Overlapping strings at holes = bad?

I don't know how to call this area. Let's say three strings (three sections) come together in this area.

In the first photo no overlaps are on all three racquets.

I have seen a string job which has one section overlapping the other section along half the length of the latter.
Is overlapping a sign of a bad string job?

Photo stolen from
https://federerfan07.com/2018/06/09/2018-wilson-pro-staff-rf97-autograph-review/



[Edited] Overlapping.
 
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Vlad_C

Semi-Pro
What exactly do you mean by overlaping?

In the pic you posted, racquets 1 and 3 look perfectly fine to me.
On the middle one, I wouldn't be particularly happy with that string crossing from under to over.
 

esgee48

Legend
Middle frame in your pic has what is called a cross over. Does not affect playability, but looks like crap. Stringer had 2 blocked holes and he/she did not plan for it. If a scrap piece of string is placed in those holes before tension is applied, there would be room for the other string to come out aligned correctly as seen in the 1st and 3rd frames. I would ask why this happened. Misalignments like this should not happen unless it was a newbie doing the work.
 

Vlad_C

Semi-Pro
Photo added. That is my racquet and I am not happy about it. Want to know if the stringer is bad.
It's not something you want to see.
It is possible though that the stringer actually tried to route the last string under the other ones, and the string just slipped when tying the not.
You might even be able to slide it down over the other string just by pushing it down.
Although at the end of the day it will probably make no difference in terms of how the racquet plays.
 

JustTennis76

Professional
I am a home stringer and have done this many times on my rackets. Yea it doesn’t look good but it’s my my own racket and I did it but if some professional stringer is doing that for his customers I would take it back to them and ask for a new string job. The bottom line is it doesn’t affect the playability whatsoever.
 

esgee48

Legend
If the string is going to a tie off, then there's nothing wrong about the string job. 2nd picture is what I am refering to. The stringer could have gone under rather than over the cross to assure that the string stays aligned. But at the end of day, it will have no effect on play and it is OK.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
FWIW the term for this overlapping is a “cross-over.” It’s probably not going to effect playability, but it looks terrible. IMHO no retail shop worth their salt, or an experienced independent stringer who cares, would return a racquet as in the pictures back to the customer. That’s complete laziness or outright amateur hour stuff. Find a new stringer.
 
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Crossovers don't affect playability, but if the player is "shoveler" or "ground scrubber" the crossover string is exposed above the groove and can lead to premature breakage after repeated contact with the ground. All three are good in the first image IMHO. However, in the second image, it looks like the stringer miss the guide for the string that jumps two holes, which as @esgee48 points out is likely for the tie-off.
 

10shoe

Semi-Pro
I would be more concerned about the burned grommet on the middle racquet in the first picture than what barely qualifies to be called a crossover.

On your Hyper Hammer, I would not waste my time and gas taking the racquet back to the stringer. He will make you feel like a jerk by taking his thumbnail to the string loop and pulling it down into place (and handing it back to you less than 3 seconds later).
 

Kevo

Legend
I wouldn't worry about it. Sometimes it's a mistake, and sometimes it's a choice to go under rather than over the other string because you don't have to pry at the string with an awl. I've done it before. Grommets get worn and sometimes the strings don't lay right or the little guides get pinched or flattened and in my mind it's better to put the string through the path of least resistance. I'd rather have one overlap than push on it with a tool because I feel it's safer for the string. However, if you're real picky or have a compulsion about it just show it to them on the next stringing and tell them it bothers you. They'll probably be cool about it and make it neater next time, but my advice is there is little point in worrying about that sort of stuff. It's such a small inconsequential thing to be concerned over.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
:rolleyes: Whether or not the stringer can fix the cross over with his or her thumb, a cross over is a cross over.

Will it effect anything? Probably not - especially if it’s near the throat. (If it’s at the head somewhere, then it’s possible to snap the string prematurely if you scrape the frame sufficiently, digging out drop shots, for example). But whether or not it effects anything is besides the point. It’s just sloppy, lousy form.

If the stringer plans ahead, cross overs are entirely preventable. Competent, attentive stringers don’t often (if ever) let this happen. And if they do, they fix it before the customer gets their racquet back. Anything less, calls into question the quality of the job overall, the stringer, and the shop they work out of.

With respect to damaged grommets, they tend not to take too well to an awl being abruptly forced in. Check out the indentation on the string near that damaged grommet (zoom in).
 

Kevo

Legend
If the stringer plans ahead, cross overs are entirely preventable. Competent, attentive stringers don’t often (if ever) let this happen. And if they do, they fix it before the customer gets their racquet back. Anything less, calls into question the quality of the job overall, the stringer, and the shop they work out of.
You should really rep your stringer if they're not super expensive and refer everyone to them. From what I've seen over the years at local city clubs and sporting goods stores, if all you have out of sorts with your string job is a crossover string on the outside of the frame every now and then you're doing pretty good.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
You should really rep your stringer if they're not super expensive and refer everyone to them. From what I've seen over the years at local city clubs and sporting goods stores, if all you have out of sorts with your string job is a crossover string on the outside of the frame every now and then you're doing pretty good.
I string for myself. I also string at a retail shop, and out of my house. I don’t intend to advertise my services and rates here (surely this would be a violation of forum rules). I’ll leave it at this: if you or anyone you know is in need of a recommendation for stringing services in western NY, PM me and i would be happy to help.

Your comments about local clubs and sporting goods stores fits with my experiences - sometimes the quality of work leaves much to be desired.
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
^^ Cant imagine an outcome like that is typical out of a pro event stringing room. But of course nothing is impossible.
 
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