Osaka News

NuBas

Legend
She is from another planet. Now I see how she could serve out the match yesterday under those circumstances.
Even during Novak's press conference he said its very tough to focus when stadium is closed, noise is unbearable. She is just from another culture, that and its just her nature. I think her being introverted helps staying mentally within herself and worrying about what she can control. I think the word is tunnel-vision.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
Even during Novak's press conference he said its very tough to focus when stadium is closed, noise is unbearable. She is just from another culture, that and its just her nature. I think her being introverted helps staying mentally within herself and worrying about what she can control. I think the word is tunnel-vision.
she has a sports psychologist that helps her all the time. she is very shy and that actually hurts her more than helping her
 

oldmanfan

Legend
Hey I just found out her own Haitian father is fluent in Japanese, so he is trilingual. Please watch entire video! That's so cool her father speaks Japanese.

Thx for the clip!

Naomi went from "I would be happy if I got chosen to play (the Olympics)" -----> USO18 Champ!!
Who would DARE to not let her play now? :p
 
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Tennease

Legend
Sorry. What is a pinpoint service motion?
http://www.improve-your-tennis.com/tennis-serve-stance.html&ved=2ahUKEwjQlpnUuq_dAhWb-2EKHTW4C6gQFjAKegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw0JfI3ZV2isVWcpfBWSn15g


Pinpoint Stance


The pinpoint serve stance is where your feet are at most only a couple of inches away from each other. Some tennis players even go into this stance with both of their feet basically touching. Tennis players like Gael Monfils as well as Andy Roddick commonly use this type of tennis serve stance. It must be noted that there are possible variations to the pinpoint stance. For instance, the hybrid pinpoint stance demands that players begin in a platform stance with feet apart a little bit wider. On the motion to the trophy position, they then slide their back foot up beside their front foot and into the pinpoint stance. Examples of the many players that use the hybrid pinpoint stance are Tomas Berdych and Andy Murray.






Advantages


The advantage of the pinpoint stance is definitely explosive speed and power. With this stance, tennis players will be able to more easily explode up and into the tennis ball during their tennis serve. This has to do with the fact that their feet are closer together for this stance. As you hit the tennis ball, you will come up just a little bit higher, which will allow you to obtain a little bit greater power, too.

Disadvantages


The disadvantage with a pinpoint stance such as the hybrid pinpoint stance is that more of the body is in motion. Thus, it is far more troublesome to perfectly time the serve, and it is also less easy to be in full control of the ball toss and your balance throughout this movement. There is also a risk of foot faulting when you bring your back foot to the front.
 

NuBas

Legend
That is interesting. It seems Dad speaks better Japanese than his daughter. I think he really loves Japan and her people

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports...i-osakas-triumph-u-s-open-final/#.W5Xj89hfii5
Yeah, his story might be more interesting than hers, I'm sure we will learn more about their family when she gains more success or in the following year. Thanks for that great article and nice to see you have an avatar now haha. I'm gonna post article you found here in a picture for easy reading.



 

70後

Hall of Fame
Yeah, his story might be more interesting than hers

Did you post this already?

Forgot where I found this looking through all the Osaka news today,

maybe somebody else already posted it, forgot who.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/23/magazine/naomi-osakas-breakthrough-game.html

several really interesting things in it including about Leonard and Tamaki.

The most interesting, significant thing for me is this :

"Osaka and Bajin were halfway through their first three-minute drill, a baseline rally that lasts about 10 times longer than an average exchange in a match. The drill is meant to make the legs and lungs burn without affecting the pace and placement of the athlete’s groundstrokes. It also happens to goad Osaka’s competitive pride. After about 80 shots, by my count, neither she nor Bajin had missed. "
 
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NuBas

Legend
Did you post this already?

Forgot where I found this looking through all the Osaka news today,

maybe somebody else already posted it, forgot who.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/23/magazine/naomi-osakas-breakthrough-game.html

several really interesting things in it including about Leonard and Tamaki.

