please tell me , how the hell robin soderling beat nadal in 2009 RG R16 ?

Many people have come up with an answer that contains part of the truth, but I'm not sure anyone has yet got the whole truth, because they have tended to minimize it. The answer is "Nadal was injured." But the true answer is, "Nadal was extremely severely injured." The answer as given just states a fact of life, something that is true all the time, and that has not stopped Nadal winning the rest of the time.

And yet even my first paragraph does not quite get to the root of the matter, because it accepts the premise implicit in the question; namely, that Soderling did in fact beat Nadal. But this is simply not true. It might appear to be true in the phenomenal realm (the realm of appearances) but in the higher realm of morality (the realm of essences) Nadal was as triumphant on that day as on every other.
 

E36BMWM3

Hall of Fame
He demolished his second serve and blew him off the court with power and weight. The guy hit 65 winners in four sets against arguably the best defender ever on clay, not many players have such skillset.
Well he only maximized that “skillset” on this one match... gave it his all against Rafa and redlined like never before and never again all at once. Where’s Soderling now? :unsure:
 

14OuncesStrung

Semi-Pro
Nadal's knees were screwed from winning AO. And at the time his parents were going through a messy divorce.
So that affected him a lot.
 

King No1e

G.O.A.T.
Funny enough, Soderling himself said he likes the win over Federer more.
The Federer win was arguably more impressive. In 09 Robin played out of his mind for that one match, like an underdog with nothing to lose. In 10, he seemed much more controlled, complete, and confident in how he dismantled Fed. He played that match like a top player expecting to win. If only he had stuck around longer, he could've been the 5th member of the otherwise Big 4.
 

Martin J

Professional
Well he only maximized that “skillset” on this one match... gave it his all against Rafa and redlined like never before and never again all at once. Where’s Soderling now? :unsure:
Yeah but how many players managed to achieve that? "Redlining" against Nadal at RG and actually winning the match, that's a massive feat and Sod deserves all the credits. It's one thing to play the same way in BO3, like Gulbis did on two occasions (still lost anyway), but to be able to do maintain the level and not fold under the pressure against Nadal on Chatrier requires both skillset and mental strength.
Of course, Nadal didn't make the same mistake in the later matches and made some adjustments and he is a much better player overall, but it still takes something special to beat him there.
 

DIMI_D

Semi-Pro


I TRULY belive if nadal got away with this match , roger federer never got RG in his life
anyway what i wonder is how the hell this swedish guy beat rafa in 2009 french open ??

agianst rafa in RG is
Apart from the almost impossible physical challenge to be the agressor all the time, also think of it mentally.

There is nothing more frustrating than to play against Nadal, whose heavy topspin makes you look bad. If you attack with the mentality of winning the point right away, you are toast. Nadal loves this situations. You have to work out every point, prepare your head for multiple shots to follow, no matter how good your position on court is. Add to this the nasty psychological moves and deliberate time delays from Nadal we all know too well, and I actually think not losing your head against the Spaniard is the biggest challenge of it all.









I'll never forget how Söderling managed to be that calm. Him hiding his head under his towel, never losing focus, just tearing Nadal apart shot after shot. Oh how beautiful that day was, a shining beacon in the darkness that is Nadal on clay. It was a match for eternity, everybody will remember this one till the end of time.
Because Sky wasn’t there to help poor Nadal
 

NoleIsBoat

Hall of Fame
- Nadal wasn’t 100% sharp. Had a gruelling clay season to that point and was carrying an injury
- Soderling was hammering the ball and landing it close to the lines from both sides. He maintained this for 4 sets.
 

Wander

Hall of Fame
If only he had stuck around longer, he could've been the 5th member of the otherwise Big 4.
I don't know about that but without the mono ending his career he could've perhaps achieved something similar to Stan. He was only 27 and winning tournaments when he was forced to stop.
 

CHillTennis

Semi-Pro
I don't know about that but without the mono ending his career he could've perhaps achieved something similar to Stan. He was only 27 and winning tournaments when he was forced to stop.
He definitely would have had some more opportunities.

