Pain in lower back / left hip area after every session!

phl92

Professional
I know that in the end only a doctor can give me real advice, but in the current situation I try to avoid going to doctors if it's not really urgent.
So I am experiencing now already months a certain lower back pain, which occurs every time I play tennis. The pain is worst the day after I played, exactly when I get out of bed. Sometimes this movement is the most terrible. I feel quite stupid writing this since I am quite sporty, atheltic 28 years old guy, but I sound like worse than my dad with a artificial hip and leg prothese implemented. I play tennis not on a really high level (don't play matches atm but I am 'maybe' a 4.0 at max in the mom) and I play between 4-6hrs/week.

The pain is sometimes away after 1-2 days and stayed only once for more than 10 days and made me once immobile for 2-3 days where every movement/position (sitting/walking/laying&/standing) was painful. However, the pain is located in the lower back/hip area on the left side. I am quite sure that this issue occurs due to a lack of stability/weaknesses of muscles in this area. I am playing a one handed back hand, so my movements on the court are quite monotone and I guess my hip/lower back cannot handle it. When it gets bad, the pain spreads over the whole lower back.
My medical history on this is not totally blank. I had issues around the hip (in the front of my pelvis) when playing soccer 10 years ago. It occured always when doing intensive sprint sessions. I also have lower back pain since I can think when I am standing still longer than 30min somewhere. I do have a hollow-back, and I was having therapy for it several times, and I worked on it my self hard to train my gluteus, abs and my musculus biceps femoris... However I cannot say that I am having huge results.
The thing which helps me most are certain mobility ecercises such as in this video from Jeff Salzenstein (
) and I also do this exercises (
)
Once I had the next day pain really bad and couldnt really move without pain, and I was so frustrated to check the internet for exercises which could help, I thought that I found the solution because within 10minutes I was total unblocked by just doing these 4-5 exercises. I thought doing these exercises daily and especially before playing would prevent it, but it isn't. But still they help me a lot.


Since I cannot even locate / describe where the pain is exactly, I do not want to have someone giving me a diagnos what I am having. But do you guys think having a 1BH could enhance the probabilty of muscle imbalances and are there other exercises you would recommend?
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
I know that in the end only a doctor can give me real advice, but in the current situation I try to avoid going to doctors if it's not really urgent.
So I am experiencing now already months a certain lower back pain, which occurs every time I play tennis. The pain is worst the day after I played, exactly when I get out of bed. Sometimes this movement is the most terrible. I feel quite stupid writing this since I am quite sporty, atheltic 28 years old guy, but I sound like worse than my dad with a artificial hip and leg prothese implemented. I play tennis not on a really high level (don't play matches atm but I am 'maybe' a 4.0 at max in the mom) and I play between 4-6hrs/week.

The pain is sometimes away after 1-2 days and stayed only once for more than 10 days and made me once immobile for 2-3 days where every movement/position (sitting/walking/laying&/standing) was painful. However, the pain is located in the lower back/hip area on the left side. I am quite sure that this issue occurs due to a lack of stability/weaknesses of muscles in this area. I am playing a one handed back hand, so my movements on the court are quite monotone and I guess my hip/lower back cannot handle it. When it gets bad, the pain spreads over the whole lower back.
My medical history on this is not totally blank. I had issues around the hip (in the front of my pelvis) when playing soccer 10 years ago. It occured always when doing intensive sprint sessions. I also have lower back pain since I can think when I am standing still longer than 30min somewhere. I do have a hollow-back, and I was having therapy for it several times, and I worked on it my self hard to train my gluteus, abs and my musculus biceps femoris... However I cannot say that I am having huge results.
The thing which helps me most are certain mobility ecercises such as in this video from Jeff Salzenstein (
) and I also do this exercises (
)
Once I had the next day pain really bad and couldnt really move without pain, and I was so frustrated to check the internet for exercises which could help, I thought that I found the solution because within 10minutes I was total unblocked by just doing these 4-5 exercises. I thought doing these exercises daily and especially before playing would prevent it, but it isn't. But still they help me a lot.


