Please Critique my Groundstrokes :D

#4
I see the video is from a while ago. First impressions are you need a better hitting partner, that was not good practice for you. Someone who can keep a basic rally going
 

sredna42

Professional
#7

Hi, I’ve been playing tennis for about a year and I recorded myself rallying with a friend. I’d love to improve my game and see what needs to be fixed first. I have tons of problems with my game and I’d like to reaffirm my suspicions. Thank you, 10S
You have a better 2hbh than mine after only a year LOL jesus I suck at this game
 

sredna42

Professional
#8
0. Get a coach
1. Learn to split step
2. When you hit a good one, remember the feel of that shot, take a second to let it burn in
3. Think less about how you are hitting the ball (your forehand and backhand look OK enough, and will fine tune themselves with time and a coach) and think more about where you are hitting it, why, and what shot you are expecting back
4. Probably best not to take any of my advice come to think of it
 
#13

Hi, I’ve been playing tennis for about a year and I recorded myself rallying with a friend. I’d love to improve my game and see what needs to be fixed first. I have tons of problems with my game and I’d like to reaffirm my suspicions. Thank you, 10S
Imagine a line between you two shoulders and a line between your two hips. Imagine the angle that your would see viewing these two lines from above. That angle was being called separation by tennis researchers around 2000. The muscles in your abdomen can become stretched and add to your strokes. The legs can also rotate your hips for more uppermost body turn.

Now start looking at high level ATP players, especially Djokovic for separation. Look at the timing and speed of the uppermost body turn (the line between the two shoulders). The shoulders back farther than the hips to stretch abdominal and spine muscles. On the forward swing the hips start earlier than the shoulders and that farther stretches muscles. Observe how rapidly the WTA lady tennis players now rotate their uppermost bodies. Be careful with doing these rotations.

To do stop action single frame on Youtube use the "." and "," keys.
Note - Djokovic is very flexible and has occasional back issues. Don't copy his range of motion, it might be an injury risk. Don't copy separation if you have had back issues.

There are many posts describing forehand separation. Recommend that you search separation Chas. Also search separation tennis forehand pictures Always start researching new topics by terms for the new topic plus the words "pictures" or "images". Click on the pictures to find webpage with it and to see if the website has useful information. Google searches often work better than the forum search, use both.

The book Technique Development for Tennis Stroke Production, Elliott, Reid, Crespo is very good for the logic of the biomechanics of tennis. The book has become expensive since the ITF stopped offering it.

Here is a brief review article by one of the leading tennis researchers and one of the authors of that book.
Biomechanics and Tennis , B. Elliott
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2577481/

"PMC" publications are free on line publications on sports, biomechanics and injuries, etc. Most are high quality publications.
 
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#14
For only a year of play you're looking good!

As some have said, the best thing you can do is get a coach. Right now is a critical time in development for you. Your strokes look nice, especially the backhand, the forehand is not too far off. You're top spin is fine, keep focusing on following through your swing and depth (depth is arguably the most import part of hitting a solid ground-stroke). Key is to keep developing and working on all aspects of your game, that will make you a more rounded player and will make you more solid later on. There are some posters on here with extremely valuable advice, but those are far and few in between.

Nothing replaces time spent on the court.

Best of luck!
 
#15
If that is one year ... and you aren't punking us ;), holy cr@p. I only watched three minutes ... never seen smooth full strokes like that in a year. You have natural talent written all over that one year. I assume you have had hitting hours with stronger partners. How old are you?

Looking forward to year two video.

You have to be punking us. :eek:

btw ... I hate you ... you should have to work hard at tennis like the rest of us.
 
#16
Your chest seems pointing to the sky in FH. Not so in BH.

Imagine an arrow perpendicularly shot at tour chest. Now play. At the moment of ball contact where does the arrow point in the up-down axis? Ignore left the left-right axis.

Should be pointing at the horizon.

From the camera's perspective, in FH your chest points to the top of the shorter tree at the dead middle of the screen, which is too high. In BH it points to the white net cord of the other court in the back.

But if you don't feel having pointing up, maybe I see it wrong.
 
