please help...looking for the absolute most comfortable racquet that exists

roundiesee

Hall of Fame
ratm355, I was just wondering if you have tried the Head Twin Tube rackets, like the prestige series, MG prestige, Head Andre Agassi limited edition series; any of those suitable for your problems? Thanks!
 

origmarm

Hall of Fame
For what it's worth my brother broke his right wrist on a snowboard 3yrs ago, he's never been quite the same and he plays with a Redondo. Use to play a Bab PD and just can't now.
 

ratm355

Rookie
I've played with the discontinued Head Satellite Tour and the Microgel Radical Pro. I didn't really give either of those rackets a fair shot because I was already mildly injured when I hit with them. I would say both of those were quite comfortable rackets with the Radical Pro playing quite a bit stiffer than the Satellite. I liked them both and may end up playing with one of those or one like it after I do some strength conditioning. I played with the Microgel Prestige Pro briefly, but it didn't seem as comfortable as the Radical. The problem I've found is that with a lot of the newer rackets, I have to string them tight or use a polyester hybrid to get the control I want...both of which make it harder on the arm. I may end up going for something more old school like a Redondo, Donnay Pro One International, or Avery M3 Control and stringing with natural gut. I still haven't tried any of those rackets yet (only similar ones) or natural gut...I was planning on trying natural gut next until the recent injuries.

I don't think technique is as much as problem as it used to be for me...I've adjusted my strokes and serve quite a bit since the original injuries. Both the shoulder and right wrist bother me doing normal activities outside of tennis too and audibly pop and crunch when I move them a certain way...all the more reason to do some strength conditioning. I think I might have been wrong when I said high forehands are what bothers my wrist because I'll hit lots of high forehands without any problems and then one ball will come in heavy and I'll return it hard (probably with an off-center hit) and that's when I get the first sign of pain. After that, it's all downhill and I probably noticed it more on high forehands. I already take groundstrokes early on both sides when I can and I'm sure it helps. I'll talk to a coach about it though because you still might be right about the wrist. I know my serve has good technique now. When I injured it hitting a serve years ago, I had pretty poor technique, was playing in the cold, went all out on the first serve of the day, and the racket was strung at 75 lbs in an 18x20 string pattern with synthetic gut (that's not what I requested, but it's what ended up being done). I heard a pop and couldn't lift my arm laterally for the next few days after that. I've never seen a doctor about it or done physical therapy so hopefully that problem will be fixed doing both of those things...even now though it isn't too bad as long as it's thoroughly warmed up before I go after the serves. The recent left wrist injury does confuse me a bit because I do have real good technique on the backhand and have never had a problem with it in the past. I think I must have worn it down some doing a lot of yardwork, housework, and lifting things with my wrist turned and then the tennis may have just been the last straw.

I definitely agree with you about the technique and physical condition. Before I adjusted my strokes and serve, there just wasn't a chance of staying healthy. The physical conditioning will be the obvious next step and I'll consult a coach to be sure on the technique. I already have an appointment scheduled with the orthopedist so I'll ask him about the shoulder in addition to the knee. Maybe I'm just borderline with some of my injuries, but I noticed a huge difference in comfort between some rackets so I'd say it's definitely worthwhile to do all three things: improve technique, improve physical condition, and get an arm-friendly racket and strings...might as well go all out as a preventative measure. After all, we only get older.
 

ratm355

Rookie
Well, I tried out some wrist exercises on my right wrist (the one not in a brace) just to see how it would do. I can't even do a "wrist flexion" strengthening exercise using a dumbbell with no weight on it...the bar probably only weighs around a pound or less. Here is what I'm talking about...

http://rehabworks.ksc.nasa.gov/education/protocols/basicwristelbow.php

it's called wrist flexion on that page. I never have been able to lift much with my right wrist turned since it was fractured a long time ago, but I don't know how I can get it any better since I can't even lift a dumbell with no weight on it without my wrist crunching/popping and hurting the whole time I'm doing it. The wrist isn't flared up or anything...it's just like it always is as far as I can tell. The last time I asked the doctor about this, he said that my wrist was stable and there wasn't anything that could be done. I guess I should get a second opinion....???....???
 

matchmaker

Hall of Fame
One more thing to think about...you might try one of those worm vibe dampeners. They make the strangest feel, like dead and no feel. It might help your wrist. I don't have an arm problem, but have found I really like the weird feel and dull sound.
I did the comparative test and those worm vibe dampeners don't do a thing. The simple O dampener is the best and even a simple rubber band knot around the two central strings takes all vibration away. I tested it and there is no doubt about it for me. The worm dampener is just a useless gizmo, it does not filter out the vibration.
 