Since I cannot even locate / describe where the pain is exactly, I do not want to have someone giving me a diagnos what I am having. But do you guys think having a 1BH could enhance the probabilty of muscle imbalances and are there other exercises you would recommend?
if you don't have disc problems, it has to do with muscles that are strained due to heavy tennis play. I have been making it worse by serving. i have no idea how i can alleviate this, i have to serve during the match. i can't underhand it because my partner will be pissed off.
 

yossarian

Professional
If you poke around in your hip and glute area, do you reproduce the pain at all? Or is it only in the low back? Does it ever radiate down the leg? Do you have normal sensation in your leg? Any clicking or catching?
 
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SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
OP, do you play left handed by any chance? For the modern game, with a lot of open stance forehands, it is common for right-handed players to develop right hip problems and left-handed players to develop left hip problems.
 

RajS

Semi-Pro
If the pain is in the lower back area, to one side, it could be an over stressed gluteus medius muscle, and there may be bursitis as well. This was my problem. There are a number of things I did to my playing style to mitigate it, and even now I have to be careful, like doing my exercises and stretching every day. You can google it, go to the webmd website , etc, and you will still not be able to pinpoint your problem, most likely, because there will be too many things that match these symptoms. Better to see a real therapist or doctor!
 

phl92

Professional
I am a right handed player and In cannot reproduce the pain just touching this areas. I never had some radiation to my leg, it's really more blocking my hip flexibility/lower back. After playing yesterday for 2hrs I have it today again, and it's not very strong but bending over to my toes is a bit uncomfortable.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Can you tell if your serve, your footwork or one of your groundstrokes appear to to be the primary stress that causes you pain? Have you tried a practice session where you are just working one of these things?

Any recent x-rays (or MRIs) of the lower back and hips? I was recently diagnosed with a scoliosis of the spine that I had previously not known about. My doctors indicated that I might very well have been born that way but never knew about it because it was so mild when I was young. But over time, the effects of scoliosis accumulated and everything became much worse.

Even if you don't see a doctor right away, it could be advantageous to see a physio / physical therapist as soon as possible. Sometimes, they will have some good insights into problems like this -- even before you get an x-ray or MRI.
 
...do you guys think having a 1BH could enhance the probabilty of muscle imbalances and are there other exercises you would recommend?
No. Read books by the world-famous back doctor John E. Sarno, M.D. His most popular book that has helped millions is "HEALING BACK PAIN". He played tennis, died at age 94,
 

phl92

Professional
Can you tell if your serve, your footwork or one of your groundstrokes appear to to be the primary stress that causes you pain? Have you tried a practice session where you are just working one of these things?

Any recent x-rays (or MRIs) of the lower back and hips? I was recently diagnosed with a scoliosis of the spine that I had previously not known about. My doctors indicated that I might very well have been born that way but never knew about it because it was so mild when I was young. But over time, the effects of scoliosis accumulated and everything became much worse.

Even if you don't see a doctor right away, it could be advantageous to see a physio / physical therapist as soon as possible. Sometimes, they will have some good insights into problems like this -- even before you get an x-ray or MRI.
I have seen a physio only 6 months ago, because of my right ankle. We also checked in some exercises my hip. As a baby/young child I was wearing some speacial 'hip pants' (no idea how to translate that from German) because one of my leg was slightly shorter. So yes, I might have a tiny scoliose like most people but nothing to outrageous.
 

phl92

Professional
If you try doing a single leg squat like this, can you keep your knee from collapsing inward?


I can do this, I have overall no problems with knees. I do have an right ankle issue which is falling inwards all the time and my right foot is totally flat. My right foot ankle is very stiff and blocked and the flexibility is only around 9cm (measure from my physio) instead of the recommended 12-14cm.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I have seen a physio only 6 months ago, because of my right ankle. We also checked in some exercises my hip. As a baby/young child I was wearing some speacial 'hip pants' (no idea how to translate that from German) because one of my leg was slightly shorter. So yes, I might have a tiny scoliose like most people but nothing to outrageous.
I believe that a leg-length discrepancy of 1.5 cm or less is not uncommon. However, if you were wearing some sort of orthopedic hip or pelvic brace to correct your LLD, then your case was likely significantly greater than this.