#18
If that is one year ... and you aren't punking us ;), holy cr@p. I only watched three minutes ... never seen smooth full strokes like that in a year. You have natural talent written all over that one year. I assume you have had hitting hours with stronger partners. How old are you?

Looking forward to year two video.

You have to be punking us. :eek:

btw ... I hate you ... you should have to work hard at tennis like the rest of us.
Wow thanks for such kind words. I’ve been consistently hitting over the year and I’ve watched tons of videos of course. I turned 17 today and no I wouldn’t say I’ve had many strong partners. More or less I almost exclusively hit with my friend in the video. I think my friends strokes are pretty clean as well and his backhand is much better. Consistency is definitely a problem for the both of us as seen in some of these ridiculous misses.
 
#19
Wow thanks for such kind words. I’ve been consistently hitting over the year and I’ve watched tons of videos of course. I turned 17 today and no I wouldn’t say I’ve had many strong partners. More or less I almost exclusively hit with my friend in the video. I think my friends strokes are pretty clean as well and his backhand is much better. Consistency is definitely a problem for the both of us as seen in some of these ridiculous misses.
Practice with 6 balls, less walking
 
#21
Added some mathchplay with my serve.
My strokes clearly get weaker and my serve has a lot of problems with consistency
Looks good. Since you and your opponent are learning the game I would recommend playing points half the time instead of matches full time. You serve 20 balls. If they're close play out the point, have the returner try different things. Then switch, the other guy serves 20.
First point was sweet.
I definitely think starting level of players is high due to slo mo video and yt coaches.
 
#23
Wow thanks for such kind words. I’ve been consistently hitting over the year and I’ve watched tons of videos of course. I turned 17 today and no I wouldn’t say I’ve had many strong partners. More or less I almost exclusively hit with my friend in the video. I think my friends strokes are pretty clean as well and his backhand is much better. Consistency is definitely a problem for the both of us as seen in some of these ridiculous misses.
17 ... for one year ... yeah ... I don't like you any better since the last post. Tell your buddy I don't like him either. So you two, no coaches ... watching video. That sentence wasn't for you ... it was for my ttw friends.

I only watched the first 3 minutes of your match video ... but I definitely will watch all of it. Serve looks good too? :mad: @Hmgraphite1 just gave you great advice if your goal is to get better faster ... include drills along with matches. It will be fun if you two can improve together. I became good friends with two guys in 4.0 singles tournaments, and we all eventually moved to 4.5s together after playing a lot of practice singles matches against each other. Another thing that would be good is if you can find a higher level singles player that both of you could play. Leave the stronger player on the court, and you two rotate in playing short tiebreakers, or a game ... just make it fun and short so one guy isn't sitting out too long.

Playing points is a different thing than looking good hitting balls from the baseline isn't it ... not to mention the bomb scare near you guys :p when you get near the net. I hit quite a lot with a 2 year rookie this summer. If you watched the right points when he was at the baseline, he could look like a high level player. But one volley, one overhead ... or if I hit him a low 1hbh slice ... and back to beginner.

Your 2hbh is going to be WAY good if you get to play enough against skilled players. (y)
 
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Wise one

Professional
#24

Hi, I’ve been playing tennis for about a year and I recorded myself rallying with a friend. I’d love to improve my game and see what needs to be fixed first. I have tons of problems with my game and I’d like to reaffirm my suspicions. Thank you, 10S

Don't place your hand so low on the grip. Place the hand so that there is some of the handle visible at the bottom.
 
#25
@Christopher Cho You're still young and it depends on where you wanna go with your playing. If at minimal you just wanna be self taught and play recreational then soak up as much knowledge as you can through watching pro videos and such.

Find good players to play with, that is the fastest way to improve cause they will make you step up your game. I think your technique is very good for your age, it will improve with time. Keep at it.
 
#26
Hi, I’ve been playing tennis for about a year and I recorded myself rallying with a friend. I’d love to improve my game and see what needs to be fixed first. I have tons of problems with my game and I’d like to reaffirm my suspicions. Thank you, 10S
Work on your footwork: you are flat-footed, no split step, no dynamic balance. Good footwork will pay off handsomely as you progress.