As someone mentioned, you should listen to those who have been there. I have bad joints due to immunosuppressant meds I take. Generally, heavier, flexible rackets are great for the elbow. But, as I mentioned before, too heavy can tear up your shoulder. One of my favorite rackets of all time is the Pro Kennex Ceramic Destiny. It had good flex, good feel and was truly solid. Unfortunately, it weighed over 13 oz strung. It took approx 2 weeks before my shoulder felt as if it were coming out of socket every time I served. I'm using an older version of the 5g now. It's been modified some, and weighs around 12 oz strung, which is a good weight for what I like. Is it the best? Well, I probably played better with the Cer. Destiny. But, it was the best compromise I could make.
 

robby c

Semi-Pro
I have 4 Head Satellites that I returned to after elbow pain set in. I've been missing my old POG for the rounder handle shape. Let me know if you're in the market for Satellites. I've had elbow pain this year because I tried to switch to ncode Prostaff Tour 90's after a 10 year layoff. Dumb,dumb,dumb.
Good luck.
Robby C
 

ratm355

Rookie
Well, I'm headed on the right track now. I just kept doing the exercises on right wrist working through the pain and it's finally healed up and I'm not having any problems anymore. I've been to the doctor with everything else. Apparently I have a shoulder impingement which is what's causing the shoulder problems. The left wrist was a strained tendon. The knee problem is from the ACL surgery when they cut on the patella tendon. So far it hasn't helped on the shoulder and I'm going back in tomorrow and will be starting PT on the knee then too. The doctor recommended physical therapy for all of the above. The wrist/elbow strengthening is something I would recommend to any serious tennis player or those who just have to play with poly or kevlar strings. As far as comfortable rackets go, the two current rackets that I would recommend would be the Pro Kennex Type C Redondo 98 if you're looking for control and the Head Microgel Radical OS if you're looking for power. I'd like to try the Boris Becker 11 Mid someday, but it looked like it might be tougher on the shoulder than the other two. Natural gut is definitely the way to go....well worth the $$$. I've found that I like a hybrid of natural gut on the mains and Laserfibre LaserTour on the crosses. I'm selling all the rackets that I've bought and ended up not sticking with. There are some extremely arm friendly sticks on the list. I posted them on the forums at
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=221516 . Thanks to everybody who helped!
 

gonzalocatalino

Hall of Fame
I like to play with racquets with a midplus headsize, open string pattern, head-light balance, flexible frame, control-oriented, and a long enough handle for a 2-handed backhand
Try the Prince graphite longbody!
 

shell

Professional
Well, I'm headed on the right track now. I just kept doing the exercises on right wrist working through the pain and it's finally healed up and I'm not having any problems anymore. I've been to the doctor with everything else. Apparently I have a shoulder impingement which is what's causing the shoulder problems. The left wrist was a strained tendon. The knee problem is from the ACL surgery when they cut on the patella tendon. So far it hasn't helped on the shoulder and I'm going back in tomorrow and will be starting PT on the knee then too. The doctor recommended physical therapy for all of the above. The wrist/elbow strengthening is something I would recommend to any serious tennis player or those who just have to play with poly or kevlar strings. As far as comfortable rackets go, the two current rackets that I would recommend would be the Pro Kennex Type C Redondo 98 if you're looking for control and the Head Microgel Radical OS if you're looking for power. I'd like to try the Boris Becker 11 Mid someday, but it looked like it might be tougher on the shoulder than the other two. Natural gut is definitely the way to go....well worth the $$$. I've found that I like a hybrid of natural gut on the mains and Laserfibre LaserTour on the crosses. I'm selling all the rackets that I've bought and ended up not sticking with. There are some extremely arm friendly sticks on the list. I posted them on the forums at
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=221516 . Thanks to everybody who helped!
Good to hear that things are finally on the mend. That was a tough list of injuries!
 

ratm355

Rookie
and that's not even counting the injuries that I've already successfully recovered from :)

It's not quite as bad as it sounds though...I had just neglected going to the doctor for so long (and I went to a new orthopedist who was much more helpful)...so not all those injuries happened at once. That's pretty much just the sum of injuries over the last 6 years that I hadn't taken care of when it first happened. I'm convinced that the recent left wrist injury was partially from trying all these different rackets which resulted in a fair amount of mishit balls since I wasn't used to any of the rackets I was trying. Also, I was playing with a POG OS strung with synthetic gut at 62 lbs when it started which isn't very arm friendly to begin with mainly because of the strings, and the new tour version of the POG is actually fairly stiff and has some high frequency vibrations without the Babolat RVS dampener. I had been pushing it too hard doing yardwork too.