Sure many ppl will have a mild scoliosis in their youth that never gets much worse as they age. But that is not the case for all of us. Definitely, not in my case. Mine has gotten considerably worse -- extreme pelvic tilt -- since I was never aware of any scoliosis until recently. In my case, I started feeling pain in my lower back and tightness of my left hip flexor some 10+ years ago. Long before I ever became aware pelvic tilt and scoliosis.

Over time, a lower spine scoliosis could become worse, especially if a trauma or a repetitive injury exacerbates it. Tennis can definitely result in overuse injuries in various parts of the body. Sounds like you've experience this with various parts of your body -- possible GE/TE, lower back / hip issues and a right ankle injury. Some years back, I discovered that heel spurs on my right foot were directly responsible for developing TE of my left elbow. Because of the heel spurs, I had been compensating and was not properly loading my back leg (right leg) to hit my one-handed backhands.

The conditions and injuries that we experience in our younger years can often return with a vengeance as we get older. Your scoliosis could possibly have eventually worsened by creating tightnesses or imbalances in your body -- with fascia, ligaments, muscles, tendons, etc.

I wish that I had addressed the early warning signs more seriously 10+ years ago. My condition would probably have not gotten as bad as it did in the past 5 years if I had.
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
Low Back & hip issues always have an iliopsoas component to it.
Quadratus lumborum also comes to mind when dealing with puzzling back pain on one side.

Best to get examined by a medical professional instead of all this guesswork.

Good luck.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Low Back & hip issues always have an iliopsoas component to it.
Quadratus lumborum also comes to mind when dealing with puzzling back pain on one side.

Best to get examined by a medical professional instead of all this guesswork.

Good luck.
Yeah, the QL is one area I've been working on quite a bit with my PT. Also, the psoas and related muscle groups.

Just found out that psoas is part of the iliopsoas you mentioned. Is the tight hip flexors I had mentioned part of the psoas? Or is it the other way around -- the psoas or iliopsoas are part of a group of hip flexor muscles?

You are absolutely correct. All we can do here is present some possibilities and not a real diagnosis.
 

yossarian

Professional
Yeah, the QL is one area I've been working on quite a bit with my PT. Also, the psoas and related muscle groups.

Just found out that psoas is part of the iliopsoas you mentioned. Is the tight hip flexors I had mentioned part of the psoas? Or is it the other way around -- the psoas or iliopsoas are part of a group of hip flexor muscles?

You are absolutely correct. All we can do here is present some possibilities and not a real diagnosis.
The iliacus and psoas major both sort of fuse together and have a common insertion on the femur. Hence iliopsoas. They actually have different innervations though

anyway, yes, they’re the major hip flexors. Rectus femoris also flexes the hip but it’s role is dependent upon the position of the knee because it’s a two joint muscle. Other muscles like the sartorius are weak hip flexors.
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
Just to expand on how important the psoas (iliopsoas) is in the management of low back pain. It's muscle and fascial tissues directly connect to the intervertebral discs and lumbar vertebrae, so just think how that could affect things in that regard with spasms/restrictions and/or imbalances.

Very thick and strong muscle. The psoas component originates at the T12 vertebrae which is basically up by the diaphragm region.

So unfortunately when people try to stretch or do body work on their 'hip flexors' they wind up stretching just the hip aspect whereas they're missing a huge chunk of the psoas which is in the abdomen.

I basically tell people with low back pain when they ask why I'm working in their stomach when their pain is in their back - I work so much in their abdomen is because that their back (paraspinals, vertebrae, etc) is their back, and their abdomen is their "front of their back".

