Playing in the heat

tennis4me

Hall of Fame
Random topic ... Was watching 2017 FSP Gold River Women's Challenger and I was curious about the temperature since the commentator mentioned something about "dry heat". Damn ... 99-100F!!! They don't seem to get affected by the heat.

Other than the usual drink plenty of liquids before, during, and after, etc. Any other quick tips the players from Sacramento area have to survive playing the heat in that area? Just train in the heat??

I know some USTA sectionals sometimes play in Gold River/Sacramento area, naturally the players from that area will have an advantage since they're more used to that severe heat -- especially in summer. For fun, USTA should have the sectionals play in San Francisco area during winter at 8a in the morning where temperature sometimes drop to high 30s and low 40s. :D
 
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Sirius Black

Guest
Random topic ... Was watching 2017 FSP Gold River Women's Challenger and I was curious about the temperature since the commentator mentioned something about "dry heat". Damn ... 99-100F!!! They don't seem to get affected by the heat.

Other than the usual drink plenty of liquids before, during, and after, etc. Any other quick tips the players from Sacramento area have to survive playing the heat in that area? Just train in the heat??

I know some USTA sectionals sometimes play in Gold River/Sacramento area, naturally the players from that area will have an advantage since they're more used to that severe heat -- especially in summer. For fun, USTA should have the sectionals play in San Francisco area during winter at 8a in the morning where temperature sometimes drop to high 30s and low 40s. :D

Dry heat is much more manageable than humidity. Unless it gets to like 115 or something ridiculous and Arizona-esque
 

tennis4me

Hall of Fame
Yes, of course dry heat is more tolerable. I'm spoiled by mild weather. I once hit in 90-ish F >85% humidity and lasted only about half hour, drenched from head to toes.

I don't know now, but I remember USTA Nationals used to be held in Arizona each year. In summer, I believe. Brutal.
 

tennis4me

Hall of Fame
Ok, the 27yr old Danielle Lao just took a medical timeout from the heat exhaustion. The 23yr old Danielle Collins seems to be still OK. This reminds me of the heat issues during Australian Open.
 

tennis4me

Hall of Fame
100-104 where I live in the upcoming week. I get out early at 6 am and am in by 9.
That's the way to do it! When I trek to the side of the world where 80% or more year-round humidity is the norm, I wake up at 5am and on the court by 5:45a (indoor). Hard core? Yes. :D The alternative at the time was playing at 3pm or 4pm (indoor no A/C, which is worst in the heat) and drenched in 30 minutes with wringable T-shirt that drips faster than a gazelle running from cheetah -- not to mention the body overheat.
 

jaggy

Talk Tennis Guru
When you hear harps and see dead relatives dressed in white and beckoning you to them it is a good time to take a rest.
 

mikeler

Moderator
It's wonderful playing on hard courts (while the 3.5 players use up all the clay courts) between 12 and 4 at USTA Sectionals this weekend in Central Florida. 95 degrees and high humidity. Even loading up on electrolytes constantly on changeovers, I had some mild cramps after the match.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
I know some USTA sectionals sometimes play in Gold River/Sacramento area, naturally the players from that area will have an advantage since they're more used to that severe heat -- especially in summer. For fun, USTA should have the sectionals play in San Francisco area during winter at 8a in the morning where temperature sometimes drop to high 30s and low 40s. :D

Ha! Try playing at 0800 on courts near the Ocean or on top of hills. Not only is it cold, but the fog sometimes comes down on deck so you can't even see the other players. It's Summer in the City [cue the Mark Twain remark.]
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
Grew up playing in the heat of summer in New Orleans, so I am pretty much used to it. My advantage extends even over most other Southerners who tend to hide inside in the AC on most hotter days. I definitely have the advantage this time of year against most opponents in matches scheduled in the afternoons. Evenings can go either way. The heat and humidity favor my game, the lights give some trouble to may aging eyes.

Most of my hitting partners prefer not to play in the hottest part of the day. But I maintain my edge by mountain biking 50 miles a week this time of year. A lot of that is in the heat of the day.

In actual matches: 1) Drink a lot 2) Catch all the shade you can (changeovers, etc.) 3) Dress for the heat. I wear a white ball cap and white shirt to stay cooler 4) Get out of sweat drenched clothes quickly. Bring extra shirts and change on court. Bring dry shorts and undies and change on any bathroom breaks.
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
Dry heat is much more manageable than humidity. Unless it gets to like 115 or something ridiculous and Arizona-esque


Yeah, to a certain level. Up until the last year I never even thought about any kind of heat. Just so used to playing in 115+ and 100 and 70%+ humidity. Arizona gets it all. Was just in the Sac area and played a few hours in that 100+ and high humidity. Had to laugh since I was the only one on ANY courts. lol.

Anyway, As everyone knows, hydration is key. But that starts the day before with continual water intake. Then when on court you need smaller sips more often to keep hydrated and to not get a stomach ache. I see to many inexperienced players taking big gulps and that causes issues. You also learn to slow down your overall pace between points and take allotted time. Deep, DEEP breathing helps and in the worst cases I have a wet towel at the back of the court I can spin around a few times to cool and I towel my head and back of neck, which feel like heaven. Carry a good dozen wrist bands for BOTH wrist, and some hat or band to keep to manage sweat on the racquet and in your eyes.