But it would have been a rough few years, given how strong the Big 4 were at the slams.

Soderling wasn't able to win a set in either of his two grand slam finals.

Andy Murray also had similar problems during the early stages of his career (losing his first three grand slam finals in straight sets).

Over-time, though, he was able to figure out exactly what he needed to do in order to win.

This turning point came at the 2012 US Open. Andy's fifth grand slam final appearance.

In the case with Soderling, he very likely would have needed a couple more grand slam finals, before he would have been ready to win the big one.
 
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TennisFan3

G.O.A.T.

Nadal didn't play his best. Söderling did.
This is by far the most EMOTIONAL I've ever seen Nadal in a post match presser.
He is about to cry - like 4 times in that interview.
The Soderling loss really really very deeply shocked him. For sure, the BIGGEST loss in his career.

Which is why I think the subsequent F.O 2010 Final vs Soderling might also be one of his most satisfying triumphs.
 

The Blond Blur

Hall of Fame
After 12 years and you plus the vamos brigade are still butthurt about the loss.

Fact is Soderling was the better player and he beat Nadal convincingly. Deal with it !
This coming from the same person who's still butthurt about the 2008 AO loss to Joker :rolleyes:
 

NoleIsBoat

Hall of Fame
Roger Federer faced the toughest challenge that no ATG ever faced,

He had not 1 but 2 ATGs in his immediate next generation which prevented him from winning anything in his 30s as those 2 were at their peak in their 20s.

One of those ATGs was a teenage prodigy too.

No champion has to battle in such tough circumstances.
How many ATG did maestro defeat to win his first 12 slams between 03-07?
Now how many ATG did Djokovic defeat to win his first 12 slams from 08-16

:whistle:
 

Krish872007

G.O.A.T.
Quite frankly, with every passing year that Rafa wins this tournament Soderling's performance seems all the more extraordinary in hindsight. Even when he's played sub-par he's still been able to pull out several victories so to score a win over him at RG still requires enormous effort.

A lot of players have had hot streaks in the middle of matches - most have lasted a few games, some have even lasted for a set or a set and a half. But to be able to hit consistently big like that for 4 full sets was remarkable.
 

Druss

Hall of Fame
How many ATG did maestro defeat to win his first 12 slams between 03-07?
Now how many ATG did Djokovic defeat to win his first 12 slams from 08-16

:whistle:
For Fedr it’s 6 times.

Then again, just because one is an ATG, doesn’t mean that he is always going to be a tougher opponent than anyone else. Do you really think that Djoker or Fedr at RG F 2020/2008 played better than Roddick at Wimby F 2009?
 

merwy

G.O.A.T.
It seems such an anti-climax for Söderling that he couldn't carry over that epic win against Nadal into an equally epic win in the final (or win of any kind).

Talented as he was he just couldn't string big match wins together to land big titles (2010 Paris-Bercy is his sole big title).
Well you've got to put things in perspective. It was probably the toughest time period for anyone (outside of the Big 3) to win slams. He got a M1000 title and imo he played well enough to prove that those 2 RG finals weren't just flukes. The sad thing is obviously how his career ended. He was actually playing at an incredibly high level at the time. I remember he beat Ferrer 6-2 6-2 on clay in one of his last matches.
 

mike danny

Bionic Poster
For Fedr it’s 6 times.

Then again, just because one is an ATG, doesn’t mean that he is always going to be a tougher opponent than anyone else. Do you really think that Djoker or Fedr at RG F 2020/2008 played better than Roddick at Wimby F 2009?
Djoker in the USO finals of 2010/2013 sure as heck wasn't tougher than the Roddick of the 2004/2009 Wimb finals, for example.
 

mike danny

Bionic Poster
Well you've got to put things in perspective. It was probably the toughest time period for anyone (outside of the Big 3) to win slams. He got a M1000 title and imo he played well enough to prove that those 2 RG finals weren't just flukes. The sad thing is obviously how his career ended. He was actually playing at an incredibly high level at the time. I remember he beat Ferrer 6-2 6-2 on clay in one of his last matches.
Completely crushed Ferrer and Berdych to win his last ATP title before mono completely screwed him over.
 