Because the iliopsoas complex and hip flexors in general are so strong and influential in the lumbar & pelvic region, that usually that's the big cause of issues (not the only thing of course). The paraspinals and other tissues in the back back usually tighten/spasm to compensate for what's happening elsewhere.
 

yossarian

Professional
Just to expand on how important the psoas (iliopsoas) is in the management of low back pain. It's muscle and fascial tissues directly connect to the intervertebral discs and lumbar vertebrae, so just think how that could affect things in that regard with spasms/restrictions and/or imbalances.

Very thick and strong muscle. The psoas component originates at the T12 vertebrae which is basically up by the diaphragm region.

So unfortunately when people try to stretch or do body work on their 'hip flexors' they wind up stretching just the hip aspect whereas they're missing a huge chunk of the psoas which is in the abdomen.

I basically tell people with low back pain when they ask why I'm working in their stomach when their pain is in their back - I work so much in their abdomen is because that their back (paraspinals, vertebrae, etc) is their back, and their abdomen is their "front of their back".

Because the iliopsoas complex and hip flexors in general are so strong and influential in the lumbar & pelvic region, that usually that's the big cause of issues (not the only thing of course). The paraspinals and other tissues in the back back usually tighten/spasm to compensate for what's happening elsewhere.
How do you release the proximal component of the psoas major? Our prof told us he doesn’t believe it’s palpable
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
How do you release the proximal component of the psoas major? Our prof told us he doesn’t believe it’s palpable
Palpating it for diagnostic purposes is pretty tough, hell even the main muscle bulk of the psoas can be pretty hard to get into on a lot of people.

But for therapeutic purposes I don't need to be directly on it. If I'm in the general area I can still get good releases. Anything hot, hard or tender is a good indication of a restriction in the tissue.

Couple different ways I can approach it:

1. Patient is supine and using digits, direct pressure into the area. If you got a patient you don't like (I kid, I kid :-D) or you need them to shut the hell up, this one works quite well. So initial gentle pressure down until I feel resistance, then I wait.....when the tissue releases I take up the slack and go further. Repeat and repeat. Ease out slowly.

2. Can do that when the patient is side-line and you are standing behind them. Usually more comfortable for the patient but can be tricky for the therapist who has to reach over the patient. Body mechanics and all.

3. Transverse plane approach: Palm of hand on the diaphragm area, and other hand directly underneath palm up. Compress hands together until resistance is felt and wait. Again, releases felt will be much more subtle, but you might feel some gurgling or other gas moving. Patient is supine or can be side lying.

All 3 you should have in conjuction with the pressure having the patient breathing diaphragmatically. Helps bring the patients awareness into the area and can aid in any releases.

4. I wish someone did a Youtube video on this, so forgive me if my description is off.

So you are seated facing the seated patient, who is ideally a little higher than you. So IE the patient is sitting on the massage/treatment table and you are on a adjustable stool. Patient drapes both hands or forearms over one of your shoulders. Therapist clasps both hands together for stability and directly and gently pushes into the diaphragm region. Again letting the patient breath diaphragmatically.....what you wind up having the patient do as they soften into things, they can flex their back and slowly wind up resting their head on their hands which is on your shoulder. As they flex, your hands can go deeper towards their back for some really deep releases. Sometimes I can turn my hands palms facing up and can reach underneath the ribs if needed.


Similar postion for when I do a bladder release except my palm(s) are facing down and as they start to release and flex I can reach behind the pubic bone.


5. Then of course there's always the workhorse technique of John Barnes Myofascial Release, the cross hand release.

Quick video I found on Youtube, obviously there's more nuances to it but it can be applied to any body part/area.

 
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To OP, read Dr. Sarno's book "HEALING BACK PAIN" and/or go see a Rolfer--he'll palpate your psoas, and then you'll find out why they call it the psoreass muscle.
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
Re: Leg Length Discrepancy

Yes, most people have some minor differences in the lengths of their legs. Of course the only true way of measuring this is X-ray-ing their legs and measuring their respective lengths.

Most of the time this discrepancy does not limit function or cause pain.

But a lot of times a shift in a person's pelvis can give an apparent LLD. IE an upslip of one side of the pelvis where one ileum is higher than the other basically brings along the femur (raised up) with it creating an illusion of an LLD esp if you're only looking at the person's ankles.

