x20 pattern: you will be hitting more flat balls in the beginning and this pattern is beneficial in control of those shots.
-Head light balance, at least 5 points. The heavier you go, the more HL you want the racket.
 

Dave M

Hall of Fame
I used to use a pure drive and have always played on handed.I think i find the aegel 100 easier but ont buy a new racket first, see if you have a good enough 1hbh to justify switching, then see if you can play ell with what you have.
 

steve728

Rookie
Yup. I wonder what january will hold for us with the new models......


I hope something very similar to the K90 but just a bit lighter stock. By the time I put on OG, rubberband dampener, and a "heavier" string setup (like natural gut or a NG/poly hybrid), my K90 can balloon to the the 12.7 - 12.8 oz range.
 

prjacobs

Hall of Fame
I think that a thin frame allows you to close the face of the racquet more and that will help in generating topspin. Personally, I prefer an open pattern for all of my strokes.
 
I have a guy at the tennis center where I play who is a legit 4.0-4.5, and hits a one handed backhand and uses a 120 square inch head. The Wilson Ncode N1. And no, he's not a pusher, he rips the cover off the ball on all strokes, and hits the sickest drop volleys ever. So racquet has no bearing on your strokes, learn the technique to hit the shot better. I hit the one hander, and PREFER a very stiff racquet.
 

paulorenzo

Hall of Fame
K(90). I don't have a one hander except when i'm using that racquet. The racquet will change your style of play though. beware

never thought of that until now, but you're right. faster headspeed on every stroke is essential.

backhand is solid on the k90, and one can do alot with it, regarding variety, hitting from an awkward position, and/or coming up with dipping passes in the clutch, but the kps88 has more plow through, and is more solid.
 

In D Zone

Hall of Fame
Its all about the technique.

You'll have to demo some racquet to find out what's good for you. Each player varies on racquet preference. Some like heavier frame while others prefer lighter but head heavy frames. Just too much intangibles to consider.

Another factor is how strong and comfortable are you - can you play with a 12oz or above frame even over an hour of hitting?
 
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JRstriker12

Hall of Fame
I hit both a one and two handed backhand, and prefer a Aerogel 300. I've added a lot of lead tape to make it heavier to increase the swing weight and "plow through". IMO for a one handed backhand, I don't believe the racquet matters to much, but I would lean on a heavier racquet with more mass for increased racquet acceleration and drive through the ball.

Agreed - more technique than racket.

I play with a Pure Drive Roddick and it works fine with my one-hander.

I would try to find something with a little bit of weight with it though, as that extra mass can help your get through the ball.

I wouldn't limit yourself to 98 or under - and 100+ sq inch racket works just fine and may give you a more margin for error.
 

JRstriker12

Hall of Fame
I might be switching to a one handed backhand pretty soon. I was wondering those of you with one handed backhands, are there especially good racquets for one handers, or it does it really not matter?

Question -

What do you play with now and why switch to a one hander?
 

rostro

New User
I will suggest Dunlop Aerogel 4D 300 Tour or Head Microgel Prestige...These are similer rackets and very good for one handed backhand...If you want more power you can go with a 16-19 pattern similar rackets...
 

palmerop

Rookie
I'm going to revive this thread. I'm a 3.5, I play a 1hbh and I would like some demo recommendations please. I'd like something a bit more stable but still manuvabrle. Any suggestions are welcome!
 

Weaverpsu

New User
I just

Switched to a 1hbh this year and kept same racquet. Thinking of buying another now that my backhand is finally getting consistent. I don't think it is necessary to buy a new racquet before you begin process.
 

anirut

Legend
If you want just "satisfaction from playing" (results out of discussion): the smaller the head the better.

In today's term, that's anything 90 sq.in or less.

BTW, Volkl's and Becker's 93 sq.in head sizes included.
 

Tennisguy777

Professional
I will suggest Dunlop Aerogel 4D 300 Tour or Head Microgel Prestige...These are similer rackets and very good for one handed backhand...If you want more power you can go with a 16-19 pattern similar rackets...

The Aerogel 4D 300 tour is a great racquet but without lead tape at 3 and 9 o'clock it is not so great. The prestige is awesome.
 

Lavs

Hall of Fame
Why nobody mentioned C10 Pro?
90% of pros who used to use it are OHBH players (Mac, Dent, Dancevic, etc)
 
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palmerop

Rookie
All these recommended frames seem to be above my skill level (3.5), at least according to what's written in TW's reviews... BTW I am not switching to a OHBH, I've always had a OHBH as they didn't teach two-handed backhands back in the days in my small province town in Italy... unfortunately.
 

JackB1

G.O.A.T.
I used to think this, but its nonsense really. You can hit a one hander with any racquet. Plus, you are going to hit 75% forehands anyway, so why get a racquet that won't benefit what you hit most. I would stick with whatever works best for your complete game: serve, forehand, backhand, everything. I had a guy on our doubles team that used a Prince Blue 110" head racquet and he ripped 1 handers like nobody's business.

