One Handed Backhand vs Two Handed Backhand

One Handed or Two Handed

  • One Handed

    Votes: 25 55.6%
  • Two Handed

    Votes: 20 44.4%

  • Total voters
    45

Jake Speeed

Rookie
Because the forehand offers more power and versatility. This in no way conceded it is a weak shot, but fh's are more of a weapon.

The jump bh btw is a technical marvel. Kudos to you if you can hit one handers above shoulder height. That deserves respect.
Well, thank you. See my photo.

Years ago, and I mean years ago, I can remember back the difficulty I was having with this guy's, there's always a guy, ROS. It was bouncing as high as my head.

I learned to get in the air and hit a SHB return during the match. I had no choice.

Can ANYONE do this? I believe most can and do, but as I Posted some place else, you have to be hungry to learn and have a solid game plan while training. The time spent training is so important and very few realize this?

They would rather play sets.

I'm trying to "assist" people who ask for help here, but it seems they don't listen? I'm so used to this. So be it because it doesn't change my ability, where I've been with tennis experience or how I look on the court.

I've witnessed and seen the lack of improvement with many players my whole life.

Only a few "look like tennis players." All the others "just play tennis."

Pick one.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
The idea that a 1HBH is better for ROS because you can hit a jumping one hander is one of the dumber things I’ve read on this forum.

If you’re having to hit head high backhands on the regular, you need to improve your positioning.
 
Years ago, and I mean years ago, I can remember back the difficulty I was having with this guy's, there's always a guy, ROS. It was bouncing as high as my head.

I learned to get in the air and hit a SHB return during the match. I had no choice.
Wouldn't it make more sense to take a couple of steps back or step into the court and hit on the rise? Hitting returns mid-air doesn't strike me as sound advise.
 

Demented

Semi-Pro
I can hit out breaking ball off my cross court 1hbh that is much harder to reach as compared to my inside out forehand. My backhand may be doing slight less 55mph vs 60 mph on the forehand but it's nasty because it's going to push you deep into the alley. I trained the crap out of my inside out forehand prior to developing the 1hbh and by the end of the first month my backhand surpassed it in that situation.
 

Arak

Semi-Pro
Heavily right hand dominant players will almost always hit crap 2h backhands. I spent 3 years hitting weak 2 handers. The first time I got serious and tried to rip a cross court 1hb it was like magic.
Good point. I’m very clumsy with my left hand, and that explains why I could never learn the two hander properly and always felt more natural with the one hander.
 

3loudboys

Hall of Fame
Well, thank you. See my photo.

Years ago, and I mean years ago, I can remember back the difficulty I was having with this guy's, there's always a guy, ROS. It was bouncing as high as my head.

I learned to get in the air and hit a SHB return during the match. I had no choice.

Can ANYONE do this? I believe most can and do, but as I Posted some place else, you have to be hungry to learn and have a solid game plan while training. The time spent training is so important and very few realize this?

They would rather play sets.

I'm trying to "assist" people who ask for help here, but it seems they don't listen? I'm so used to this. So be it because it doesn't change my ability, where I've been with tennis experience or how I look on the court.

I've witnessed and seen the lack of improvement with many players my whole life.

Only a few "look like tennis players." All the others "just play tennis."

Pick one.
For me court positioning is key if you are to play the percentages and max your chances of winning points. The high BH or jump BH is an amazing shot that requires great skill, one or two handed. A good player reduces the need to hit high skill shots by being in the right place at the right time to hit a regular groundstroke which is much safer and offers more options.

It's also my experience that players blame technique for missing balls when actually the majority of times its footwork or lack of, poor court positioning or tactical naivety. Because they miss a shot that's low percentage or that poor footwork didnt give them a chance they look at grips, stroke mechanics, shall I hit one handed or two handed....the list goes on.

Obviously there are strengths and weaknesses of each shot and it comes down to what you are comfortable with and what works in matches when it counts.
 

Gael4

Rookie
Heavily right hand dominant players will almost always hit crap 2h backhands. I spent 3 years hitting weak 2 handers. The first time I got serious and tried to rip a cross court 1hb it was like magic.
Meh, I'm heavily right hand dominant, I can't do anything with my left hand, and sure I struggled to get a 2h backhand but now it may be my best shot. That being said I agree that learning the 1h bh is much more natural/easier. I studied it online for a few days and on my next lesson I was cracking great powerful 1hbhs, the teacher was a bit shocked. However the next week it was all gone, so I stopped trying to change something that works and gave up...
 