This type of situation a lot of times that pesky Quadratus lumborum is involved where it's tight and shortened thus raising the ileum. Again generally.

IME women tend to notice this more as they wind up reporting that they've had to start hemming their pants bc one pant leg looks different than the other.

You can also have a situation where an anterior rotated (or posteriorly) ileum can also give an illusion of an LLD as an anterior rotated ileum creates a relative drop in the lower extremity making that leg seem longer. Posterior rotation would do the opposite.


Any or all of these potential changes can create pain symptoms as the body attempts to correct and compensate for shifts out of the prior normal.


I always, always check for any shifts in the pelvis with any complaint and esp "Low Back Pain". Generally I like to address upslips before rotations but that's not a hard fast rule.


You really of course have to take each individual case....well individually.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
I used to work with Orthopedic doctor but they just gave me pills(diclofenac) and sent me to Physical therapists who doesn't understand Sports injury and how to treat Athletes to recover and perform in tennis.

I am thinking about going to the chiropractor.. Is there such thing as Sports injury specializing chiropractors that work with Athletes ??
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
Just to expand on how important the psoas (iliopsoas) is in the management of low back pain. It's muscle and fascial tissues directly connect to the intervertebral discs and lumbar vertebrae, so just think how that could affect things in that regard with spasms/restrictions and/or imbalances.

Very thick and strong muscle. The psoas component originates at the T12 vertebrae which is basically up by the diaphragm region.

So unfortunately when people try to stretch or do body work on their 'hip flexors' they wind up stretching just the hip aspect whereas they're missing a huge chunk of the psoas which is in the abdomen.

I basically tell people with low back pain when they ask why I'm working in their stomach when their pain is in their back - I work so much in their abdomen is because that their back (paraspinals, vertebrae, etc) is their back, and their abdomen is their "front of their back".

Because the iliopsoas complex and hip flexors in general are so strong and influential in the lumbar & pelvic region, that usually that's the big cause of issues (not the only thing of course). The paraspinals and other tissues in the back back usually tighten/spasm to compensate for what's happening elsewhere.
Have you been Icing the lower back after every tennis session ?? I really should start doing this and see how much this helps. all the Doctors tell you that you should ice the lower back after very hard tennis session. it helps with inflmmation and recovery
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Have you been Icing the lower back after every tennis session ?? I really should start doing this and see how much this helps. all the Doctors tell you that you should ice the lower back after very hard tennis session. it helps with inflmmation and recovery
ICE the lower back? Hmmm, some sources advise some ice for acute lower back pain for the first 24 hours or so. Mostly heat after that. But then, other sources advise no ice at all for most lower back issues. Best to consult with an expert on this -- but they may not all agree on this either.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Have you been Icing the lower back after every tennis session ?? I really should start doing this and see how much this helps. all the Doctors tell you that you should ice the lower back after very hard tennis session. it helps with inflmmation and recovery
Inflammation it's not always present with regards to lower back pain. Not sure about ALL doctors (or therapists). Some advise ice at the beginning for acute lower back pain. But others, who might recommend ice for other injuries, do not normally recommend ice for lower back injuries.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
Inflammation it's not always present with regards to lower back pain. Not sure about ALL doctors (or therapists). Some advise ice at the beginning for acute lower back pain. But others, who might recommend ice for other injuries, do not normally recommend ice for lower back injuries.
i play for 1 hour and pain is worse and feel like my lower back is hurting and weakening. what do you call that ?? Inflammation. so Ice must be good for that. and it may help me for another match next day. ATP players dump their entire body in the ICE bath after the match to recover faster for next day. Same concept but in my case, there is also inflammation
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
i play for 1 hour and pain is worse and feel like my lower back is hurting and weakening. what do you call that ?? Inflammation. so Ice must be good for that. and it may help me for another match next day. ATP players dump their entire body in the ICE bath after the match to recover faster for next day. Same concept but in my case, there is also inflammation
How do you know that your pain is related to inflammation? I believe that pain is possible w/o inflammation.