Compare what you look like just before your opponent hits to any pro: they have bent knees, a low center of gravity, and are ready to pounce; you look like you're waiting for the bus. Of course, that's how one commentator remarked about McEnroe but he was an outlier.

Well-done on posting your video! You're doing a great job for having only played one year.



 
#27
Just my 2 cents, I'm not an expert but I do have some suggestions for you.

I also resumed playing tennis after a long hiatus from HS (tbh I wasn't serious playing tennis back then, I had no idea what I was doing). After a year of playing, I would say I am definitely in your shoes as I have went through the same exact progression and I have feedback that I think I can help you to improve your groundstroke a lot better.

But keep in mind that tennis is not a state, it is a process, that means you cannot rush it as your body and brain just can't grasp all the advanced concept all at once, you need to work it out one part at a time. So regular shadow swing, take mental notes and practice specific strokes is very important to get better. (also find different people to hit with helps a lot, esp people better than you)

1) Preparation: I keep hearing people say split steps, in my mind, that means nothing at this level, at your level what you want to think about is, how can I be early to prepare my stroke? And how do I do it?

Based on the video, I would say imagine you are predicting where your hitting partner is going to hit to, either left or right, how would you position your feet and your body so that you are prepared to go either left or right quickly?

The answer is, make a triangle! If your feet is wide open, it is a lot easier to move around and be stable at the same time. If you keep your legs closed, you will just not have that flexibility to move to prepare your strokes as you will find yourself trying to balance a lot more often.

2) Backhand: You need to straighten out your left arm for your backhand throughout the whole stroke

3) Groundstroke: You need to imagine you are pushing off the ground and shift your weight forward on every shot (of course i'm not saying you should push forward all the way but the initial push help a long way)

4) Forehand stands: You need to have your left foot standing further left, you are having your legs too close to each other when you hit the stroke.

5) Forehand contact: If you are using strong eastern grip, you need to make sure your right arm extend as much as you can on contact and make sure your right shoulder is in front of your left shoulder on contact as well

6) Be more smooth, all of your groundstroke has uncertainty writing all over your body movement, a good groundstroke swing is a continuous, fearless action, if you stop at any point in your swing, your form/power will not be good.
 
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Nellie

Hall of Fame
#28
Could you give some quick pointers on how to generate more topsin?
On your forehand, get the racquet head below the below prior to contact and finish high so the racquet head is travelling up at contact (not trying to force topspin from rolling your wrist over the ball). Another way to think of the stroke is that if your stroke is a "U" shape, the bottom section should happen before contact with the ball. The contact should not occur at the lowest point in the stroke. To practice, hit high, looping forehand that go way over the net, like a topspin lob, to force brushing up the back of the ball and swinging up through the ball for height.

You also need to practice swinging up at and through the ball on your serves to get some spin (try to get a lot of spin with mostly brushing through the ball and little contact and then price for a desired combination of speed and spin).
 
#30
Just my 2 cents, I'm not an expert but I do have some suggestions for you.

I also resumed playing tennis after a long hiatus from HS (tbh I wasn't serious playing tennis back then, I had no idea what I was doing). After a year of playing, I would say I am definitely in your shoes as I have went through the same exact progression and I have feedback that I think I can help you to improve your groundstroke a lot better.

But keep in mind that tennis is not a state, it is a process, that means you cannot rush it as your body and brain just can't grasp all the advanced concept all at once, you need to work it out one part at a time. So regular shadow swing, take mental notes and practice specific strokes is very important to get better. (also find different people to hit with helps a lot, esp people better than you)

1) Preparation: I keep hearing people say split steps, in my mind, that means nothing at this level, at your level what you want to think about is, how can I be early to prepare my stroke? And how do I do it?

Based on the video, I would say imagine you are predicting where your hitting partner is going to hit to, either left or right, how would you position your feet and your body so that you are prepared to go either left or right quickly?