Jake Speeed

Rookie
Wouldn't it make more sense to take a couple of steps back or step into the court and hit on the rise? Hitting returns mid-air doesn't strike me as sound advise.
If your playing "club level" tennis that could work? But if your playing 5.5 or 6 as I did most of my life, just getting to the ball sideways can be a task. ROS, the first one is "generally" blocked. Second serve is a bit different. You have more time to return it, but if hit correctly it'll be tricky because the ball will curve in flight towards you plus respond when it hits the court.

The idea that a 1HBH is better for ROS because you can hit a jumping one hander is one of the dumber things I’ve read on this forum. If you’re having to hit head high backhands on the regular, you need to improve your positioning.
"Cashman,"

You might want to reread that a few times. I was referring only to a technique I was forced to develop during match play, not for all around court play. There's nothing to gain by misinterpreting something someone says. BTW, questions are great, but it seems most just make statements?

Yea, I say stupid things but what I say is true. :cool: So, be rude, or learn. Pick one. I don't care.
 
Last edited:

HitMoreBHs

Rookie
I learned the game when there were only two prominent male pros using the double-hander. As such, I use a single-hander and have no issues with taking the ball early, hitting over it at shoulder height, generating moon balls with heavy top and going for finishing shots from directional patterns.

That said, I taught my two sons that there is no place for the double-hander in the modern game. With the rise of heavy topspin, the number of shoulder height balls played during the course of a match these days means that a double-hander has the stability and consistency advantage for most players. Not as pretty, but easier to learn and master.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
Each stroke has its pros and cons. However the beauty aspect is subjective. Mecir, Agassi, Nalbandian had beautiful 2hbh strokes. Henin’s 1hbh, while a great stroke that made her a legend, was not an aesthetically pleasing one, IMO.
 

Jake Speeed

Rookie
I learned the game when there were only two prominent male pros using the double-hander. As such, I use a single-hander and have no issues with taking the ball early, hitting over it at shoulder height, generating moon balls with heavy top and going for finishing shots from directional patterns.

That said, I taught my two sons that there is no place for the double-hander in the modern game. With the rise of heavy topspin, the number of shoulder height balls played during the course of a match these days means that a double-hander has the stability and consistency advantage for most players. Not as pretty, but easier to learn and master.
When did you "learn the game?"

You can take the ball at any height you choose. Early, top of the bounce or late. Plus anywhere in between. Newbies/beginners to tennis I generally have them take the ball late for many reasons. As they progress with ability, they can take it as early as they like.

I've seen players develop poor stroking habits because of their attempt at taking a ball early.
 

Jake Speeed

Rookie
Started in 1979, on grass, when wood was all you got! JC and BB were huge and the DHB was still in its infancy.
Those were great times for just about everything. I miss those times and the people. People have really changed.

I'll be suiting up shortly and will go to the local courts, 8 of them, and I'll have to deal with people. There were more courts but two are now Pickle Ball.

I let no one know I instructed if I can help it. It never pays off.

Kinda like a Forum. :)
 
Last edited:
I m a one hander. Would up vote 2hbh

if I get caught at my feet or court late I will often do a desperate two hand block shot so it must be more natural
That's interesting: I hit a 2HBH drive but when I get desperate, I hit a 1HBH. I definitely have more touch which explains why my slice approach and net game are better than my ground game.
 

Demented

Semi-Pro
I keep my off hand on the throat to preload tension. If I get jammed with a ball I'm not prepared for I simply block it high with my left hand. It helps obviously that my old 2 handed backhand used a semi western grip so grabbing the throat has the same face orientation that I'm used to.
 
If your playing "club level" tennis that could work? But if your playing 5.5 or 6 as I did most of my life, just getting to the ball sideways can be a task. ROS, the first one is "generally" blocked. Second serve is a bit different. You have more time to return it, but if hit correctly it'll be tricky because the ball will curve in flight towards you plus respond when it hits the court.
Sorry, but this doesn't make sense to me. I used to train with guys in the Future circuit and highly ranked juniors in my country, and I never saw the jumping ROS as a go-to move. You don't see it in the Pros either. So I don't understand how 5.5 level of play, whatever that means, would require something that higher levels do not.
 

Jake Speeed

Rookie
Sorry, but this doesn't make sense to me. I used to train with guys in the Future circuit and highly ranked juniors in my country, and I never saw the jumping ROS as a go-to move. You don't see it in the Pros either. So I don't understand how 5.5 level of play, whatever that means, would require something that higher levels do not.
Read what I wrote again. I was referring to one match.

I also stand by what I say. A kicker, if hit properly, will bounce high and give shorter players difficulty.

"Easy to talk, hard to do."
 
Read what I wrote again. I was referring to one match.

I also stand by what I say. A kicker, if hit properly, will bounce high and give shorter players difficulty.