Don't know how reliable the following site is but it does make a distinction between mechanical lower back pain and inflammatory back pain.


More info from WebMD:
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Mechanical pain is the general term that refers to any type of back pain caused by placing abnormal stress and strain on muscles of the vertebral column. More about mechanical vs. Inflammatory pain.


A PDF from Cleveland Clinic: PDF link
 
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Rolfing is pseudoscience. Ignore that advice. See a PT or doctor
Ignore the above it's sue-do-science--unless you eventually want to be cut--if you go to enough docs eventually they'll find an anomaly on your imaging and tell you it's the "cause" of your pain and tell you to have back surgery or a hip-replacement--if that sounds attractive to you keep seeing docs. A Rolfer won't leave you crippled for life. Read "HEALING BACK PAIN" by Dr. John E. Sarno, MD--he's healed millions without cutting them. He was head of NYU Rusk Rehab Hospital--he was a "GOOD" doctor, and he played tennis!
 
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yossarian

Professional
Ignore the above it's suedo-science--unless you eventually want to be cut--if you go to enough docs eventually they'll find an anomaly on your imaging and tell you it's the "cause" of your pain and tell you to have back surgery or a hip-replacement--if that sounds attractive to you keep seeing docs. A Rolfer won't leave you crippled for life. Read "HEALING BACK PAIN" by Dr. John E. Sarno, MD--he's healed millions without cutting them. He was head of NYU Rusk Rehab Hospital--he was a "GOOD" doctor, and he played tennis!
hence why I said see a PT...

there’s a paucity of evidence (if that) to support the use of Rolfing. That’s not opinion, it’s just the best knowledge we have based on the science. A PT could do anything a Rolfer could, and their treatment would be evidence based
 
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RogueFLIP

Professional
Have you been Icing the lower back after every tennis session ?? I really should start doing this and see how much this helps. all the Doctors tell you that you should ice the lower back after very hard tennis session. it helps with inflmmation and recovery
Personally I do not ice my back after a tennis session. If I develop a pain, first I think about how it came about. My first line of offense is usually some sort of bodywork and more often than not it's using a soft ball (not softball) into areas that feel restricted or tight.

Go ahead and ice your back. Cheap, simple, very little side effects. But as SA alludes to there may be more than just inflammation (if its even that) that's causing your back pain. Ice and heat are just going to be temporary band aids to your problem, they aren't going to cure anything.

Good luck.
 
hence why I said see a PT...

there’s a paucity of evidence (if that) to support the use of Rolfing. That’s not opinion, it’s just the best knowledge we have based on the science. A PT could do anything a Rolfer could, and their treatment would be evidence based
You've obviously never been Rolfed. Trust me, there are things a Rolfer will do that a PT will NEVER do!
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
Ok, i got some update on my lower back situation. Today in the match, some very strange goings on. for whatever reason today, my lower back wasn't as bad as it usually is during Serving. I didn't use any cream today, i didn't get the orders yet. lol. I didn't do anything different except this week, i was so busy with work , i didn't do any Leg presses and Chest presses in the Gym . but i did work out with dumbells doing Sumo squats and some bicep curls, light 20 lbs dumbell, nothing big, and i did this at home. Can the leg presses and chest presses in the gym contributing to my lower back muscle problems ??
 

brianb76

Rookie
Having the exact time issue as OP. Back also tends to spasm when standing still the next couple of days.
Tens use and stretching tend to help.
Rest seems to be the main fix, but after two years of dealing off and on with this issue still no permanent solution.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
Having the exact time issue as OP. Back also tends to spasm when standing still the next couple of days.
Tens use and stretching tend to help.
Rest seems to be the main fix, but after two years of dealing off and on with this issue still no permanent solution.
So what kind of Tens do you use ? is that something i can just buy online ? Stretching helps me as well but i am kind of lazy so i don't do it everyday. I think also sitting for very long periods of time also makes it worse as well
 

brianb76

Rookie
So what kind of Tens do you use ? is that something i can just buy online ? Stretching helps me as well but i am kind of lazy so i don't do it everyday. I think also sitting for very long periods of time also makes it worse as well
I use a Tens unit I bought off amazon. Use it a couple times a day for 30 mins. It gets the blood flowing to the area and helps loosen up my back.
Yes sitting in certain positions can cause me stiffness.