Get the technique down and get a racquet for your entire game...not one stroke. JMO.
 

palmerop

Rookie
I used to think this, but its nonsense really. You can hit a one hander with any racquet. Plus, you are going to hit 75% forehands anyway, so why get a racquet that won't benefit what you hit most. I would stick with whatever works best for your complete game: serve, forehand, backhand, everything. I had a guy on our doubles team that used a Prince Blue 110" head racquet and he ripped 1 handers like nobody's business.

Get the technique down and get a racquet for your entire game...not one stroke. JMO.

Thanks, appreciated!
 

palmerop

Rookie
I used to think this, but its nonsense really. You can hit a one hander with any racquet. Plus, you are going to hit 75% forehands anyway, so why get a racquet that won't benefit what you hit most. I would stick with whatever works best for your complete game: serve, forehand, backhand, everything. I had a guy on our doubles team that used a Prince Blue 110" head racquet and he ripped 1 handers like nobody's business.

Get the technique down and get a racquet for your entire game...not one stroke. JMO.

The reason why I asked this question is that my bh is my weakest shot and getting that better would improve my overall game...
 

JRstriker12

Hall of Fame
The reason why I asked this question is that my bh is my weakest shot and getting that better would improve my overall game...

IHMO - practice would probably do more good than a new stick, unless your stick is just totally unsuitable for your game.

Another thing to consider is that in general most players have a weaker wing and you need to form a strategy about how to work around this. For example, my forehand will always be my go-to shot. My backhand has improved but there's no way it will be better or as good as my forehand, so I worked to become as consistent as possible off the backhand side and look to set up points to hit mostly forehands.

As far as rackets go, I find most sticks with a mostly headlight balance and the most static weight you are comfortable handling will do the job - I recently play tested the most recent Babolat APD, Babolat Pure Storm, Dunlop Biomimetic 400 and Tour 400, Head Radical, Pure Drive Roddick+ and they would all do the job for the most part. But I found myself going back to my old trusty Prestiges.
 

drak

Hall of Fame
My opinion is that grip size is an important consideration in a one-hander as opposed to a two hander. IMO the trend to smaller grip sizes makes hitting one-handers more difficult for those who go that route. I think a larger grip within the range of what one can use is beneficial for a better one-hander, just my opinion.
 

JackB1

G.O.A.T.
The reason why I asked this question is that my bh is my weakest shot and getting that better would improve my overall game...

as long as it's not at the expense of your serve, forehand and the rest of your game.

But I don't really see how a different racquet will drastically improve a weak backhand? Maybe you can mess with strings/tension to give more power, if that's what you need. But ask yourself is this really just an "excuse" to get a new racquet? Been there, done that :)

also, totally agree with what JRStriker just said.....
 

JRstriker12

Hall of Fame
My opinion is that grip size is an important consideration in a one-hander as opposed to a two hander. IMO the trend to smaller grip sizes makes hitting one-handers more difficult for those who go that route. I think a larger grip within the range of what one can use is beneficial for a better one-hander, just my opinion.

I have to agree. I use a 4 5/8 grip.
 

palmerop

Rookie
as long as it's not at the expense of your serve, forehand and the rest of your game.

But I don't really see how a different racquet will drastically improve a weak backhand? Maybe you can mess with strings/tension to give more power, if that's what you need. But ask yourself is this really just an "excuse" to get a new racquet? Been there, done that :)

also, totally agree with what JRStriker just said.....

eh eh yep that element is there...
 

Vlad_C

Semi-Pro
And while we're talking about grips, let's not forget grip shape.
I for one cannot hit 1HBHs with the retail Head grip shape.
Wilson and Prince work much better.
 

drak

Hall of Fame
I have to agree. I use a 4 5/8 grip.

yeah, I have been using a 4 5/16 - 4 3/8 grip for the past several years but always felt my one hander was inconsistent. The past few weeks have built the grip to almost 4 1/2 and both my backhand and volleys are improved, hardest adjustment is the FH.

Drak
 

JRstriker12

Hall of Fame
yeah, I have been using a 4 5/16 - 4 3/8 grip for the past several years but always felt my one hander was inconsistent. The past few weeks have built the grip to almost 4 1/2 and both my backhand and volleys are improved, hardest adjustment is the FH.

Drak

I've just always used a big grip. Not really a factor on the forehand for me.
 

MikeHitsHard93

Hall of Fame
And while we're talking about grips, let's not forget grip shape.
I for one cannot hit 1HBHs with the retail Head grip shape.
Wilson and Prince work much better.

I'm the exact opposite. When I used a 1hbh, I really never hit it better than with a prestige mp and a volkl x10 mid. Super fun and no one uses one hand around here...
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Since I been using 1hbh since 1989, any Babolat, Wilson, Head, Dunlop, Technfiber, Kneissl, I use 1hbh on the backhand side.
None better than any other, I have terrible days, and sometimes I have good days hitting 1hbh, racket makes NO difference.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
I haven't been able to hit a 2hbh since 1979. No matter how often I practice, and with whatever racket.
 
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