Rovesciarete

Semi-Pro
The true question is how Rafa managed to lose so little…

Robin played the match of his life and the stars aligned…
 

StrongRule

G.O.A.T.
The Federer win was arguably more impressive. In 09 Robin played out of his mind for that one match, like an underdog with nothing to lose. In 10, he seemed much more controlled, complete, and confident in how he dismantled Fed. He played that match like a top player expecting to win. If only he had stuck around longer, he could've been the 5th member of the otherwise Big 4.
Don't know if more impressive, but it was also a big win. After all, it was the first time since RG 2004 when Federer lost before a slam semifinal.
 

King No1e

G.O.A.T.
Don't know if more impressive, but it was also a big win. After all, it was the first time since RG 2004 when Federer lost before a slam semifinal.
I just meant it was more impressive from Söderling's point of view. Obviously RG09 was one of the biggest upsets of all time.
 

mike danny

Bionic Poster
I just meant it was more impressive from Söderling's point of view. Obviously RG09 was one of the biggest upsets of all time.
It probably was a bigger win from Soderling's point of view because he had more history with Federer and he was by far his toughest opponent.
 

kishnabe

Talk Tennis Guru
Hitting Wide Serves, Smashing every ball, everything landing in. Akin to 5th set Rosol Nadal SW19 2012.

Nadal was 100% healthy and fit but he ruined his forehand. It was changed to make him perform better on HC. You can even see it in AO 2009.

He reverted back to his old forehand in 2010+.

That forehand was landing short on Clay Courts, even in the events he won.

Shame Nadal did not reach the final, Federer would have smashed him in Straights.
 

Nadalgaenger

G.O.A.T.
Hitting Wide Serves, Smashing every ball, everything landing in. Akin to 5th set Rosol Nadal SW19 2012.

Nadal was 100% healthy and fit but he ruined his forehand. It was changed to make him perform better on HC. You can even see it in AO 2009.

He reverted back to his old forehand in 2010+.

That forehand was landing short on Clay Courts, even in the events he won.

Shame Nadal did not reach the final, Federer would have smashed him in Straights.
Was Nadal’s FH “ruined” here?
 

joohan

Hall of Fame
Can't believe there's still no full video or even decent HD highlight of this match out there. Maybe Rafa bought it all...for posterity.
 

Enga

Hall of Fame
I think its because he was hitting the ball like, really hard. It reminds me of the time that Wawrinka hit the ball really hard.
 

lelopez

Semi-Pro
He demolished his second serve and blew him off the court with power and weight. The guy hit 65 winners in four sets against arguably the best defender ever on clay, not many players have such skillset.
All this while hitting a WTA forehand. Maybe that's the answer to beat him on clay.
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru
The Federer win was arguably more impressive. In 09 Robin played out of his mind for that one match, like an underdog with nothing to lose. In 10, he seemed much more controlled, complete, and confident in how he dismantled Fed. He played that match like a top player expecting to win. If only he had stuck around longer, he could've been the 5th member of the otherwise Big 4.
Yes, shame he didn't stay around longer.

 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
Soderling did something against Nadal that few other players have rarely done (including Federer and Djokovic).

Soderling got into Nadal's head to the point where it, along with several other factors, affected Nadal's game adversely.

Rafa has a huge advantage in that too many of his opponents (if not all of them) show him too much respect. He has always said that to him every tennis match is a problem looking for a solution. When he finds the solution, he usually wins the match. The thing is, most of the time, the problem he faces is either physical or technical. It is rarely a mental one brought about by his opponent.

I'm reminded of McEnroe. He used to carry on like a "pork chop". But most of his opponents respected his game too much and would not challenge him on that front. And few of his oppponents had the physical game to match him.

I just wish some of Nadal's opponents over the years had paid closer attention to what Soderling did to Nadal and tried to emulate it.