Lying on my back and pulling my leg or legs to my chest seems to strech it out the best. Also putting my ankle on my knee at a 90 degree angle and pushing down streaches it out.
 

brianb76

Rookie
Anyone with th
I know that in the end only a doctor can give me real advice, but in the current situation I try to avoid going to doctors if it's not really urgent.
So I am experiencing now already months a certain lower back pain, which occurs every time I play tennis. The pain is worst the day after I played, exactly when I get out of bed. Sometimes this movement is the most terrible. I feel quite stupid writing this since I am quite sporty, atheltic 28 years old guy, but I sound like worse than my dad with a artificial hip and leg prothese implemented. I play tennis not on a really high level (don't play matches atm but I am 'maybe' a 4.0 at max in the mom) and I play between 4-6hrs/week.

The pain is sometimes away after 1-2 days and stayed only once for more than 10 days and made me once immobile for 2-3 days where every movement/position (sitting/walking/laying&/standing) was painful. However, the pain is located in the lower back/hip area on the left side. I am quite sure that this issue occurs due to a lack of stability/weaknesses of muscles in this area. I am playing a one handed back hand, so my movements on the court are quite monotone and I guess my hip/lower back cannot handle it. When it gets bad, the pain spreads over the whole lower back.
My medical history on this is not totally blank. I had issues around the hip (in the front of my pelvis) when playing soccer 10 years ago. It occured always when doing intensive sprint sessions. I also have lower back pain since I can think when I am standing still longer than 30min somewhere. I do have a hollow-back, and I was having therapy for it several times, and I worked on it my self hard to train my gluteus, abs and my musculus biceps femoris... However I cannot say that I am having huge results.
The thing which helps me most are certain mobility ecercises such as in this video from Jeff Salzenstein (
) and I also do this exercises (
)
Once I had the next day pain really bad and couldnt really move without pain, and I was so frustrated to check the internet for exercises which could help, I thought that I found the solution because within 10minutes I was total unblocked by just doing these 4-5 exercises. I thought doing these exercises daily and especially before playing would prevent it, but it isn't. But still they help me a lot.


Since I cannot even locate / describe where the pain is exactly, I do not want to have someone giving me a diagnos what I am having. But do you guys think having a 1BH could enhance the probabilty of muscle imbalances and are there other exercises you would recommend?
Every identity the exact muscle or ligament that is giving you the trouble?
 

tennisbike

Professional
Here is a seed. Focus on strengthening by slow or hold gentle squat for 20 minutes a day for 20 days.

You will feel the difference in a few days, if you have the dedication.

What you think and believe does not matter, what you do will make the difference.
 
Here is a seed. Focus on strengthening by slow or hold gentle squat for 20 minutes a day for 20 days.

You will feel the difference in a few days, if you have the dedication.

What you think and believe does not matter, what you do will make the difference.
What is a "gentle squat" as opposed to a regular squat?

And 20 minutes all in one session or broken down into shorter increments?

And what's the theory behind the efficacy?
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
Yoga and Cobra pose. do a search in Youtube for tennis and yoga. it helps big time. it helped Tommy Haas come back to tour. he had some bad lower back problems too
 

tennisbike

Professional
What is a "gentle squat" as opposed to a regular squat?
one 20 minute continuous of low intensity but long duration type of exercise. Hold the squat, not so deep. Or a slow up and down.
Think of it like a Taichi or martial art training. Look up Zhanzhuang.