The most interesting, significant thing for me is this :

"Osaka and Bajin were halfway through their first three-minute drill, a baseline rally that lasts about 10 times longer than an average exchange in a match. The drill is meant to make the legs and lungs burn without affecting the pace and placement of the athlete’s groundstrokes. It also happens to goad Osaka’s competitive pride. After about 80 shots, by my count, neither she nor Bajin had missed. "
Yeah, I read the article and posted it but chose to remove. It was good read, I just did not like some parts.
 

Stretchy Man

Professional
Come on man there lots of wholesome people and I think her attitude and personality stems a lot from the Japanese culture. These people are extremely polite, still, and have great perseverance.
I don't mean to burst your fantasy of Japan, but Osaka's mother didn't talk to her family for 10 years because they would not accept she married a black man.
 

Bluefan75

Professional
You know, I can't stand when athletes say "grateful for the opportunity to play on that stage." She earned every bit of that "opportunity." It just reinforces the "there are powers above you that will decide whether you can participate or not." The privilege is in being blessed with the ability, not the fact you are able to show it off.
 

70後

Hall of Fame
I think the Japanese accept Naomi. Her Japanese manners and humility rings true with them.



I hope this is worth posting. Kimiko's thoughts on Osaka.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports...a-japans-first-world-number-one/#.W5aG6Nhfii4

Kimiko on Osaka :

“To play like that in her first Grand Slam final was just amazing,” Date told AFP.

“To keep your cool like that, from the moment you step onto court to the last point, isn’t easy,”

“If she continues to develop the way she has over the past two weeks and stays motivated, she can go on to be Japan’s first world No. 1.”

Date gave a withering assessment of the crowd’s reaction after Osaka was clearly unable to savor her achievement.

“For the atmosphere to turn like that after Osaka’s first (major) final was a pity,” she said. “To think how she must have felt not to be able to properly enjoy her victory and to see her crying made my heart ache.”
 
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NuBas

Legend
I don't mean to burst your fantasy of Japan, but Osaka's mother didn't talk to her family for 10 years because they would not accept she married a black man.
Different times man. Plus look what fortunes it turned out to be for her grand parents. They are now basking in riches. Plus we can't be entirely sure everything written in that article is entirely true.
 

NuBas

Legend
Her Indian Wells title was so impressive. Take a look at opponents she defeated:

Round 1 - M. Sharapova -----6-4 6-4
Round 2 - A. Radwanska --- 6-3 6-2
Round 3 - S. Vickery ---------6-3 6-3
Round 4 - M. Sakkari -------6-1 5-7 6-1
Quarter - K. Pliskova -------6-2 6-3
Semi - S. Halep ---------------6-3 6-0
Final - D. Kasatkina ----------6-3 6-2
 

oldmanfan

Legend
Her Indian Wells title was so impressive. Take a look at opponents she defeated:

Round 1 - M. Sharapova -----6-4 6-4
Round 2 - A. Radwanska --- 6-3 6-2
Round 3 - S. Vickery ---------6-3 6-3
Round 4 - M. Sakkari -------6-1 5-7 6-1
Quarter - K. Pliskova -------6-2 6-3
Semi - S. Halep ---------------6-3 6-0
Final - D. Kasatkina ----------6-3 6-2
Yup, it's arguably her better win (i.e. tougher path tournament) defeating not 1, but 3(!) current or former #1s (4 current/former top-tens).

Also USO18 Champ:
 

philosoup

Rookie
I don't mean to burst your fantasy of Japan, but Osaka's mother didn't talk to her family for 10 years because they would not accept she married a black man.
Any more stories about this? Unfortunately, as I heard, this is not too uncommon for people of older generations even against their children's marriage with someone coming from a different social and family background or simply from a different village.
 

NuBas

Legend
Any more stories about this? Unfortunately, as I heard, this is not too uncommon for people of older generations even against their children's marriage with someone coming from a different social and family background or simply from a different village.
Its from an article from post #72 on this page. Its not a big deal, just read the entire article. It was a different time where her father was one of only two Haitians in entire Hokkaido.
 

NuBas

Legend
So her head coach is Aleksandar Sascha Bajin, conditioning coach Abdul Sillah, agent Stuart, and the Japanese women's instagram is natsuko__72.

I have seen her stretching Naomi and if you visit Naomi's instagram, she often hangs out with her. I agree with you she is a good female role model and voice within the male dominant team.
 