"Easy to talk, hard to do."
I guess we'll have to agree to disagree here.

I'm as short as they come, and high kickers do give me trouble. I just wouldn't choose to solve that issue by hitting jumping backhands. I'd rather re-assess my positioning strategy. In my opinion, a high level player as you describe would probably be better off going for a high percentage shot hitting on the rise or hitting a deep, heavy ball a couple of extra steps behind the baseline.

And yes, everything in life is easier said than done, but that also includes hitting jumping backhands.
 

zaph

Professional
The two hander vs one hander is one of those non-sense debates, which is full of myths and prejudices. Were people who play either shot are determined to defend their choice. So you get non-sense like two hander have no reach and power, from one handed advocates. Whereas the two handed players hit back by saying one handers are unsteady and erratic.

The reality is I have seen excellent examples of both shot in amateur tennis and terrible versions of both shots. The only prejudices that, in my opinion, holds any truth is about the high ball. It is easier to deal with a high ball with a two handed shot. I am relatively short and not very strong and it is noticeable that the high backhand doesn't cause me the same problems as most one handed players.
 

Jake Speeed

Rookie
I guess we'll have to agree to disagree here.

I'm as short as they come, and high kickers do give me trouble. I just wouldn't choose to solve that issue by hitting jumping backhands. I'd rather re-assess my positioning strategy. In my opinion, a high level player as you describe would probably be better off going for a high percentage shot hitting on the rise or hitting a deep, heavy ball a couple of extra steps behind the baseline.

And yes, everything in life is easier said than done, but that also includes hitting jumping backhands.
Move further back and you have to travel sideways more. Unless you have legs like ATP?
Sad thing is, EVERYTHING which is talked about, as far as court performance and hitting,

Requires ability. Gee. :)
 

Jake Speeed

Rookie
The two hander vs one hander is one of those non-sense debates, which is full of myths and prejudices. Were people who play either shot are determined to defend their choice. So you get non-sense like two hander have no reach and power, from one handed advocates. Whereas the two handed players hit back by saying one handers are unsteady and erratic.

The reality is I have seen excellent examples of both shot in amateur tennis and terrible versions of both shots. The only prejudices that, in my opinion, holds any truth is about the high ball. It is easier to deal with a high ball with a two handed shot. I am relatively short and not very strong and it is noticeable that the high backhand doesn't cause me the same problems as most one handed players.
Politely, I'll disagree. I hit both, 2HB and SHB, remember I said this?

A ball hit to my BHS that bounces higher than my head, I can hit it back, with topspin, without difficulty. Sure, grip change and hit well out in front of you. I cannot hit the same height ball with 2 hands on the racket.
 
Move further back and you have to travel sideways more. Unless you have legs like ATP?
Sad thing is, EVERYTHING which is talked about, as far as court performance and hitting,

Requires ability. Gee. :)
Yes, that is true. However, you are casually neglecting to address the other alternative I mentioned which is stepping in and hitting on the rise. Also, my understanding is that level 5.5 - 6.0 should mean you have legs pretty close to ATP. I may be wrong since I don't live in the US, so I'm not that well versed in NTRP.

Sports in general require a degree of ability, so not quite sure what your point is there.
 

Jake Speeed

Rookie
Yes, that is true. However, you are casually neglecting to address the other alternative I mentioned which is stepping in and hitting on the rise. Also, my understanding is that level 5.5 - 6.0 should mean you have legs pretty close to ATP. I may be wrong since I don't live in the US, so I'm not that well versed in NTRP.

Sports in general require a degree of ability, so not quite sure what your point is there.

My point is simple. a SHB will out perform a 2HB in many ways. 5.5 and 6.0, ATP is like 7+.Really a big difference.

What about "reaction time?"

The "degree of ability" isn't the same for all rec. or Club players. Some players will always be better than others.

I no longer have the game I had when I was in my prime. I don't even have the wind! :cry:
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Foods most often linked to intestinal gas include:

  • Beans and lentils
  • Asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and other vegetables
  • Fructose, a natural sugar found in artichokes, onions, pears, wheat, and some soft drinks
  • Lactose, the natural sugar found in milk
  • Fruits, oat bran, peas, and other foods high in soluble fiber, which gets digested in your large intestine
  • Corn, pasta, potatoes, and other foods rich in starch
  • Sorbitol, the artificial sweetener
  • Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, and whole wheat
 
I sometimes do that. I still have 2 handed reflexes from when I switched 2 years ago.
+ you are not going
Which do you prefer with modern-day racquets and strings? I prefer my one-handed backhand because I have more power and spin.
One big advantage you are not going to get a left wrist injury (aka Kim Clisters) that needs surgery if you are a righty with a one hander.
 
Top