Pole: what is your favourite herb?

Favourite herb?

  • Basil

    Votes: 3 15.8%
  • Coriander

    Votes: 3 15.8%
  • Parsley

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • Tarragon (obviously the correct answer)

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • Rosemary

    Votes: 3 15.8%
  • Dill

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • Chives

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • Thyme

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Mint

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • Oregano

    Votes: 4 21.1%

  • Total voters
    19

MurraysMetalHip

Professional
Herbs are quite important. They make otherwise bland foods (such as vegetables) a little bit more edible. Which one is your favourite?

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MurraysMetalHip

Professional
Tough choice!
Went w parsley as it can be used on so much.
Basil is great, mint too. All of them are great! Even dill is awesome. Got inspired making pasta salad w smoked salmon and dill tomorrow :D
I am thrilled to hear that I inspire you. :-D

I make a rather tasty harissa salmon recipe, and serve it with a dill, mint, lemon, honey and cranberry couscous. It is rather tasty, as already mentioned.
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
I am thrilled to hear that I inspire you. :-D

I make a rather tasty harissa salmon recipe, and serve it with a dill, mint, lemon, honey and cranberry couscous. It is rather tasty, as already mentioned.
Sounds delicious!
I make it w pasta, creme fraiche, smoked salmon, pepper, garlic and lots of fresh dill!

Here in Scandinavia dill is very common to use w seafood, all kinds of seafood.
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
Salmon and dill goes together like a cup of tea and dunked biscuits... ie. perfectly.
How about tarragon though? I love the smell and I like to have it in the garden, but I rarely use it as a stand alone herb. It’s nice on baked chicken legs (w some blue cheese under the skin) or in bernaise sauce of course. I also love the essential oil of it.
I can use it a lot in stocks and mixed w other spices, but alone as a spice it’s a bit overwhelming.
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
Like already mentioned, there cannot be a favourite herb, unless one has a strong preference towards only certain foods. There are classical pairings that cannot be beaten with almost every single one of those herbs.

Here are some of them:

Basil and tomatoes.
Dill and salmon
Potatoes and rosemary
Lamb and mint
Tarragon and Hollandaise
Parsley and white wine or in a salsa verde
Chives with cream cheese
Thyme for vegetable stews and meats
Oregano and octopus
etc.

None of these combinations are to be reproduced with herbs other than the original pairing.

 
Quite an enjoyable thread! Making me hungry, too!

I chose mint simply because when I was a kid my best friend’s yard had an abundance, and I loved the smell and loved putting it in our iced tea.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
I love fennel. Love it in tea, and love to munch it roasted.

Does garlic qualify as a herb ? I hate it and love it.

I love most of the herbs on the list if not all.
Love mint leaves in tea. Excellent in summer.

Coriander is a favorite in Indian cooking, and I think you folks call it Cilantro although there is a difference.

Oregano is quite close to our carom seeds (ajwain). I love it roasted by itself or sprinkled over yogurt with black salt, and some cumin powder and some coriander powder and fennel powder.

Basil is another favourite i use with pasta and some other dishes. I make a basil pesto sometimes with almond in place of pine nuts.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Favorite herb = turmeric. Followed by rosemary and taragon.

My favorite Pole is easily Emily Ratajkowski. But I also appreciate both the North and South poles. Other favorite Poles include Copernicus, Chopin and Marie Curie.

Honorable mention = tennis visionary, @Gregory Diamond.
You lech mammary uv Walesa anne Karol Jozef Wojtyla, the too gratest Polls uv the 20th scenturee.
 

junior74

G.O.A.T.
Voted coriander and will make ceviche, salsa and guacamole tonight to consolidate my vote.

However, parsley is the Federer of herbs. The all court herb.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
I love fennel. Love it in tea, and love to munch it roasted.

Does garlic qualify as a herb ? I hate it and love it.

I love most of the herbs on the list if not all.
Love mint leaves in tea. Excellent in summer.

Coriander is a favorite in Indian cooking, and I think you folks call it Cilantro although there is a difference.

Oregano is quite close to our carom seeds (ajwain). I love it roasted by itself or sprinkled over yogurt with black salt, and some cumin powder and some coriander powder and fennel powder.

Basil is another favourite i use with pasta and some other dishes. I make a basil pesto sometimes with almond in place of pine nuts.
I think garlic and turmeric which are roots do not qualify as herbs. Herbs have to be leaves or stem.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
@MurraysMetalHip
I think garlic and turmeric which are roots do not qualify as herbs. Herbs have to be leaves or stem.
In other news... Ginger (root) and Turmeric (root) are parts (rhizomes) of herbaceous plants.

Herbaceous plants in botany, frequently shortened to herbs, are vascular plants that have no persistent woody stems above ground. So, from this perspective, Ginger and Turmeric qualify as herbs (as well as spices). Garlic is also sometimes referred to an herb.

In general use, herbs are plants with savory or aromatic properties that are used for flavoring and garnishing food, medicinal purposes, or for fragrances; excluding vegetables and other plants consumed for macronutrients. Culinary use will often distinguish herbs from spices... a different perspective.
 
Last edited:

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I think garlic and turmeric which are roots do not qualify as herbs. Herbs have to be leaves or stem.
In my previous post, I referred to turmeric and ginger as roots and as rhizomes. They are actually the latter. A rhizome Is really a specialized type of stem rather than a root.

As to whether these and garlic are herbs, depends on usage. In general usage and botanical usage, they Might be labelled as herbs. But, in culinary usage, they might not be.


 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
@MurraysMetalHip


In other news... Ginger (root) and Turmeric (root) are parts (rhizomes) of herbaceous plants.

Herbaceous plants in botany, frequently shortened to herbs, are vascular plants that have no persistent woody stems above ground. So, from this perspective, Ginger and Turmeric qualify as herbs (as well as spices). Garlic is also sometimes referred to an herb.

In general use, herbs are plants with savory or aromatic properties that are used for flavoring and garnishing food, medicinal purposes, or for fragrances; excluding vegetables and other plants consumed for macronutrients. Culinary use will often distinguish herbs from spices... a different perspective.
@sureshs is always wrong when he tries to correct me :D :D
 
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