Playing people a lot worse than you...

GPG

Semi-Pro
It may be really hard to play a worse player becasue you are used to recieve bombs from your opponent (if you normally play at a high level). Just be patient, they'll miss a shot before you
 

anantak2k

Semi-Pro
It's tough at the beginning. But this only means that you are not as good as you think you are. You are at that stage where you can play great when pushed but your level drops when you play players worse than you.

When you improve a little bit more you will notice that you will have a really easy time beating players much worse than you. You just need a little bit more experience.
I think the problem is that you are used to pace and when you get no pace you hit more UEs because you have a bit of a problem creating your own pace.

A little further improvement and you will bea beating these guys 60 60.
 

Steady Eddy

Legend
No, I don't understand this, and I dispute this. One time, after being frustrated at not getting into the higher rounds of tournaments, I played at a lower level. Not only did I win the tournament, I didn't drop a game, which showed that I didn't belong there. I'm only a 3.5, but against inexperienced players, not only will they not get a game off of me, I can see to it that they don't get a point. The only requirement is consistency, and not even much of that is needed.

Stop hitting the ball so hard. Something is very wrong if a beginner gets 4 games in a set. Learn ball control. Not only should you master keeping it in play, but you should be able to place the ball where you like. Being hit and miss is not what tennis is about, no matter how hard you slug it.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
I think you should always crush those that are actually below your level. Makes them find their level in life, and you too.
If they get 4 games, then it's close, and you're NOT that much better than them.
However, you have to play more often than ONE set a month...against each other. Take the compilation of 10 sets, if once they get 4, but the others less than ONE, then you are truly better than them.
 

bodieq

Rookie
Sorry to say this but if your score against a "beginner" (i.e. he's only been playing tennis a couple months as you said) is 6-3,6-4...you can't possibly be more than a low-3.0 level player. And you definitely aren't hitting "heavy topspin" of anything...
 

dizzlmcwizzl

Hall of Fame
I tend to agree that allowing 7 games over two sets against a complete beginner is unlikely .... especially if your correct about being competitive later int he week against a player that has had points at one time. Either the beginner is no beginner or you over estimate your ATP friend.

That being said I was noticing something along similiar, athough not as drastic lines last night. I was playing singles in a USTA match against another player rated at my ability level. I was much better than he was and I did not expect to be challenged during the match. This was true for much of the match until I became bored and started watching the other singles match between points. This lack of focus let the other guy win 3 games in the 2nd set before I woke up and put him away.

I guess it is possible to be lulled to sleep if your that much better than your opponent but a seasoned player (at any level above 3.0) should not lose a game to a beginner.
 

RD 7

Rookie
Emotions 101.

When you're supposed to lose, you have the luxury of hitting out. You can play aggressive and confident.

When you're supposed to win, your game can sometimes be weighted down by a fear of losing.

I love playing when I have nothing to lose.
 

Marshredder

Semi-Pro
Sorry to say this but if your score against a "beginner" (i.e. he's only been playing tennis a couple months as you said) is 6-3,6-4...you can't possibly be more than a low-3.0 level player. And you definitely aren't hitting "heavy topspin" of anything...
I play on a national level at a D1 equivalent university.

Its just inexperience at playing really bad players, its the first time I've played one in a year or two, so I wasn't sure how to adjust my game. The awesome guy I played I lost, but it was 7-6(10) 6-2 7-6(7) to him, so I gave him a run for his money... I said i'd play the new guy again tomorrow, see how it goes.
 

raiden031

Legend
Sorry to say this but if your score against a "beginner" (i.e. he's only been playing tennis a couple months as you said) is 6-3,6-4...you can't possibly be more than a low-3.0 level player. And you definitely aren't hitting "heavy topspin" of anything...
Agreed. Never, ever, ever does a player who is more than say 0.5 levels below me cause me any sort of problems whatsoever. I can beat them even on my worst days. I don't even need a strategy other than to just hit the ball and they will hit errors first.

I find it very hard to believe that some D1-equivalent player played a competitive match against a beginner because he "wasn't used to playing beginners". The reason I don't buy this one bit, is that a high level player is trained to overcome any type of strategy thrown at them by their opponents. They can overcome junk balls, pushers, big serves, slice & dicers, you name it and they have an answer for it...that is why they are high level players.
 

autumn_leaf

Hall of Fame
as others have said, consistency is what matters when playing lower level players. i consider myself a 3.0-3.5 but i have way more experience playing than the newer people in my tennis class in college. they still dink the ball, try for too much in inappropriate times, bad footwork, you name it. but i usually start up losing 1-4 until i start pushing in my serves and really concentrate on getting the ball in. after that it usually becomes a 6-4 win.

the point is :

- i tried way too hard on my serves like i did against better players when i didn't have to (caused a lot of bad 2nd serves and DFs)

- i tried to blast winners when i got a weak ball instead of setting up a good approach shot for an easier finish

- i got lazy because i knew i was better than them

i still don't get if you're able to play well (i would like to know the score or your definition of well) against a pro why you aren't able to beat a dinker. seems like consistency should be a breeze for you, unless you got overconfident and wanted to show that you're a macho man or something.
 

