people from cold windy climates who don't own cars: what winter jacket gets your through the -15 to -25 degree days?

Azure

Legend
I have a very silly question - if you wear thick woollen undergarments, do you then start wearing clothes which are a size or two bigger than normal? If yes, would you then have a completely different wardrobe set of one size for the summers and another for the winters? The same for shoes too?
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I have a very silly question - if you wear thick woollen undergarments, do you then start wearing clothes which are a size or two bigger than normal? If yes, would you then have a completely different wardrobe set of one size for the summers and another for the winters? The same for shoes too?
Parkas are generously cut to allow layering.

I do have pieces in different sizes and cuts for layering.
 

Azure

Legend
Parkas are generously cut to allow layering.

I do have pieces in different sizes and cuts for layering.
Thanks so essentially if you buy a size 28 formal pants for summer, you will have a size 30 for winter? Also what about formal shoes?
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
Thanks so essentially if you buy a size 28 formal pants for summer, you will have a size 30 for winter? Also what about formal shoes?
You will need a size 30 (or maybe even 32) for winter for completely different reasons.



Eddie Bauer down coat. I use the one designed for the Maine park rangers.
I remember some years ago someone here asked for a good travel vest that can bridge the gap between formal wear and casual. He was presented with multiple solutions to which he kept putting stranger and stranger additional requirements, until finally he put forward his idea of formal: an Eddie Bauer vest that was like something you would use exactly for shooting and generally going in the woods. Such was his idea of "formal".

:cool:
 

Soul

Semi-Pro
I also found cashmere much warmer than wool. A bit pricer typically, but when I lived in the frozen tundra of the mid west I found cashmere and cashmere blends much warmer than wool.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I also found cashmere much warmer than wool. A bit pricer typically, but when I lived in the frozen tundra of the mid west I found cashmere and cashmere blends much warmer than wool.
I have wool and cashmere pieces but synthetics are just easier to care for.
 

Big_Dangerous

Talk Tennis Guru
I have a very silly question - if you wear thick woollen undergarments, do you then start wearing clothes which are a size or two bigger than normal? If yes, would you then have a completely different wardrobe set of one size for the summers and another for the winters? The same for shoes too?
Might be easier to just move to a climate with warmer weather. ;)

But seriously though, I would prefer a climate where the temperature stays between 60-100 Fahrenheit all year round. In fact, if given the choice between like super hot and humid weather, and having to deal with below freezing temperatures and snow, I'd choose the heat/humidity everyday of the week and twice on Sunday.
 

nyta2

Semi-Pro
1) How long did you own your winter jacket?
2) any issues?
3) How long did you shop around before deciding on the one you have
4) what other models did you consider before committing?
what are you using it for?
if very active, like hiking, pay the premium to get something warm yet breathable, and often form fitting, and layer up, so you can shed as you get warm from activity.
if not active... can just go with the bulky puffy jackets, like 800 fill or something... just know if you're doing something active, you'll get hot, and can get in the way cuz they are bulky

i have an down 800 filled puffy jacket... for walking my dog, or similar low activity. can go out in 0F with just a teeshirt underneath
but when snowboarding in say 0F... i'll typically have 3 layers... base for wicking, heavy form fitting warm mid, and outside layer for water shedding/wind barrier (with zipper vents in the arm pits for example when you start to overheat from activity)
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
I also found cashmere much warmer than wool. A bit pricer typically, but when I lived in the frozen tundra of the mid west I found cashmere and cashmere blends much warmer than wool.
It is because they typically are, but a good cashmere pullover costs 3 to 4 times more than a comparable merino wool one. The ones with silk and cashmere are even warmer (and pricier). My wife recently bought one from Façonnable (70% cashmere, 30% silk) the price of which nearly gave me a heart attack.

:cool:
 

Azure

Legend
Might be easier to just move to a climate with warmer weather. ;)

But seriously though, I would prefer a climate where the temperature stays between 60-100 Fahrenheit all year round. In fact, if given the choice between like super hot and humid weather, and having to deal with below freezing temperatures and snow, I'd choose the heat/humidity everyday of the week and twice on Sunday.
I have been in cities that have both - dry heat and humid, sticky heat at 40 deg C + weather. It's horrible - you can't breathe that air at times. Extremes are always bad actually. That said, you don't have to purchase two sets of clothes in different sizes like in extreme winter :cautious:
 
Why worry? Global warming is advancing so rapidly that we will be wearing swim suits in February very soon. That is, unless a new president snaps his fingers and orders global warming to stop.
Hear! Hear! It is decreed by his majesty that ALL tennis players migrate to Palm Springs or Florida and flap their wings to counteract gobble swarming. Condolences to our Canuckian friends to the North, who without a decree from their Queen, the border must remain closed due to the wu-wu19 and they must snow-shoe around the courts for the duration of the globular pamdimick.
 
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