The muscle is activated more.. longer than say 100 repetition. The goal is not how many you do, but how much you work the muscle..system.
This is not exactly like isometric but it strengthens without exhausts the muscles.
 

tennisbike

Professional
There are time when rest is needed, so hot tub or massage or stretching is good.
On the other hand, strengthening is needed so that the skeletal muscular system can take on challenges. Both are needed hand in hand, like yin and yang.
 

sredna42

Hall of Fame
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I know that in the end only a doctor can give me real advice, but in the current situation I try to avoid going to doctors if it's not really urgent.
So I am experiencing now already months a certain lower back pain, which occurs every time I play tennis. The pain is worst the day after I played, exactly when I get out of bed. Sometimes this movement is the most terrible. I feel quite stupid writing this since I am quite sporty, atheltic 28 years old guy, but I sound like worse than my dad with a artificial hip and leg prothese implemented. I play tennis not on a really high level (don't play matches atm but I am 'maybe' a 4.0 at max in the mom) and I play between 4-6hrs/week.

The pain is sometimes away after 1-2 days and stayed only once for more than 10 days and made me once immobile for 2-3 days where every movement/position (sitting/walking/laying&/standing) was painful. However, the pain is located in the lower back/hip area on the left side. I am quite sure that this issue occurs due to a lack of stability/weaknesses of muscles in this area. I am playing a one handed back hand, so my movements on the court are quite monotone and I guess my hip/lower back cannot handle it. When it gets bad, the pain spreads over the whole lower back.
My medical history on this is not totally blank. I had issues around the hip (in the front of my pelvis) when playing soccer 10 years ago. It occured always when doing intensive sprint sessions. I also have lower back pain since I can think when I am standing still longer than 30min somewhere. I do have a hollow-back, and I was having therapy for it several times, and I worked on it my self hard to train my gluteus, abs and my musculus biceps femoris... However I cannot say that I am having huge results.
The thing which helps me most are certain mobility ecercises such as in this video from Jeff Salzenstein (
) and I also do this exercises (
)
Once I had the next day pain really bad and couldnt really move without pain, and I was so frustrated to check the internet for exercises which could help, I thought that I found the solution because within 10minutes I was total unblocked by just doing these 4-5 exercises. I thought doing these exercises daily and especially before playing would prevent it, but it isn't. But still they help me a lot.


Since I cannot even locate / describe where the pain is exactly, I do not want to have someone giving me a diagnos what I am having. But do you guys think having a 1BH could enhance the probabilty of muscle imbalances and are there other exercises you would recommend?
Look into?:
Anterior pelvic tilt
Lateral pelvic tilt (perceived leg length discrepancy)
"dead glute" syndrome

Look into whether you have a neck/cervical issue, which is causing referred issues in your lower back/pelvis as a consequence (common)
Look into arthritis of the hip issues?

Caroline Wozniacki is young, but was forced to retire from hip arthritis, and Murray too, his hips are obviously pulverized now. But when you watch his gait between points, its enough to make you grimace the force from each step looks to just crunch his hips/pelvis.

Look into whether you have hyper-mobile joints too maybe.

I've had alot of troubles the past few years, and it is a very difficult issue to pin down precisely, trying to sift through what is cause, and what is effect.
 

Tronco20

New User
Having the same issues as the OP.
-low back pain, the worst is getting out of bed the next morning after tennis practice/match (I feel like a 90-year-old, am in early 30s)
I also have a hollow back (and scoliosis and other issues)

I think the pain has something to do with serving as well, no idea to what degree..
What I've noticed in terms of what helps a little is: the platform stance gives me less pain (the next day) than the pinpoint one - I tend to bend backwards too much doing this one. The thing is I hate serving with platform stance, feels so unnatural and I hit a lot more DFs), so I'm sacrificing my low back and still use pinpoint stance. Another thing that helps is stretching, but it's not doing wonders.
I used to have some PT for it but the exercises were a bit weird and I felt it was impossible to do them correctly on my own (without anyone watching me and correcting..) so I stopped doing them.

So, I haven't figured out how to relieve it. But when I see someone here mention "cobra pose" and things like that, I'm in pain just reading it. I think (I'm not any expert whatsoever) that for people with hollow back in the low back area, exercises like this are especially inappropriate/damaging. Or am I wrong?
 
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