Things like ...

-At the start of the match, don't get up from the chair and go onto the court until he does first.
-Consistently point out to the Umpire that he is taking too long to serve.
-Don't wait for him to cross the net in front of you during the change-over.
-Wait for him to re-enter the court after a change-over before you re-enter the court.
-During media interviews, mention that you are working of different ways to play him. Otherwise, do not mention him at all. Simply talk about yourself.

Perhaps Soderlling went a little to far with Picking his shorts, or moving Nadal's drink bottles. But it certainly did get into Nadal's head.

Nadal's opponents should never be thinking about doing things to beat Nadal. They should be doing things to give themselves the best opportunity to get into positions to beat Nadal. That starts with the mental game.

I wish more of his opponents had attempted that over the journey.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
Irrelevant nonsense
Unfortunately for Federer, the moment that his Major Titles Count is exceeded either by Nadal or Djokovic or both of them, many people will go back and look at his Record. And many of them will conclude that the value of Rafa and Novak's Major Titles are probably greater because they were mostly obtained against Roger or each other. Roger obtained a significant proportion of his Major Titles against strong opponents for the most part but none were in the same league as Rafa or Novak.
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru
Soderling did something against Nadal that few other players have rarely done (including Federer and Djokovic).

Soderling got into Nadal's head to the point where it, along with several other factors, affected Nadal's game adversely.

Rafa has a huge advantage in that too many of his opponents (if not all of them) show him too much respect. He has always said that to him every tennis match is a problem looking for a solution. When he finds the solution, he usually wins the match. The thing is, most of the time, the problem he faces is either physical or technical. It is rarely a mental one brought about by his opponent.

I'm reminded of McEnroe. He used to carry on like a "pork chop". But most of his opponents respected his game too much and would not challenge him on that front. And few of his oppponents had the physical game to match him.

I just wish some of Nadal's opponents over the years had paid closer attention to what Soderling did to Nadal and tried to emulate it.

Things like ...

-At the start of the match, don't get up from the chair and go onto the court until he does first.
-Consistently point out to the Umpire that he is taking too long to serve.
-Don't wait for him to cross the net in front of you during the change-over.
-Wait for him to re-enter the court after a change-over before you re-enter the court.
-During media interviews, mention that you are working of different ways to play him. Otherwise, do not mention him at all. Simply talk about yourself.

Perhaps Soderlling went a little to far with Picking his shorts, or moving Nadal's drink bottles. But it certainly did get into Nadal's head.

Nadal's opponents should never be thinking about doing things to beat Nadal. They should be doing things to give themselves the best opportunity to get into positions to beat Nadal. That starts with the mental game.

I wish more of his opponents had attempted that over the journey.
What your suggest did not help Sod:

 

aldeayeah

Legend
Can't believe there's still no full video or even decent HD highlight of this match out there. Maybe Rafa bought it all...for posterity.

This channel has it all except for a bit of the 4th set that YouTube auto-identifies and deletes on sight.

If you're interested in the OP's question, watch this.

octo pls don't report it

(also if you still use eMule in the two-thousand and twenty-first year of our lord, you can find several HD versions there)
 
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aldeayeah

Legend
What your suggest did not help Sod:

To give some credit to Soderling, Nadal never played him again the same way after 2009.

After his 2009 injury, Rafa became more assertive/less passive from the baseline, giving up a bit of his prior infallibility in defense in order to dictate more, in what was an early sign of his evolution towards his more aggressive current game (and also a concession to the fact that he no longer was quite as fast as he used to be.)

Combined with his improvements on serve, this generally improved his results on hard court, allowing him easier victories in the early rounds, diminishing his vulnerability to attacking players, and helping him consistently reach the later stages of HC slams, culminating in his 2010 US Open victory.

So maybe we Rafans should be thankful to Soderling after all. I personally regret his early disappearance from the pro circuit; he was a strong, fearless player who brought something different to the table and was competitive on all surfaces.

(Even if he was kind of a jerk, especially when he was younger.)
 
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