Opponent stands way back @ the fence to return serves.

Pete Player

Hall of Fame
How do you adjust?
Or do you just keep blasting your same old 1st serve?
Defenatly not. Some pace off and bigger angles for sure. That also will have an impact, if he just shows being in the back and actually steps in onto the baseline while you serve.

Two reasons actually. I cannot keep up serving big for the whole of a match and variance will make and keep the opp second guessing.




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On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 
How do you adjust?
Or do you just keep blasting your same old 1st serve?
First of all, why do you feel you have to adjust? Is it because he's returning your serve easily?

I definitely agree with @Pete Player. Another thing to try is hitting serves short. And since you only care about winning [for now], try the dreaded UH serve.

The only thing likely NOT to work is hitting harder.
 
If not underhanded, how does one hit a serve short?
You reduce RHS and swing slower?
For a short serve, do you serve a topKick or a flat?

When I try to serve short, I default to a slower RHS 2nd serve.
But, that topspin helps the opponent.
There has to be a better way.

I would 100% serve underhanded, (and I think the pros are STUPID not to)
but, for club rec tennis, I don't want to hear ******** from brats.
 
If not underhanded, how does one hit a serve short?
You reduce RHS and swing slower?
For a short serve, do you serve a topKick or a flat?

When I try to serve short, I default to a slower RHS 2nd serve.
But, that topspin helps the opponent.
There has to be a better way.
Multiple ways. 2 that come to mind:
- Dink [waiter tray, flat]
- Use more topspin and adjust the trajectory of the ball so there is a sharper arc. RHS should be the same as any other serve

I'm not very good at serving short because I never practice it.

I would 100% serve underhanded, (and I think the pros are STUPID not to)
but, for club rec tennis, I don't want to hear ******** from brats.
The brats' opinions are irrelevant if you only care about winning and beautiful strokes mean nothing.
 

mcs1970

Hall of Fame
This is a hypothetical.
Yes, let's assume he's returning your serves easily.
If an opponent is standing way back near the fence the server is in the top 1% of the tennis playing population. Such a server will have enough control of his serve to know how to mix in different types of serves. Also if the ball is approaching the fence on one bounce unless you are a top pro you are not handling that speed easily.

At our levels instead of pondering over hypotheticals like these it is better to parctice control of our serves. A lot of rec players can't place the serve where they want unless they take a lot off.
 

Pete Player

Hall of Fame
Last game I played, I started serving close to totally flat body serves. When he adjusted, I put in some side spin and got him both moving and being faulty positioned.

Maximum of two similar serves in a row. When he started coming in more, I added some pace, but kept hitting the corners, which I did with the slices before that.

So, he never got into, what was coming next and shanked most of his returns out.


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On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 
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Multiple ways. 2 that come to mind:
- Dink [waiter tray, flat]
- Use more topspin and adjust the trajectory of the ball so there is a sharper arc. RHS should be the same as any other serve
.
Waiter's tray (female serve)
is the most obvious answer to my question, yet I totally overlooked it.

Topspin is the antithesis of this scenario, since it helps the ball kick higher and reach the deep opponent.
This needs the exact opposite of topspin.
 
Waiter's tray (female serve)
is the most obvious answer to my question, yet I totally overlooked it.

Topspin is the antithesis of this scenario, since it helps the ball kick higher and reach the deep opponent.
This needs the exact opposite of topspin.
TS also allows you to sharpen the arc and make the ball land shorter so it's a matter of how the two net [no pun intended] out.
 
You know, you're right.

Who can complain about an underhanded serve?
It's like a gift (but it's anything but. Even pros can't handle underhanded serves)

You're going to complain that I am beating you with an underhanded serve?
That's like telling the cops your pot has been stolen.

I will try both.
Underhanded and waiter's dink.
I will report the results after the match
 
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OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
With you being a lefty, why not develop that devastating lefty slice serve? Often hits more shallow in the box and many of us righties really hate it! Would be a great changeup especially if they are getting used to your kick serve.
 
I started the match serving very weakly, including warm ups. This had the guy in shallow.

As soon as I served one big serve he backed up to the tarp, just as I was told he does.

SO, For the rest of the match I had to cycle between top dink second serving when he was back and then back to flat First serves once he was back at the Baseline
 
This is the serve you are talking about right?

I've tried that wicked slice serve but I can't do it. I pretty much get no sideways motion at all... Plus it basically goes right into the net.... I need to take some serious coaching to learn that serve.... For now I'm going to focus on other aspects of the game

People talk like it's just some easy obvious thing... Like like oh you're righty? you just do a flat 140 miles an hour serve.... easy-peasy
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
This is the serve you are talking about right?

Sorry, what was the video about? I was too distracted by the Hungarian.

But seriously, for a Lefty, a hard slice is a requirement. It is so contrary to the motion most players are used to. My son can't do it and he's a Lefty. So he leaves a lot on the table. If he misses his first serve that comes in mid-90s with movement, he hits a nice kicker... which I crush back. Just need to stand back, be patient and wait till it comes down.

Most people miss-hit kickers because they are impatient and tries to hit it like a topspin or slice-top.