The answer is, make a triangle! If your feet is wide open, it is a lot easier to move around and be stable at the same time. If you keep your legs closed, you will just not have that flexibility to move to prepare your strokes as you will find yourself trying to balance a lot more often.

2) Backhand: You need to straighten out your left arm for your backhand throughout the whole stroke

3) Groundstroke: You need to imagine you are pushing off the ground and shift your weight forward on every shot (of course i'm not saying you should push forward all the way but the initial push help a long way)

4) Forehand stands: You need to have your left foot standing further left, you are having your legs too close to each other when you hit the stroke.

5) Forehand contact: If you are using strong eastern grip, you need to make sure your right arm extend as much as you can on contact and make sure your right shoulder is in front of your left shoulder on contact as well

6) Be more smooth, all of your groundstroke has uncertainty writing all over your body movement, a good groundstroke swing is a continuous, fearless action, if you stop at any point in your swing, your form/power will not be good.
“2) Backhand: You need to straighten out your left arm for your backhand throughout the whole stroke”

No ... in backswing on 2hbh his left arm (off arm) will be bent. At contact, left arm can be bent or straight.

Following is good article on 2hbh arm positions... I ended up preferring bent/straight.

https://www.tennisplayer.net/public..._complex/Copy of 2hd_bh_simplest_complex.html
 
#31
So you never had any coaching?

You did an amazing job then, you really understand mechanics and know how to implement them to your own strokes from analyzing videos.
 
#32
Wow thanks for such kind words. I’ve been consistently hitting over the year and I’ve watched tons of videos of course. I turned 17 today and no I wouldn’t say I’ve had many strong partners. More or less I almost exclusively hit with my friend in the video. I think my friends strokes are pretty clean as well and his backhand is much better. Consistency is definitely a problem for the both of us as seen in some of these ridiculous misses.
I watched you points play video ... good job ... both of you. Is your friend also at one year? If so, he is also way ahead of schedule. He is hitting good control topspin from both sides, and hit some good shots in your points. His shot at 8:33 was FUGLY :p, but show good control/touch.

I think you can get your head with too many things, and mainly just keep doing what you are doing. Play a lot ... best tip you will ever get. I will give you one tip ... seems to be one I still have to give myself FOREVER.

Always strive to have your unit turn (talking torso/shoulders ... not necessarily arms) turned back by bounce. You will hear a lot of different advice on "when to be turned by" ... but at a minimum the "by the bounce". You aren't rushed at this point when you aren't turned by the bounce because of the pace of ball you are both hitting here, but it is a habit that will serve you well as you progress and face more pace.

Here is an example with your 2hbh. The first pic is "at the bounce", and the second pic is the unit turn you should be at already by that bounce on your side of the court. FYI ... on the 2hbh ... turning enough where your opponent can see at least some of your back is priceless when it comes to the 2hbh.



Here is an example on your FH where you are there by the bounce (good job). Second pic is your racquet lag before contact ... really nice. Again ... I continue to hate you. 8-B



Note: I am going to use your pics in my next reply to @pencilcheck ... you hit a bent/straight 2hbh. Good choice ... and that is what I ended up with.

EDIT: I lied ... have another tip. I have been converting to 2hbh for last three years, so all of this lives in my head ... can't get it out. :eek:

You will hear the phrase "hit with good extension" thrown about. It seems to be a term hard to define, but the following three pics is what it means to me on the 2hbh. In your 2hbh below, you break off quick after contact with a horizontal follow through. Nothing wrong with that ... we have a lot of different follow throughs with 2hbh depending on the shot we are trying to pull off. But I have a tendency to break off quick on my 2hbh, and have found with the simple 2hbh swing thought of reach toward target more with left arm ... I hit more solid 2hbhs.

Check out Djoker's left arm in follow through ... that is a pretty common position for the pros to end up in with their 2hbhs.

 
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#33
Just my 2 cents, I'm not an expert but I do have some suggestions for you.

I also resumed playing tennis after a long hiatus from HS (tbh I wasn't serious playing tennis back then, I had no idea what I was doing). After a year of playing, I would say I am definitely in your shoes as I have went through the same exact progression and I have feedback that I think I can help you to improve your groundstroke a lot better.