AlexanderTheGreat08

Hall of Fame
Her Indian Wells title was so impressive. Take a look at opponents she defeated:

Round 1 - M. Sharapova -----6-4 6-4
Round 2 - A. Radwanska --- 6-3 6-2
Round 3 - S. Vickery ---------6-3 6-3
Round 4 - M. Sakkari -------6-1 5-7 6-1
Quarter - K. Pliskova -------6-2 6-3
Semi - S. Halep ---------------6-3 6-0
Final - D. Kasatkina ----------6-3 6-2
6-3 6-0 to the World No.1
 

Plamen1234

Hall of Fame
As the sky darkened and lights glowed on Saturday evening, fans watched a complex drama unfold on the courts of Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens, New York. Embedded in the showdown between Grand Slam finalists Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka and the umpire presiding over them, Carlos Ramos, were glaring clashes of race and gender, power and privilege.

By now, you’ve probably heard that Williams’ attempt at a record-tying 24th Grand Slam singles title fell short amid a broiling dispute between her and Ramos over three code violations. And while the dispute raises important conversations about race and gender, Osaka has been unfairly eclipsed by the fallout.

So, for a moment, let’s put aside the Serena debate and dive under the skin of this new champion, who even felt like she had to apologize for her victory. The charming, goofy 20-year-old provides plenty to unpack. Often pictured flashing peace signs in her Instagram photos and clad in stylish outfits (which she has no shame repeating, a promising sign for us ordinary folks), her feed is filled with an abundance of emojis, a lot of “thank you” captions and more than a few selfies

Osaka doesn’t show a penchant for too much polish; she uses Harry Potter references on Twitter and gives her followers candid updates when she’s feeling pressured (both in English and Japanese). When discussing emotional ups and downs, she told GQ that it takes her a while to absorb things. Put simply, she’s refreshing.

But Osaka’s background is far from simple. She was born in Osaka, Japan, to a Japanese mother, Tamaki Osaka, and a Haitian-American father, Leonard François. Athleticism runs in the family. She was trained by her father, and her older sister, Mari, is also a professional tennis player. The two have played side by side in doubles.

Osaka’s family moved to the U.S. when she was 3. She identifies as a Black woman of Japanese and Haitian descent, with dual citizenship in Japan and the U.S. Though Osaka isn’t fluent, this doesn’t stop her from trying to answer interview questions in less-than-perfect Japanese when speaking to Japanese outlets, according to The New York Times. Being biracial — or hafu in Japanese, from the English word “half” — is far from easy in a nation like Japan, which values racial purity and homogeneity.

And these cultural expectations run deep in her family. When Osaka’s Japanese grandfather learned that his daughter was involved with a Black man, he became furious. Osaka’s mother was not in contact with her family for more than a decade as a result. Navigating this complexity is not lost on Osaka, who told USA Today in 2016: “When I go to Japan, people are confused. From my name, they don’t expect to see a Black girl.”

Although she trains at Evert Tennis Academy in Boca Raton, Florida, Osaka plays under the Japanese flag. In interviews, she’s made it clear that she’s proud to represent both the Japanese and Haitian sides of her family. Now as Japan’s first winner of a Grand Slam, she’s being celebrated by a nation that didn’t fully accept her before.

Despite the weight of Osaka’s identity, she never takes herself too seriously. After practice, you can find her playing hours of video games with Mari, as reported by GQ, not to mention her whimsical social media feeds. But contrary to her free and endearing nature on camera, she’s stoic on the court. “Just genetically my face is like this,” she said, according to News.com.au, laughing. “I’m sorry.” That’s not to say her mind is still. “In my brain, I’m going, ‘Oh, my God, why?’ about like 90 percent of the time,” she joked.

When she steps onto the court, Osaka is an aggressive force to be reckoned with. She’s one of the few female tennis players whose forehand tops 100 miles per hour, according to The New York Times, and this powerful stroke has been essential to her success. In last weekend’s final Grand Slam match, her strokes never relented, and she hit winners on the run. She’s known for a wicked first serve and is likely to become even more formidable as she develops a net game.

