Partially torn supraspinatus

TheShaun

Hall of Fame
After an MRA, I've been diagnosed with a partially torn supraspinatus (5-6mm). Dr. says no surgery at this time, but just physio and strengthening. This is an injury I've been battling for over two years, and have tried the physio stuff before, only to reach a plateau. I'm going to really give it the college try again.

Any advice? Any exercises, specifically to strengthen the back of the shoulder? Anyone recommend supplements for joint, ligament, and tendon health? I've read about Animal Flex and USP labs Super Cissus. Any experience with these?

Has anyone here had and/or come back from this without surgery?

Thanks.
 

AAAA

Hall of Fame
youtube bent-over dumbbell lateral raises

here's one link, don't be put off by the female instructor, she makes a good point I think about squeezing the shoulder blades
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyThuLw_kk4

I think bent-over dumbbell rows will also help. Pull from the elbow otherwise you may end up using too much arm strength and not really work the lateral muscle.

Those are exercises which will work however I'm not sure what you should do with your injury.

Generally my approach is to test myself with light weights, pain/discomfort = stop and wait for injury to heal.
 
5-6 mm is only 1/4 of an inch, but muscle and tendon heal very slowly, and there is no way to speed this process up (other than not using the area too soon and undoing all the healing that has gone on).
Bnd are you sure this is a fresh injury, rather than an MRI depiction of a small tear that occurred long ago?
Have you kept up with exercises at leat twice a week to prevent exacerbations of this problem?
http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/content/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=114707&itype=7418
http://www.asmi.org/SportsMed/throwing/thrower10.html
Are you going to stay in shape with running, core work, lunges
and dumbel work of your other arm so you can come back quicker after this injury heals? http://www.xlathlete.com/xl/export/...ility Collection For Tennis_1255102765892.pdf
 

Kobble

Hall of Fame
After an MRA, I've been diagnosed with a partially torn supraspinatus (5-6mm). Dr. says no surgery at this time, but just physio and strengthening. This is an injury I've been battling for over two years, and have tried the physio stuff before, only to reach a plateau. I'm going to really give it the college try again.

Any advice? Any exercises, specifically to strengthen the back of the shoulder? Anyone recommend supplements for joint, ligament, and tendon health? I've read about Animal Flex and USP labs Super Cissus. Any experience with these?

Has anyone here had and/or come back from this without surgery?

Thanks.
I had impingement problems that were helped by stretching, I still have to avoid certain exercises.
 

Ano

Hall of Fame
After an MRA, I've been diagnosed with a partially torn supraspinatus (5-6mm). Dr. says no surgery at this time, but just physio and strengthening. This is an injury I've been battling for over two years, and have tried the physio stuff before, only to reach a plateau. I'm going to really give it the college try again.

Any advice? Any exercises, specifically to strengthen the back of the shoulder? Anyone recommend supplements for joint, ligament, and tendon health? I've read about Animal Flex and USP labs Super Cissus. Any experience with these?

Has anyone here had and/or come back from this without surgery?

Thanks.
Hi TheShaun, I wish I could help you.

Unfortunately, replying a question about injuries is something I don't like to do, since I am not qualified to do so (I'm not a physical therapist. Even if I were, I wouldn't give you advice without seeing you in person).


My advice : follow the guidance of your doctor / physio therapist.

However, perhaps you could ask your physio therapist to address each of these 10 factors in your rehab:

1. Scapular stability
2. Thoracic spine range of motion
3. Glenohumeral (ball-and-socket joint) range of motion
4. Overall soft tissue quality (especially posterior capsule)
5. Rotator cuff strength
6. Cervical spine function
7. Mobility of the opposite hip
8. Mobility of the opposite ankle.
9. Core stability/force transfer
10. Breathing patterns.

You could also do the "YTWLI" if your physio allow you to : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5-PLpC2Zlo .
 
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jhp49

Rookie
Find a PT who knows traditional PT exercise techniques as well as manual manipulation treatment of the shoulder and electro-therapy systems (ultrasound therapy, electrical muscle stimulation, etc). Try some of the pain management clinics or the chiropractic clinics who also have a PT versus the orthopedic offices for such a PT. I found such a PT ( in a pain management clinic) who was recommended by a tennis team member. The PT worked wonders on my team member's torn rotator cuff and in just 6 visits over 4 weeks my shoulder is better than it has been since I jnjured it over a year ago. I actually played tennis 4 times last week. I tried just the PT exercises for over a year wth no success. I think the key is the combination of therapies this PT uses and his expertise in the functions of the shoulder.
 

blueman2

New User
After an MRA, I've been diagnosed with a partially torn supraspinatus (5-6mm). Dr. says no surgery at this time, but just physio and strengthening. This is an injury I've been battling for over two years, and have tried the physio stuff before, only to reach a plateau. I'm going to really give it the college try again.

Any advice? Any exercises, specifically to strengthen the back of the shoulder? Anyone recommend supplements for joint, ligament, and tendon health? I've read about Animal Flex and USP labs Super Cissus. Any experience with these?

Has anyone here had and/or come back from this without surgery?

Thanks.
TheShaun,

I'm in the same boat now as you were 5 months ago and just wanted to know how you made out?

Thanks
 

dancemyth

New User
I had a supraspinatus tear that I spent 6 months trying to rehab, unsuccessfully. It turned out that I had a bone spur on my acromion (bony extension of the collarbone that forms the "point" of the shoulder. The bone spur was abrading the tendon, preventing it from healing. Surgery was the answer for me. This kind of impingement is a common problem (particularly for those 40+). Sometime PT can relieve impingement, by strengthening rotator cuff muscles and changing the mechanics of the joint, but sometimes there just ain't enough room in there. A good PT will be able to tell after a couple of months if you're making progress.
 

blueman2

New User
thanks Dancemyth

That's the info I'm looking for. Did they have to repair the muscle as well or just re-contour the bone and did they know that before they went in?

How long before you were back on the court?
 

dancemyth

New User
The tendon had a pretty good-sized tear (this isn't always the case with impingement), so they had to suture it as well as remove the bone spur and re-shape the bone. They also found that I had a torn labrum and repaired that as well. The labrum was actually the bigger deal. I hadn't used the shoulder under load in years, so I had a long recovery. It took me 9 months to pick up a racquet. I do not believe this is typical, so don't let me scare you with that.
 
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