But keep in mind that tennis is not a state, it is a process, that means you cannot rush it as your body and brain just can't grasp all the advanced concept all at once, you need to work it out one part at a time. So regular shadow swing, take mental notes and practice specific strokes is very important to get better. (also find different people to hit with helps a lot, esp people better than you)

1) Preparation: I keep hearing people say split steps, in my mind, that means nothing at this level, at your level what you want to think about is, how can I be early to prepare my stroke? And how do I do it?

Based on the video, I would say imagine you are predicting where your hitting partner is going to hit to, either left or right, how would you position your feet and your body so that you are prepared to go either left or right quickly?

The answer is, make a triangle! If your feet is wide open, it is a lot easier to move around and be stable at the same time. If you keep your legs closed, you will just not have that flexibility to move to prepare your strokes as you will find yourself trying to balance a lot more often.

2) Backhand: You need to straighten out your left arm for your backhand throughout the whole stroke

3) Groundstroke: You need to imagine you are pushing off the ground and shift your weight forward on every shot (of course i'm not saying you should push forward all the way but the initial push help a long way)

4) Forehand stands: You need to have your left foot standing further left, you are having your legs too close to each other when you hit the stroke.

5) Forehand contact: If you are using strong eastern grip, you need to make sure your right arm extend as much as you can on contact and make sure your right shoulder is in front of your left shoulder on contact as well

6) Be more smooth, all of your groundstroke has uncertainty writing all over your body movement, a good groundstroke swing is a continuous, fearless action, if you stop at any point in your swing, your form/power will not be good.
FYI ... this is what I meant by 2hbh off arm (left arm in Cho's case) positions during the stroke.



It is pretty standard that the left (off) arm stays bent in back swing, and even in forward swing until the off arm fires (straightens). His left arm in pic #2 will be firing (active left arm effort) into contact. In his 2hbh, he ended up with a straight arm by contact. He hits a bent/straight 2hbh ... term based on arm position at contact. Bent right arm, straight left. Djokovic hits bent/straight .... Agassi hit straight/straight. Actually, angle isn't the best, if Christopher right arm is straight above at contact, then he hits straight/straight.

This is probably what you meant by straight left arm in the stroke. I would always suggest straight off arm at contact for 2hbhs for those starting out with the stroke. That said, bent off arm at contact is a valid 2hbh ... most of the WTA plays bent/bent (Venus as an example), and many ATP pros have used it.

All just fyi ... cheers.
 
#34
“2) Backhand: You need to straighten out your left arm for your backhand throughout the whole stroke”

No ... in backswing on 2hbh his left arm (off arm) will be bent. At contact, left arm can be bent or straight.

Following is good article on 2hbh arm positions... I ended up preferring bent/straight.

https://www.tennisplayer.net/public/avancedtennis/two_handed_backhand/2hd_bh_simplest_complex/Copy of 2hd_bh_simplest_complex.html
When I mean straight, I mean you "feel" your arm is extending to the comfortable extreme, your appearance might not be completely straight and that's ok.

Djoker hits straight throughout the stroke and I am inspired to hit like that straight arm throughout as well.
It helps a lot in consistency and power.
In my opinion, benting is a lot more complicated and might not always give you consistent response.

But I do agree that you don't need to be straight all the way, at preparation it really depends on player's preference however on contact, most pros that hit really good backhand seems to have their non-dominant arm straighten out on contact:
David Nalbandian:
Kei Nishikori:

I prefer straighten out my non-dominant arm throughout the swingpath (of course when it touches my body near the end of the stroke, it will bend due to body machanics)
 
#35
When I mean straight, I mean you "feel" your arm is extending to the comfortable extreme, your appearance might not be completely straight and that's ok.

Djoker hits straight throughout the stroke and I am inspired to hit like that straight arm throughout as well.
It helps a lot in consistency and power.
In my opinion, benting is a lot more complicated and might not always give you consistent response.