A kicker can work well for a Lefty IF they can hit a good slice and a good topspin. You will keep your opponent totally off balance.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
How do you adjust?
Or do you just keep blasting your same old 1st serve?
I don't adjust. If I'm hitting great to cause him to adjust his stance, then I keep serving the same.

If his adjustment causes him to return rockets back all the time, then I'll start hitting off speed spin serves.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
I dream of driving someone to the back fence with my serve. Even the strongest servers at our club can’t keep someone that far back.

Anyway the answer to someone standing way back is a midpower slice serve. Since he’s given you so much space, he will have to really move to get a racket on the ball.
 

zaph

Semi-Pro
How do you adjust?
Or do you just keep blasting your same old 1st serve?
Let me guess, you want to sell the drop serve again?

The problem with serving short is you best hope that your opponent can't read you serve, because if they get upto it you are in trouble.

It is easy to counter, someone tried it against me on Friday, I tend to stand back. I simply waited till he was about to hit it and walked up the court. Since I was moving onto his short ball, hitting it passed him was easy. It threw his service technique off, because he didn't know when I was going to sneak in. He started hitting it long, because he couldn't easily adjust the pace on his serve under pressure.
 
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zaph

Semi-Pro
I dream of driving someone to the back fence with my serve. Even the strongest servers at our club can’t keep someone that far back.

Anyway the answer to someone standing way back is a midpower slice serve. Since he’s given you so much space, he will have to really move to get a racket on the ball.
We have someone who hits in the mid 120's, when he hits the lines it doesn't matter where you stand, it is passed you before you can do anything.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
We have someone who hits in the mid 120's, when he hits the lines it doesn't matter where you stand, it is passed you before you can do anything.
That’s why you don’t stand back even against the best servers. If they hit the lines you are done anyway. Stand close enough that you can block something back within your reach and not take it right in the chest. I tend to be about 6 feet back for the 100 mph guys. Any further back and they can ace me too easily. Any closer and I can’t get the racket out to meet the ball in time.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
How do you adjust?
Or do you just keep blasting your same old 1st serve?
this is the same problem I have sometimes. when my opponent find out that they can't handle my serve standing just behind the baseline, they move way way back. and that actually works for them
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
Slow, spinny slice serve out wide on deuce court (your ad court as a lefty). Will likely ace him, he won't be able to get to it in less than 2 bounces.

Keep slicing until he stands closer to cut off the angle, then you can go back to your faster serves.
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
Another option is S&V down the T. With him standing so far back, you can probably hit your 1st volley in front of the service line. Standing far back, with a topspin serve down the T, he won't have any good angles to pass you with, and you'll be in good net position.
 

Morch Us

Semi-Pro
I am really surpriced that you being a lefty still never mastered the slice serve. I have never seen a lefty without a slice serve. Obviously it works very well against someone staying too far since the angles are pretty open. But being a lefty, you get to enjoy tons of mishits from opponents, even when they are not opening up angles, since it will take time for them to adjust to the side spin from a lefty.

When I try to serve short, I default to a slower RHS 2nd serve.But, that topspin helps the opponent.There has to be a better way.
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
The only way I was able to get control of my serves was to hit over a 100 serves/day. I feel pretty good at around 150/session. I've been doing that regime close to 3 yrs. I am 63. I mentally divide the service box into 6 segments. I find that variety finds me more points these days. I love bamboozling an opponent even if I can't blow them off the court. And a lot of times when I hit what I consider my "heater" it often comes back faster than I served it. So to avoid too many of those I try and "walk" my serve around the box, short/deep/slice/TS/kick. So as to be realistic if my "down the T" is within 12" of the centerline I feel OK. Unless the opponent has really good movement going into the body for those who like to stand on the baseline works to get easy or errant returns. If they stand way back just serving short out wide brings them in to where you can go into the body or up the T. That short high kicker not moving particularly fast gets a lot of rec players. The last time I hit an underhand serve was this past winter and one of my opponents said, "That is not fair." I laughed so hard I was crying. These guys were 20 yrs younger than me.
 

samarai

Semi-Pro
we have been trying to say this since the beginning. For a lefty at his level, all he needs is a good slice and he can almost win most of his serve points. people at that level have weak backhands and the lefty slice will wreck havoc.
Instead he continues to throw up hypotheticals as if he is playing nadal or federer. tha's what his coach should have instilled, play to your strengths. dont need to reinvent the wheel. Instead, he's trying to model his game to play against ATP top 20 players.
 

rogerroger917

Hall of Fame
I bet that exacly was you thought about topspin serve too, before learning the feel of topspin serve. I will wait for the day you come back here and post how easy and consistent your slice serve is.
Yeah. Once a player gets better they can hit all the serves. Just practice. Playing matches also helps. But some players are afraid to play matches. So they never learn the full skill set under pressure.
 

Bender

G.O.A.T.
It's quite obviously the slower slice serve out wide, ideally placed in the corner or halfway up the service box.
 

AdrianC

New User
I just keep going, not wanting to mess with my rhythm and timing. The way i figure it is they'll likely struggle to reach anything either side of center in the service box.
 
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