Steady Eddy

Legend
I play on a national level at a D1 equivalent university.

Its just inexperience at playing really bad players, its the first time I've played one in a year or two, so I wasn't sure how to adjust my game. The awesome guy I played I lost, but it was 7-6(10) 6-2 7-6(7) to him, so I gave him a run for his money... I said i'd play the new guy again tomorrow, see how it goes.
When I started tennis, my older brother who knew about tennis more than I did believed this. He said that really bad players would beat good players, because good players rarely played anyone so bad, and they didn't know how to play them. So, because I was so bad, I could get lots of games off him now, but as I would improve, he'd get more shut outs. I found this really confusing. I wondered, "What if a beginner could get into the draw at Wimbledon?" Would they take the championship because no one would know how to play someone so bad?

There's a little bit of truth to this. A good player will easily beat a bad player, he just doesn't look very good doing it. You do look worse when you play beginners, and you never get warmed up, and you don't get any rhythm. But it goes too far to say that you'll lose lots of points to them. The only "strategy" you need is to be consistent. But that shouldn't call for making changes, you always need to be consistent to win. I think these close sets should be a sort of wake up call, in that they're showing you that you give away too many points. Maybe you shouldn't hit as hard as you did in college? At least make your opponent earn their points. One cannot beat beginners making lots of UEs, but you can't beat good players doing that either.
 

raiden031

Legend
as others have said, consistency is what matters when playing lower level players. i consider myself a 3.0-3.5 but i have way more experience playing than the newer people in my tennis class in college. they still dink the ball, try for too much in inappropriate times, bad footwork, you name it. but i usually start up losing 1-4 until i start pushing in my serves and really concentrate on getting the ball in. after that it usually becomes a 6-4 win.

the point is :

- i tried way too hard on my serves like i did against better players when i didn't have to (caused a lot of bad 2nd serves and DFs)

- i tried to blast winners when i got a weak ball instead of setting up a good approach shot for an easier finish

- i got lazy because i knew i was better than them

i still don't get if you're able to play well (i would like to know the score or your definition of well) against a pro why you aren't able to beat a dinker. seems like consistency should be a breeze for you, unless you got overconfident and wanted to show that you're a macho man or something.
Since you are a 3.0-3.5 player, the reason you have trouble against dinkers is because they bring out weaknesses in your game. Players at this level tend to have deficiencies in footwork that come out when you face junk balls (ie. balls that have very different trajectories and don't give you any rhythm). Also if you aren't used to getting alot of opportunities to put away balls, then you can beat yourself with errors when you do get the chance.

But someone who is 5.0+ has developed the footwork to handle junk balls and can put away weak balls at will, otherwise they would get stuck competing at lower levels.

So really it is a big fallacy when someone thinks they are a 'good' player because they can hit hard with topspin, but they have these huge holes in their game like poor footwork that make them worse than they think.
 

Slazenger07

Banned
Sorry to say this but if your score against a "beginner" (i.e. he's only been playing tennis a couple months as you said) is 6-3,6-4...you can't possibly be more than a low-3.0 level player. And you definitely aren't hitting "heavy topspin" of anything...
Yea gonna have to agree, if that was your score against a beginner your overstating your skill level by quite a bit. Hate to be the bearer of bad news but that's just the truth. A Dv1 level player would easily be able to adjust their game to a beginner and the score would not even be close. The beginner would win few points little lone games.
 
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beernutz

Hall of Fame
I play on a national level at a D1 equivalent university.

Its just inexperience at playing really bad players, its the first time I've played one in a year or two, so I wasn't sure how to adjust my game. The awesome guy I played I lost, but it was 7-6(10) 6-2 7-6(7) to him, so I gave him a run for his money... I said i'd play the new guy again tomorrow, see how it goes.
The state of British tennis must be worse than I thought.
 

pyrokid

Hall of Fame
This happened to me when I was smaller.
I just forced myself to take 10 steps between shots. And always swing out, no matter how embarrassing it might be to lose a point to this guy in front of my coach.
 
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