But I do agree that you don't need to be straight all the way, at preparation it really depends on player's preference however on contact, most pros that hit really good backhand seems to have their non-dominant arm straighten out on contact:
David Nalbandian:
Kei Nishikori:

I prefer straighten out my non-dominant arm throughout the swingpath (of course when it touches my body near the end of the stroke, it will bend due to body machanics)
"When I mean straight, I mean you "feel" your arm is extending to the comfortable extreme, your appearance might not be completely straight and that's ok. "

Got it ... you meant in the forward swing. With bent/straight (Djoker) goes back right arm straight, left arm bent/flexed, and then by contact it reverses ... right arm bent, left arm straight.

I young Christopher thinks about all of this, he will never make contact. :p

What I wouldn't give for Nalbandian's 2hbh.
 
#36
Just my 2 cents, I'm not an expert but I do have some suggestions for you.

I also resumed playing tennis after a long hiatus from HS (tbh I wasn't serious playing tennis back then, I had no idea what I was doing). After a year of playing, I would say I am definitely in your shoes as I have went through the same exact progression and I have feedback that I think I can help you to improve your groundstroke a lot better.

But keep in mind that tennis is not a state, it is a process, that means you cannot rush it as your body and brain just can't grasp all the advanced concept all at once, you need to work it out one part at a time. So regular shadow swing, take mental notes and practice specific strokes is very important to get better. (also find different people to hit with helps a lot, esp people better than you)

1) Preparation: I keep hearing people say split steps, in my mind, that means nothing at this level, at your level what you want to think about is, how can I be early to prepare my stroke? And how do I do it?

Based on the video, I would say imagine you are predicting where your hitting partner is going to hit to, either left or right, how would you position your feet and your body so that you are prepared to go either left or right quickly?

The answer is, make a triangle! If your feet is wide open, it is a lot easier to move around and be stable at the same time. If you keep your legs closed, you will just not have that flexibility to move to prepare your strokes as you will find yourself trying to balance a lot more often.

2) Backhand: You need to straighten out your left arm for your backhand throughout the whole stroke

3) Groundstroke: You need to imagine you are pushing off the ground and shift your weight forward on every shot (of course i'm not saying you should push forward all the way but the initial push help a long way)

4) Forehand stands: You need to have your left foot standing further left, you are having your legs too close to each other when you hit the stroke.

5) Forehand contact: If you are using strong eastern grip, you need to make sure your right arm extend as much as you can on contact and make sure your right shoulder is in front of your left shoulder on contact as well

6) Be more smooth, all of your groundstroke has uncertainty writing all over your body movement, a good groundstroke swing is a continuous, fearless action, if you stop at any point in your swing, your form/power will not be good.
Wow this was some amazing advice. Thank you!
 
#38
I watched you points play video ... good job ... both of you. Is your friend also at one year? If so, he is also way ahead of schedule. He is hitting good control topspin from both sides, and hit some good shots in your points. His shot at 8:33 was FUGLY :p, but show good control/touch.

I think you can get your head with too many things, and mainly just keep doing what you are doing. Play a lot ... best tip you will ever get. I will give you one tip ... seems to be one I still have to give myself FOREVER.

Always strive to have your unit turn (talking torso/shoulders ... not necessarily arms) turned back by bounce. You will hear a lot of different advice on "when to be turned by" ... but at a minimum the "by the bounce". You aren't rushed at this point when you aren't turned by the bounce because of the pace of ball you are both hitting here, but it is a habit that will serve you well as you progress and face more pace.

Here is an example with your 2hbh. The first pic is "at the bounce", and the second pic is the unit turn you should be at already by that bounce on your side of the court. FYI ... on the 2hbh ... turning enough where your opponent can see at least some of your back is priceless when it comes to the 2hbh.



Here is an example on your FH where you are there by the bounce (good job). Second pic is your racquet lag before contact ... really nice. Again ... I continue to hate you. 8-B



Note: I am going to use your pics in my next reply to @pencilcheck ... you hit a bent/straight 2hbh. Good choice ... and that is what I ended up with.