It takes a certain mental mindset too, that you want to be on court and not focusing on how hot it is. Training in heat often helps, but if you don't like the heat you will be dreading being on court in it, and it is very self-defeating.
 

tennis4me

Hall of Fame
Good advises. I wonder, maybe due to body differences, some people will never get used to or be able to play in such extreme heat no matter how they train/practice.

Is there any place that sells those strings of ice-pack that wraps around the neck that the tournaments dole out in those hot day Pro matches?
 

tennis4me

Hall of Fame
Ha! Try playing at 0800 on courts near the Ocean or on top of hills. Not only is it cold, but the fog sometimes comes down on deck so you can't even see the other players. It's Summer in the City [cue the Mark Twain remark.]
Yeah - you can tell who the tourists are in SF in the summer. They dress like it's summer :cool:, then buy the "San Francisco" sweatshirt in the evening. :)
 

mikeler

Moderator
IMHO, I don't believe in changing out wet shirts. Your body is producing the sweat to cool you off. When you switch to a dry shirt, now you have taken away some of the cooling power your body has provided. I can barely walk in to a place with AC after I finish playing in the summer because it feels so cold. On the other hand, being soaking wet can be annoying so I can understand why people do it. Different strokes for different folks...
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
IMHO, I don't believe in changing out wet shirts. Your body is producing the sweat to cool you off. When you switch to a dry shirt, now you have taken away some of the cooling power your body has provided. I can barely walk in to a place with AC after I finish playing in the summer because it feels so cold. On the other hand, being soaking wet can be annoying so I can understand why people do it. Different strokes for different folks...

I used to change shirts often when I wore cotton tshirts... a soaked shirt made you feel 5lbs heavier. But these wick-away shirts are great ... hardly ever need to change a shirt in a match anymore. Of course, not playing a 2.5 hour tournament singles match in July and August helps.
 
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Sirius Black

Guest
IMHO, I don't believe in changing out wet shirts. Your body is producing the sweat to cool you off. When you switch to a dry shirt, now you have taken away some of the cooling power your body has provided. I can barely walk in to a place with AC after I finish playing in the summer because it feels so cold. On the other hand, being soaking wet can be annoying so I can understand why people do it. Different strokes for different folks...

yeah but it's the evaporation of sweat off the skin that cools you down, not the action of sweating itself. A saturated shirt is going to take a lot longer to liberate the sweat it's collected
 

wings56

Hall of Fame
Yes, of course dry heat is more tolerable. I'm spoiled by mild weather. I once hit in 90-ish F >85% humidity and lasted only about half hour, drenched from head to toes.

I don't know now, but I remember USTA Nationals used to be held in Arizona each year. In summer, I believe. Brutal.

I don't think 85% humidity is hardly possible with 90 degree temperature. Probably closer to 55-60%
 

wings56

Hall of Fame
Yeah, to a certain level. Up until the last year I never even thought about any kind of heat. Just so used to playing in 115+ and 100 and 70%+ humidity. Arizona gets it all. Was just in the Sac area and played a few hours in that 100+ and high humidity. Had to laugh since I was the only one on ANY courts. lol.

Anyway, As everyone knows, hydration is key. But that starts the day before with continual water intake. Then when on court you need smaller sips more often to keep hydrated and to not get a stomach ache. I see to many inexperienced players taking big gulps and that causes issues. You also learn to slow down your overall pace between points and take allotted time. Deep, DEEP breathing helps and in the worst cases I have a wet towel at the back of the court I can spin around a few times to cool and I towel my head and back of neck, which feel like heaven. Carry a good dozen wrist bands for BOTH wrist, and some hat or band to keep to manage sweat on the racquet and in your eyes.

It takes a certain mental mindset too, that you want to be on court and not focusing on how hot it is. Training in heat often helps, but if you don't like the heat you will be dreading being on court in it, and it is very self-defeating.


LOL. You can't hardly have humidity much above 60% when you're talking about temperatures over 100F!
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
LOL. You can't hardly have humidity much above 60% when you're talking about temperatures over 100F!

The way I said that wasn't clear. It is the point about Arizona being a dry heat though, which it isn't as during July and August (sometimes into Sept). Like yesterday, coolest it got was 80 first thing in the morning and almost 70% humidity. High was at 100 degrees and the humidity does drop to around 35%, but when the storms hit it inverts again and we end up in the 90's with about 40% to 50% humidity. And this is a bit cooler and less extreme than other years, which has been really nice. We didn't get consistent humidity above 30% until mid-July'ish, but temps in that 115 range with 10-20% humidity happens.

While we are not the hottest when it is humid, we certainly are not always a dry heat on the index. I travel to Texas often and have played there, which is ugly humidity but doesn't feel as sizzling hot with the sun. At some point it is all relative and just hot and muggy.
 
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Nacho

Hall of Fame
Grew up playing in Atlanta.....Need to drink at least a gallon of water the day before and even that day. No Sodas, limit the coffee....keep your blood sugar levels balanced during the match, have a banana or something after the first set. Or mix in a little gatorade....Your diet should be very basic as well, I do Paleo and it works fine for energy....Not too many carbs...And I agree with at least having a supply of extra cloths/socks...in case you want to change. The more weight you carry the more the heat will be tough, but if you eat and drink right you'll be fine.
 

nvr2old

Hall of Fame
Played today at about 1000 am. 89 degrees with 48% humidity and light thunder showers had me sweating like Nadal!
 
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