I'm glad too and I'll be ready for some local tournaments next year 8)
 

amx13

Semi-Pro
I use to have tennis elbow, but after testing a lot of frames last year, like the Babolat APDC, Volkl DNX 10, Dunlop AG 200, Head Radical Pro, Yonex RDS 001, Pro Kennex Ki 5G, Wilson nBlade and some others I cant remeber right now, I found that the most comfortable racquet for me is the Head Pro Tour 280. I can even put luxilon strings on them and still play pain-free.
 
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shell

Professional
and that's not even counting the injuries that I've already successfully recovered from :)

It's not quite as bad as it sounds though...I had just neglected going to the doctor for so long (and I went to a new orthopedist who was much more helpful)...so not all those injuries happened at once. That's pretty much just the sum of injuries over the last 6 years that I hadn't taken care of when it first happened. I'm convinced that the recent left wrist injury was partially from trying all these different rackets which resulted in a fair amount of mishit balls since I wasn't used to any of the rackets I was trying. Also, I was playing with a POG OS strung with synthetic gut at 62 lbs when it started which isn't very arm friendly to begin with mainly because of the strings, and the new tour version of the POG is actually fairly stiff and has some high frequency vibrations without the Babolat RVS dampener. I had been pushing it too hard doing yardwork too.

I'm glad too and I'll be ready for some local tournaments next year 8)
Well there is your problem....abandon the yard work!! It is bad for your tennis! :)
 

danix

Semi-Pro
C10 Pro 98 with gut, low tension. If you can find one, the older Catapult 10 might be interesting too.
 

Revman

Rookie
The most comfortable and arm-friendly racquets I ever played with (and I've played with hundreds) were the Dunlop Revelation Tour Pro (maroon and black), Dunlop Select Pro (gold), and Dunlop Classic Pro (Blue). The Tour Pro turns up with some regularity on the auction site, while the other two are a bit harder to find. The Classic Pro is the softest of the three. Hitting with it was like hitting with a pillow. All three had the "ISIS" system in the handle.
 

plasma

Banned
I THINK that anything made in the last 10 years will be way too stiff for u, I am a vintage rackaholic, though. These are some famous yet great mushy sticks for you, sorry, but i think the racks you listed are stiff as hell and not that great.
dunlop 200g
rossignol f200
pro kennex (never actually touched one, but they are famous for being soft)
fischer
Jack Kramer staff mid
in fact, even frames from that era which are regarded as stiff are much more flexible and soft than todays sticks. Oh I almost forgot...Donnay wst cobalt and pro one are as soft as a babies hiney!
pls let us know what you everntually chose....good luck, comfy hitting!
 

ratm355

Rookie
believe it or not, I still haven't settled on a racket. I've got a cold right now, but I'm plan on picking a racket over the winter and getting used to it by the time summer rolls around. I'll make a post when I decide on one. I've definitely decided on strings though....NATURAL GUT :)
 

Mick

Legend
the problem is what is a comfortable racquet to one person may not be a comfortable racquet to the next person.

you can look at the choices of other people but you have to try them out.
 

ratm355

Rookie
Well, I finally settled on the Max 200G. I'd say I could play with most rackets strung with natural gut now though. Physical therapy is really what helped me the most. I'm selling all the rackets I tried and didn't end up sticking with. Several of them are already strung with natural gut. Here's a link to them...there's some really nice arm friendly rackets there:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=238382


THANKS TO ALL WHO POSTED!
 

yemenmocha

Professional
You try many of the multifilament strings on the market? I've found they're very comparable if not better than gut. I love Gamma Professional.
 

ratm355

Rookie
Yeah, I liked Gamma Professional, Tecnifibre E-Matrix, and Golden Set Maximal. All very playable synthetics. None of them hold their tension well and play looser each time. They also put a lot more stress on rackets during stringing due to all the prestretching which can cause the rackets to deform/compress a little. I like natural gut because it plays even better than those, more durable, and holds tension much better. Well worth the extra $$.
 

harryz

Professional
Gamma G325

very close to C10 and 200G MW. Soft with great feel, box beam and HL balance. Sweet stick. Let me know if you're interested in any...
 

goosala

Hall of Fame
Yes, the Gamma G325 is a nice player's frame. The feel and balance is right on. I like it much better than the old PS Classic 6.1 which was too powerful and headlight.
 

harryz

Professional
G325

So many posters love the PS 6.0 95 and the G325 is a better stick for me with superior frame to frame consistency. Lord knows I wanted to like the PS and have owned more than a few. G325 pattern is good for spin, it has a thin box beam, nice feel and unpretentious technology. Just a solid stick with great control and good pop. BUT it's a Gamma, with no pro endorsements. Oh well. Seems that's where we are these days.
 
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