EDIT: I lied ... have another tip. I have been converting to 2hbh for last three years, so all of this lives in my head ... can't get it out. :eek:

You will hear the phrase "hit with good extension" thrown about. It seems to be a term hard to define, but the following three pics is what it means to me on the 2hbh. In your 2hbh below, you break off quick after contact with a horizontal follow through. Nothing wrong with that ... we have a lot of different follow throughs with 2hbh depending on the shot we are trying to pull off. But I have a tendency to break off quick on my 2hbh, and have found with the simple 2hbh swing thought of reach toward target more with left arm ... I hit more solid 2hbhs.

Check out Djoker's left arm in follow through ... that is a pretty common position for the pros to end up in with their 2hbhs.

I’ll make sure to think about this on my backhand thank you!
 
#39
"When I mean straight, I mean you "feel" your arm is extending to the comfortable extreme, your appearance might not be completely straight and that's ok. "

Got it ... you meant in the forward swing. With bent/straight (Djoker) goes back right arm straight, left arm bent/flexed, and then by contact it reverses ... right arm bent, left arm straight.

I young Christopher thinks about all of this, he will never make contact. :p

What I wouldn't give for Nalbandian's 2hbh.
To be honest, it is not that hard and you don't need to think about it.
All that is in your mind is, keep your left arm straight, don't even need to think about your right arm (As a righty), and the only other thing is to watch the ball and move to the right accordingly. Of course, the usual body rotation and weight shifting, all of those are fundamentals, I believe Christopher has already mastered it in his strokes so I'm not that worried.

That's all I think about when I swing, I give more description because this is not about actual swing mindset but more of a technique/form discussion.
 
#40
Just my 2 cents, I'm not an expert but I do have some suggestions for you.

I also resumed playing tennis after a long hiatus from HS (tbh I wasn't serious playing tennis back then, I had no idea what I was doing). After a year of playing, I would say I am definitely in your shoes as I have went through the same exact progression and I have feedback that I think I can help you to improve your groundstroke a lot better.

But keep in mind that tennis is not a state, it is a process, that means you cannot rush it as your body and brain just can't grasp all the advanced concept all at once, you need to work it out one part at a time. So regular shadow swing, take mental notes and practice specific strokes is very important to get better. (also find different people to hit with helps a lot, esp people better than you)

1) Preparation: I keep hearing people say split steps, in my mind, that means nothing at this level, at your level what you want to think about is, how can I be early to prepare my stroke? And how do I do it?

Based on the video, I would say imagine you are predicting where your hitting partner is going to hit to, either left or right, how would you position your feet and your body so that you are prepared to go either left or right quickly?

The answer is, make a triangle! If your feet is wide open, it is a lot easier to move around and be stable at the same time. If you keep your legs closed, you will just not have that flexibility to move to prepare your strokes as you will find yourself trying to balance a lot more often.

2) Backhand: You need to straighten out your left arm for your backhand throughout the whole stroke

3) Groundstroke: You need to imagine you are pushing off the ground and shift your weight forward on every shot (of course i'm not saying you should push forward all the way but the initial push help a long way)

4) Forehand stands: You need to have your left foot standing further left, you are having your legs too close to each other when you hit the stroke.

5) Forehand contact: If you are using strong eastern grip, you need to make sure your right arm extend as much as you can on contact and make sure your right shoulder is in front of your left shoulder on contact as well

6) Be more smooth, all of your groundstroke has uncertainty writing all over your body movement, a good groundstroke swing is a continuous, fearless action, if you stop at any point in your swing, your form/power will not be good.
5) Forehand contact: If you are using strong eastern grip, you need to make sure your right arm extend as much as you can on contact and make sure your right shoulder is in front of your left shoulder on contact as well

I have read about a billion words here about FHs ... and never heard that one. A quick check of max rhs FHs of Fed, Nadal, Djokovic and Wawrinka (different grips and Djoker bent arm fh at contact) for the most part right shoulder ahead of left at contact. That will give ttw something else to obsess over on the fh ....hehehe.
 
#41
I suggest trying to hit 100 balls in a row each, for a total of 200 shots in a rally as your first milestone. Try to get the ball to land dead in the middle of the court, right on the T, and don't let it bounce more than once before you hit it. Very very important.
 
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