Saturday was a watershed moment. Osaka once said she had done a report in third grade about her childhood idol Williams, complete with coloring. Now they were sharing the sport’s biggest stage. In the first set, Osaka outplayed Williams by a significant margin. Early in the second set, Ramos issued the code violation for coaching, which was the catalyst for the acts that followed. Osaka stayed focused amid the disputes as the match unfolded, and it was a searing wide serve that Osaka sent over the net at 114 miles per hour — which Williams tipped, but deflected out — that clinched her win, a moment that does not deserve to be overshadowed.

Source:https://www.ozy.com/need-to-know/the-rising-tennis-star-who-shouldnt-be-in-the-shadows/89280
 

pushing_wins

Hall of Fame
Already blowing up in Japan. This image is from their live news. Next tournament for Naomi is Tokyo, they probably have parade lined up.
Its a great win since her Mom is from Hokkaido, the region which recently got rocked by a quake.

nah she is hafu
 

70後

Hall of Fame
http://www.papermag.com/naomi-osaka-commes-des-garcons-2603814994.html

The dress is not just a dress, but a statement of support.

"The support of Kawakubo — at least through the lending of her fashion — is a hard ticket to come by. She's not only been known to decline the invitation to dress most celebrities, but she didn't even do so for more than a handful at the 2016 Costume Institute and Met Gala whose exhibit was completely in honor of her."
 

Tennease

Legend
US Open winner Naomi Osaka reveals her strict diet

SEPTEMBER 12, 20181:35pm

Naomi Osaka of Japan poses with the championship trophy after winning the US Open Women's Singles finals match against Serena Williams. Picture: Julian Finney/Getty Images/AFPSource:AFP

Rebecca Sullivan

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/h...t/news-story/5a514d30b01e73df4f55bda04e65e52a


DESPITE what you might think about Serena Williams’ performance at the US Open final, what isn’t up for dispute is the incredible talent of Naomi Osaka.

The 20-year-old’s first Grand Slam win has already been marred by controversy, but with a blazing forehand that’s faster than Roger Federer’s, Osaka has proved she’s already a star.

You don’t get to Osaka’s level without a life full of sacrifices.

That includes abstaining from the lifestyle adopted by most people her age, so no boozy college parties or instant noodles for dinner.


Naomi Osaka of Japan poses with her championship trophy. Picture: Eduardo Munox Alvarez/AFPSource:AFP

Osaka told Teen Vogue she sticks to a “strict diet” both during a tennis tournament and the off-season.

“It’s going to sound kind of extreme, but during the off-season, I was eating boiled foods. I would boil chicken and broccoli, and no carbs,” she said.

During competition, including the US Open, things get a little less strict.

“I’ve been eating the same breakfast for two weeks now, which is a salmon bagel. I ate that before my match,” Osaka said. “I always have to put my right shoe on first, and all my racquets have to be on a certain side of my bag.”

Osaka loves ice cream but isn’t allowed to indulge too often.

“Only green tea ice cream. I don’t eat it when I’m training, but if I win a tournament, I would want to. But I still haven’t,” she said.

She’s about to fly to Tokyo but won’t be tucking into sushi while she’s home in Japan.

“Lots of good rice dishes. I’m not really allowed to eat carbs leading up to a tournament, so I’m a little sad about that, but, hopefully, I’ll have at least one good meal,” she said.


Osaka repping her Adidas threads during the US Open final. Picture: Julian Finney/Getty Images/AFPSource:AFP

All that hard work is paying off. Osaka is reportedly set to sign one of the richest sponsorship deals in women’s sport, worth an estimated $14 million ($US10 million) per year.

Her current sponsorship deal with Adidas expires at the end of 2018 and the brand is reportedly moving quickly to ensure she stays.

The monster deal would see Osaka rocket up the list of highest-earning female athletes on the planet. It’s reportedly the third richest sponsorship deal in women’s tennis and the most money Adidas has ever handed to a female tennis player.

Her potential new sponsorship deal and US Open champion prize money of $5.3 million ($US3.8m) would see Osaka jump Caroline Wozniacki into second spot on the 2018 Forbes’ list of highest paid female athletes.
 
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